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To: Don Green who wrote (51216)2/21/2006 5:23:05 PM
From: Dan Fleuris  Read Replies (1) | Respond to of 211863
 
"The idea that Apple would ditch its own OS for Microsoft Windows"
Sorry Don, bu t I just don't see that happening.
Also, who says market share hasn't increaed post iPod introduction? Seems just the opposite is true.
Dan



To: Don Green who wrote (51216)2/21/2006 5:27:43 PM
From: Done, gone.  Read Replies (1) | Respond to of 211863
 
Yeah, yeah, yeah, what else is new, he's been peddling that crap for a decade.

Message 2502473



To: Don Green who wrote (51216)2/21/2006 6:50:05 PM
From: Cogito  Respond to of 211863
 
Don -

That's a good one. Dvorak is always interesting, if often wrong.

In this article he devotes two paragraphs to the idea that a lack of drivers for peripherals "would be" a big problem for Apple. As if this is a problem that will develop in the future.

"As someone who believed that the Apple OS x86 could gravitate toward the PC rather than Windows toward the Mac, I have to be realistic. It boils down to the add-ons. Linux on the desktop never caught on because too many devices don't run on that OS. It takes only one favorite gizmo or program to stop a user from changing. Chat rooms are filled with the likes of 'How do I get my DVD burner to run on Linux?' This would get old fast at Apple."

Apple has always had this driver issue to deal with. Sometimes it's a problem. Since their market share is increasing, it will become less of a problem over time.

It's also strange to say that Linux hasn't caught on in a bigger way because of driver issues. Drivers are only one of the many stumbling blocks the average user faces with Linux.

- Allen



To: Don Green who wrote (51216)2/21/2006 6:54:01 PM
From: X-Ray Man  Respond to of 211863
 

Bigger companies than Apple have dropped their proprietary OSs in favor of Windows—think IBM and OS/2.


And look how many of those companies continued to make money selling high-end Windows boxes. Oh, yeah, none. They dumped those businesses. Dvorak is an idiot.



To: Don Green who wrote (51216)2/22/2006 5:43:45 PM
From: Doren  Read Replies (3) | Respond to of 211863
 
Linux on the desktop never caught on because too many devices don't run on that OS. It takes only one favorite gizmo or program to stop a user from changing. Chat rooms are filled with the likes of "How do I get my DVD burner to run on Linux?" This would get old fast at Apple.

Linux is close to catching on. In fact Dvorak is showing his cultural inculcation. Linux is bigger in the very countries where computer use is still taking off.

In my own case I see the very real possiblilty of migrating to Linux. I already plan to drop Windows. I may also drop OSX or at least relegate it to my secondary OS ready to burn a DVD if I needed it. I'm less and less interested in upgrading my software too.

My reasoning for a possible move is I hate DRM. That's the part of the Intel migration that has me worried. I see DRM as a metaphor for companies to do what is best for them rather than what's best for the consumer. If Apple starts laying too much DRM on me I'm gone or at least I'll start experimenting. One reason I don't use iTunes is I hate the DRM factor. It's so limiting. If I spend $1000 bucks at Amazon on tunes I can sell them for a bit less and maybe more, plus it's childs play to rip every CD I have. If I spend $1000 for tunes on iTunes its money down the drain forever. If I goof on backups it's money I might possibly have to respend.

Plus Linux is free baby. I can get a faster box for my money. That's a nice perk. Open Office sounds better all the time to me.

The driver thing is a red herring. It's the interface that has held back Linux and the interface has come a long way. It's just slightly more of a hassle than Windows. The other problem last time I installed Linux was the installer had one crucial major interface glitch involving the scratch disk partition. I believe newer versions are better.

Dvorak seems a bit distanced and isolated.