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Pastimes : Severe Weather and the Economic Impact -- Ignore unavailable to you. Want to Upgrade?


To: johnlw who wrote (5692)7/10/2020 12:08:07 PM
From: LoneClone1 Recommendation

Recommended By
Benny-Rubin

  Read Replies (2) | Respond to of 5777
 
I just heard an interesting interview with a meteorologist from Alberta and a storm chaser from Saskatchewan.

Both agreed that they have never seen a spring like this for the number and intensity of storms. Apparently there are always lots of storms across Alberta and Saskatchewan this time of year partly because farming makes for plenty of available water to create the storms, but add in how wet it has been this year and you have a virtual storm factory.

I would love to see what the woman from Saskatchewan described, 150-km long lines of storms advancing together across the landscape. Needless to say, you need to be out in the wide open skies of the prairies to see this going on; you'd never know if it happened in mountainous BC.

The guy from Calgary also mentioned that the hailstorm last month in Calgary has turned out to be the most expensive in Canadian history.

This weather has actually been pretty good for gardeners like me. As opposed to the last couple of years when I had to start watering in April, months ahead of normal, the rain every two or three days we have had in Vancouver this year has meant I have hardly had to water at all.

But I know it is not good news for farmers like you. The weather is finally showing signs of summer here in BC; hope that extends out to your area.

LC