SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  For example, here is how to disable FireFox ad content blocking while on Silicon Investor.

   Technology StocksImpossible Foods and Beyond


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: zax who wrote (32)5/19/2019 9:40:04 PM
From: Julius Wong
   of 151
 
Thanks for sharing.

I'll wait for Improved products.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Ron who wrote (29)5/20/2019 4:33:51 PM
From: Labrador
   of 151
 
I was going to buy them at whole foods, but when i saw them (they looked frozen over - with some ice on them), I didn't buy them. I thought that they'd have lower calories (I don't recall what the calorie count was).

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Ron5/21/2019 10:35:22 AM
1 Recommendation   of 151
 
Here come 'Impossible Sausage Pizzas' at Little Caesar's
cnet.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: zax5/23/2019 9:28:20 AM
1 Recommendation   of 151
 
Impossible Foods’ rising empire of almost-meat
How a burger maker became a “platform.”

engadget.com

This April Fools' Day, Impossible Foods was behind a prank video. Customers in a St Louis branch of Burger King were surreptitiously filmed eating the restaurant's flagship Whopper. First they rhapsodized about their love for beef. Then they were told they'd just eaten a plant-based Impossible Burger.
"It's made of fucking beef right here, you see that?" one customer told the camera -- expletive bleeped out -- peeling back his sandwich to reveal the monochrome disc beneath. "That's impossible. It tasted just like a Whopper should taste," said another. Cue close-ups of flames, blackened grills and fat-spitting patties.

The minute-long video announced Impossible's biggest partnership yet: a Burger King Whopper made of plant-based meat that sells for $1 more than a regular one. The deal is a stamp of approval from fast food royalty that will eventually insert Impossible's vegan patty right into mainstream America's daily dietary choices.

I've eaten Impossible meat in gua baos, salad bowls, Lebanese kafta and White Castle sliders. I'm mostly astounded at how plausibly generic it is, how unobtrusively it replaces the ketchup-and-plastic-cheese-smothered slice of gray that usually resides within a fast food bun. How enough heavy spicing or dousing in sauce could sneak an Impossible product past my taste buds, perhaps to be called out in a semi-viral moment of my own.

Tasted without accompaniments, the product has a convincing chew and toasty burnt edges but a hollow savoriness at the core. As a meat eater, I would not crave Impossible meat. If I craved a burger, though, this could go part of the way to satisfying the urge. Note that in the Burger King video, the customers' astoundment hits not when they taste the burger but when they realize they couldn't tell the difference.

This is what's revolutionary about Impossible's burger -- not that it's the best you've ever tasted but that finally there's a viable, inoffensive alternative for meat that you can find at a drive-through for less than $6.

In the trillion-dollar market for meat, inoffensive is a paradigm shift. Veggie burgers have existed in the US since the 1980s; mock meats made by Chinese Buddhists date back to the seventh century. But most meat proxies have historically either not tasted like the real thing or not aspired to.

</snip> Read the rest here: engadget.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: zax5/24/2019 11:20:49 AM
1 Recommendation   of 151
 
Cultural Tree Huggers Push Impossible Foods To $2 Billion Valuation

forbes.com

Plant based meat alternatives company Impossible Foods just got a huge cultural endorsement and money from Serena Williams, Jaden Smith, Trevor Noah and Jay-Z. In its latest funding round they picked up another $300 million from investors with a new valuation of $2 billion, as they aim to completely remove animals from the food system by 2035.

The Breakdown You Need to Know

Jay Z famously rapped “Difficult takes a day, impossible takes a week” and he along with others figured out in short order how to get in on the vegetable-based faux meat companies movement. Impossible Foods has deals with big real meat restaurant chains, including Red Robin, White Castle and Burger King, and plans to launch in retail stores later this year.

It’s great that so many black cultural trendsetters are putting their money where the mouth is, especially with hypertension and heart disease so common within this community. CultureBanx reported nearly 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of cardiovascular disease that includes heart disease, according to the CDC. The government group notes one of the ways to control these diseases is through a healthy diet, so perhaps plant based alternatives can help bring these numbers down in the black community.

