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Non-Tech : Airline Discussion Board -- Ignore unavailable to you. Want to Upgrade?


To: Moonray who wrote (1657)10/27/2021 2:57:32 PM
From: TimF2 Recommendations

Recommended By
Moonray
Stock Puppy

  Read Replies (1) | Respond to of 1729
 
With the short time frame (a bit over two years to three years) and the small capacity it seems like a demonstration more than anything meaningful.

Hydrogen does have some serious advantages (in addition to what is probably the motivation, the fact that perfect burning of Hydrogen doesn't emit CO2). Its abundant in the universe, and in compounds (for example water) its abundant on Earth. It also has a lot of energy per weight.

But its difficult to handle and transport. Its density is very low. Store it as a gas and you need huge tanks. Store it as a liquid and it still needs tanks over three times as large as jet fuel or gasoline or diesel, and you also have to store it at more than 423 degrees below zero (or slightly higher with some pressure but still a cryogenic temperatures). Its escapes easily from containment so you lose some of it why you store it (even stored for use in the tank of a vehicle that's burning it) or transporting it. And when it escapes it can (depending on how its stored) cause en.wikipedia.org, or under some conditions en.wikipedia.org

Its low molecular and atomic weight and high energy to weight ratios do make it a good fuel for spacecraft (or it can be reaction mass for spacecraft that don't rely on burning it), and it has some other niche applications, but I don't think it will have any wide spread transportation use any time soon (spacecraft being a small enough proportion of transportation to not count as "wide spread").

Its use doesn't even necessarily reduce CO2 emissions because currently most hydrogen is generated from fossil fuels.



To: Moonray who wrote (1657)10/28/2021 9:05:40 AM
From: OldAIMGuy1 Recommendation

Recommended By
Stock Puppy

  Respond to of 1729
 
Hi M, Re: Hydrogen fueled aircraft....................

The problem isn't with the technology to use hydrogen to create motive power. The problem comes from creating a source of hydrogen that isn't impacting the environment to a worse degree than a carbon based fuel itself.

Sources of hydrogen are either hydrocarbon based or electrolysis based. Hydrocarbon based systems for generation hydrogen are endothermic (they use more energy than they create) and therefore not practical and also liberate CO². Electrolysis is just plain energy intensive no matter what the source.

It's tough to bypass the laws of thermodynamics!

Best wishes,
OAG Tom



To: Moonray who wrote (1657)10/30/2021 12:33:23 AM
From: Stock Puppy1 Recommendation

Recommended By
OldAIMGuy

  Respond to of 1729
 
Commercial flights that fly ‘entirely on hydrogen’ planned for 2024

o~~~ O



Sure that isn't a lot of hot air?

Oh wait ...

(Starts over)

Isn't it dangerous if some hydrogen gets into the air?
Then you'll get ... Hair!
.
.
Helium heard that joke - but Helium didn't react.
.
.
You didn't find that funny also?
You must not be hydrogen then.
after all, all the other elements are somewhat denser. (oooh!)

Therefore you need a real joke:
.
.
.
Two hydrogen atoms decide that they want to ride on the Large Hadron Collider.
]
They jump on a plane to Switzerland and sneak in while no one is looking. As they start to speed up one of them realizes that they have both lost their electrons. One mentions it to his friend who asks "Are you sure?"
]
His friend replied, "Yes, I'm positive." (ouch)
.
.
.
"Hydrogen Monoxide! Hydrogen Monoxide! Hydrogen Monoxide!" shouted Santa.
]
*Asking the Chemistry teacher to play Santa this year seemed to have backfired*