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   Technology StocksMSFT: Will NT kill SUN, HP and IBM?


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To: Steve Lee who wrote (86)8/18/1997 6:18:00 PM
From: Doc Savage
   of 100
 
By the year 2000, 9 out of 10 client applications will be written for NT!

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To: David A. Lethe who wrote (85)8/18/1997 10:23:00 PM
From: Kev.
   of 100
 
...HP is not dumping PA-RISC. Merced will run both x86 AND PA-RISC...

Yuck!

PA-RISC is horrible - I tried reading the manuals to write a
spinlock in assembler. Never worked out how to do it :-/

- it was really simple for SPARC and only marginally harder for
MIPS.

- and x86 sucks too...

A processor that does both sounds like a really bad idea to me. Two
processors (one for each would be better) - which is what I hear Sun
is doing with SPARC & x86.

Kev.

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To: Kev. who wrote (88)8/19/1997 10:13:00 AM
From: David A. Lethe
   of 100
 
Ouch: No wonder you don't like PA-RISC assembler. Don't go down that path. HP's C compilers have the best optimization in the industry.

Unless you are in the top 1% of ASM coders in the country, chances are that a ANSI C program will compile into more efficient code. Their compilers take full advantage of pipelining, branch prediction, and so on. Even though you might generate less op codes manually, the compiler will generally see to it that you will use less clock cycles.

x86 sucks ... I agree.

Merced will probably be a chip set, rather than a single microprocessor, with some external microcode. Word isn't out that it will execute PA-RISC code and x86 concurrently.

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To: Doc Savage who wrote (87)8/19/1997 7:37:00 PM
From: Robert Scott Diver
   of 100
 
Doc, Do you have backup for your prediction? NT doesn't scale, so it can't be used for big time applications. Look at the problems Microsoft is having running their web page with their software on Intel processors. The concensus in many places is that NT is OK for small servers/applications, but UNIX and non-Intel is needed for the high end. Why would 9 of 10 client applications be written for NT? Some think a majority of the clients won't even have Wintel by 2000. Scott

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To: David A. Lethe who wrote (89)8/20/1997 1:10:00 AM
From: Kev.
   of 100
 
...Unless you are in the top 1% of ASM coders in the country...

Actually, I did a better job on the the spin-lock manually than
a C compiler would do because:

1. It's not a C construct.
2. You can enter a routine in multiple places in assembler - the
spin-lock works better entering in the middle.

FYI:

A spin-lock is used in multi-threaded parallel processing to stop
more than one thread at a time accessing the same data. It's about
8 or 9 instructions in SPARC code. The system library version was
rather flabby.

Anyway, the whole Merced thing sounds like another of those day-late-dollar-short slightly off the mark HP efforts.

Kev.

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To: Doc Savage who wrote (87)8/20/1997 7:54:00 PM
From: Jalali
   of 100
 
Arthur Andersen, SAP, and Microsoft Corp. are joining forces to promote computer systems for midsized businesses based on NT.
biz.yahoo.com

Accounting software often dictates the data processing system selected. NT fans may want to visit the "NT Accounting Software" thread to see momentum that is building for NT in accounting applications.
Subject 16325

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To: Kev. who wrote (91)8/21/1997 11:01:00 AM
From: ArnieC
   of 100
 
KEV et al:
HWP conference call at 1-(800)633 8284 code 2857062. Available until 8/22.
Arnie

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To: Doc Savage who wrote (87)8/21/1997 1:16:00 PM
From: Benjamin Ostrom
   of 100
 
Maybe by 2000, but today NT has a lot fewer apps than the Macintosh and of course Win 95. If Apple can pull off with Rapsody/OpenStep what they did when they went to PPC on the developer side, and side with Sun and Oracle, then there's a good chance that it can convince the unix users to opt for a Rapsody GUI overlay to Unix. On the Apple SI board, a lot of developers are impressed by Rapsody.

Why do you really think that Gates used $100 + MM to copy code and another $150 MM to "settle" a PR disaster for MSFT.

Remember that NT is still buggy, and a lot of companies are postponing their upgrades - even ones that made earlier decisions to go ahead are really postponing implementation IMO.

Sincerely,
Ben

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To: Kev. who wrote (79)8/22/1997 3:06:00 AM
From: Freeflight
   of 100
 
maybe it is the hollywood tie in for movies videostreaming off the net...like the vxtreme msft acquistion last week.
freeflight

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To: Jalali who wrote (92)8/22/1997 5:54:00 AM
From: Michael L. Voorhees
   of 100
 
Jalali: you guys better check this out before recommending NT.
standishgroup.com

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