Not only can companies like Impossible Foods have a positive impact on the health of African Amerians, its investors stand to make a lot of money. The Good Food Institute (GFI) reported investment in this space has reached $16 billion over the last decade. Also, supermarket sales of meat alternatives grew 19% to $878 million last year, according to Nielsen data. Even though sales of plant-based meat alone generated $684 million in 2018, it still pales in comparison to the $270 billion in annual U.S. meat industry sales.

</snip> Read the rest here: forbes.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: zax who wrote (37)5/24/2019 2:09:09 PM
From: Ron
1 Recommendation   of 151
 
'Moving Mountains' vegan hot dogs are popular in Britain and are on their way to the U.S.
washingtonpost.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: zax5/24/2019 7:38:28 PM
   of 151
 
I tried Quorn meatless grounds from Whole Foods tonight.

It was awful.


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: zax5/26/2019 7:17:32 PM
   of 151
 
I tried Engine 2's "Italian Fennel Plant Burger" tonight, from Whole Foods.



I was actually quite delicious, made a great burger. But it was in no way an attempt to emulate meat. It tasked more like a burger-shaped falafel ball. I will definitely have this again.

While a very good product, it is not at all a competitor in Impossible Foods "space", IMO.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Ron5/26/2019 7:37:41 PM
1 Recommendation   of 151
 
Ingredient and taste comparison: Beyond Burger and Impossible Burger
cnet.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: zax5/28/2019 3:25:10 PM
1 Recommendation   of 151
 
One thing might keep the Impossible Burger from saving the planet: Steak

washingtonpost.com



It was a veggie-burger tasting, sometime in the late 1990s, that made me swear off veggie burgers. In the Clinton era, they were enough to shake anyone’s confidence in the category, and mine was shaken to the tune of two decades of abstinence.

But it’s a new day in plant-based meat substitutes. The two versions making headlines — in both food and business news — are the Beyond Burger, made mostly from pea protein, and the Impossible Burger, mostly soy. The news is pretty good. They’re very convincing impostors, and people who have given up meat — or want to eat less of it — are flocking to such chains as Umami Burger and Red Robin to give the Impossible a try. And once Burger King rolls out the Impossible Whopper countrywide, I think it’s safe to use the word “mainstream.”

But the companies behind these products are looking to do more than offer a meaty experience without the meat. They’re out to save the planet. Bruce Friedrich, executive director of the Good Food Institute, a nonprofit organization that supports and promotes meat substitutes, doesn’t foresee the complete replacement of meat, but he predicts transformation on the order of cellphones replacing landlines. Sure, some dinosaurs still have landlines, but the way we communicate has changed.

Pat Brown, CEO of Impossible Foods, which makes the Impossible Burger, aims higher. “We’re dead serious about completely replacing beef,” he told me. The company plans to do it “by completely eliminating the economic incentive for animal farming and fishing,” and it plans to do it by 2035.

Is that possible? Is it desirable? Even though I’d answer both questions with a resounding “probably not,” I’m a big fan of the category, and I believe it will change the market for meat — a market that could use some changing.

Some of the wins are unequivocal. Although people certainly disagree about the extent to which animals suffer in our system — on farms and in slaughterhouses — all those problems go away. So does risk for food-borne illnesses from fecal contamination. Eating plants, rather than feeding them to animals and eating the animals, is inherently more efficient. No antibiotics are required. I still think cattle play an important role turning grass that’s grown on unfarmable land into high-quality protein and providing milk, farm labor and transportation to some of the world’s poorest farmers, but we need to cut back on beef in the developed world and try to flatten the curve on increasing demand as more people worldwide are brought into the middle class.

The biggest issue, though, and the one that seems to motivate a lot of the people working in the sector, is climate change. Replacing beef is a big carbon win.

How big is, of course, hotly debated. Richard Waite is a researcher at the World Resources Institute, and it’s his job to do the math on greenhouse gases. According to him, beef is responsible for about 6 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions (add dairy, and cattle’s total comes to 10 percent). Methane from their digestive systems, gases from their manure breaking down, and deforestation either to create pasture or grow feed are the biggest factors. As we talk about beef, it’s important to remember that it’s a much smaller factor than fossil fuels, but it’s the biggest of dietary factors.

</snip> Read the rest here: washingtonpost.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10