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Technology Stocks : The *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum -- Ignore unavailable to you. Want to Upgrade?


To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (30438)8/16/2009 6:15:09 PM
From: axial  Respond to of 46820
 
Boeing Halts Production of Flawed Dreamliner Part

-snip-

"Boeing confirmed Friday that in June it instructed an Italian company, Alenia Aeronautica, to stop making fuselage sections for the aircraft after small wrinkles were discovered in the carbon composite skin that covers them."

nytimes.com

---

"At present, both Airbus and Boeing have suffered significant delays in production of their latest-generation aircraft. The truth appears to be that new materials (especially composite delamination), and man-machine interaction in unforeseen circumstances are yielding unpredictable results. The point: manufacturer difficulties, recent accidents and parallel research suggest we're at the leading, bleeding edge of aircraft technology - and may be making some mistakes - despite claims to the contrary."

Message 25753539

Jim



To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (30438)11/11/2010 1:01:27 AM
From: axial  Read Replies (1) | Respond to of 46820
 
A380 Anxiety - Searching for Blame in an Airbus Near-Disaster

spiegel.de

" ... Rolls-Royce Faces Some Tough Questions

All that may now change. And the search for who bears ultimate responsibility for this dangerous incident may not just involve aviation experts, but scores of lawyers as well.

By the end of last week, one thing was already clear: If anyone will have to answer uncomfortable questions about the incident, it will be Rolls-Royce, whose Trent 900 engines are used in the versions of the A380 operated by Lufthansa, Singapore Airlines and Qantas.

Since introducing its largest jet engines, which tip the scales at six tons a piece, the conglomerate has been engaged in fierce competition with a joint venture between the US companies General Electric and Pratt & Whitney. Emirates and Air France opted to use the latter's GP7200 engines for their A380 fleets, which many experts view as being more economical -- in terms of both price and fuel consumption -- than the Rolls-Royce engines. Even so, the British company still managed to secure roughly half of the contracts in the much-contested market.

Nevertheless, there is one striking difference. Companies operating A380s outfitted with the American engines have reported far fewer problems with them than with the British-made engine. For example, last Friday, another Qantas jumbo jet, a Boeing 747, had to return to Singapore after experiencing problems with its Rolls-Royce engines...

... Boeing Also Has Problems

Airbus chief Tom Enders and his colleagues will surely also find some comfort in the fact that Boeing, their main competitor, is also battling its own streak of bad luck. Just recently, mysterious vibrations in the freight model of the Boeing 747-8, a rival aircraft to their A380, have led the company to push back delivery of the first carriers for what is already the fourth time. Likewise, the new long-range 787 is turning out to be a veritable nightmare for the US company. Delivery of the aircraft is already over two and a half years late -- even more than was the case with the A380.

Just last August, Boeing was forced to postpone the delivery of its first so-called Dreamliner, to the Japanese airline All Nippon Airways (ANA), to the first quarter of 2011. At that time, one of the engines planned for the 787 suffered major damage during a test run in the British city of Derby. The 787s will also be outfitted with Rolls-Royce's Trent 1000 engines, which are designed to be particularly fuel-efficient. The company has assured the public that the problems previously encountered with the engines were fixed long ago."

---

["At present, both Airbus and BOEING have suffered significant delays in production of their latest-generation aircraft. The truth appears to be that new materials (especially composite delamination), and man-machine interaction in unforeseen circumstances are yielding unpredictable results. The point: manufacturer difficulties, recent accidents and parallel research suggest we're at the leading, bleeding edge of aircraft technology - and may be making some mistakes - despite claims to the contrary."

Message 25868282 ]


Jim