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To: LindyBill who wrote (131900)8/12/2005 12:06:28 PM
From: Ilaine  Read Replies (1) | Respond to of 755913
 
You will recognize that we are almost all "Jacksonians" here.

Yes, I do. ;^)

Think I am a Jeffersonian. JohnM is probably a Wilsonian.

Meade's original article is available somewhere on the web. I am just taking a coffee break, will look for it later.



To: LindyBill who wrote (131900)8/12/2005 2:46:49 PM
From: Whitebeard  Respond to of 755913
 
Excellent

When I was in school there were still those that considered Jackson one of our 3 great presidents, along with Washington and Lincoln.

I thought Jackson had lost his place as a great American President because of his war against the Indians, what is now referred to as genocide by such as Ward Churchill.

I now see that he represents everything the Wilsonians hate. That's why he is no longer in Presidential pantheon as taught by the left wing academics.



To: LindyBill who wrote (131900)8/31/2005 6:12:59 AM
From: Taro  Read Replies (1) | Respond to of 755913
 
"The Jacksonian Tradition" by Russel Mead

Long but... very impressive, a major project, engaged and very engaging as well.

Thanks a lot for bringing it. I didn't know. But rest assured that Jacksonians are not only born in your country: Born and raised in Scandinavia, a resident of Germany for 30 years and now living in San Diego half the time, these are the values I grew up with, learned to respect and make my own a long time ago.

Some hope for Europe?

Taro



To: LindyBill who wrote (131900)9/2/2005 10:11:39 AM
From: Taro  Respond to of 755913
 
LB,

I received this comment from my buddy Bob, an old friend of mine living in Dublin, CA. While being familiar with most writings in this area, amazingly he had never heard of this essay before.

Taro

Subject: Re: The Jacksonian Tradition" by Russel Mead.

Written by a real intellect, with a headful of
information and experience to mull over. I think it
hits the nail on the head. Subscription to the
beliefs and principles he describes is what knits
together the vast majority of those Americans we
currently call Conservatives.

Regarding west-Europeans, however, I still fear that
Jacksonians would be found in the minority if an
accurate count were taken. Especially among the
young - the group that matters most. Motivated by
still-too-close memories of war on their own soil,
and too deeply enamored of the paradise that theory
says socialistic government can give them.

Jacksonianism, as he describes it, is too deeply
rooted in the very common (working) man to suit
European thinking. At its base, it's not sufficiently
sophisticated to appeal to the better-educated peoples
of west Europe.

All-in-all, when push comes to shove, I fear that
America can never rely upon west Europe for support
of these most fundamental philosophies. Too many
Europeans believe that even the nastiest international
problems can be solved through entirely peaceful
means.
Especially when alternatives require taking risk.

A partial proof is that the French and Germans, the
largest countries involved in this opinion, were
quite happy and pleased to allow the USA to continue
protecting them from the Soviet Union, at its own
expense, throughout the Cold War. A real Jacksonian
would be too proud to allow that to go on once he
had sufficient resources to look out for himself.

Europeans, though, preferred to spend their wealth on
socialist government and maintenance of a high
standard
of living, even if their defense was being largely
supported by an outside power.

Jacksonians would find that repugnant.