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   PoliticsClimate Change


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From: ryanaka11/9/2019 1:31:46 PM
   of 852
 
The rapidly changing scenario:

  • Computer modeling in 2016: Sea level rise up to 6ft => world’s great coastal cities, including New York, London and Hong Kong, would become inundated.
  • Were the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica to melt, sea levels would rise by an estimated 225 feet worldwide. (68.58m)






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To: ryanaka who wrote (717)11/9/2019 1:39:57 PM
From: ryanaka
   of 852
 
  • a single heat wave would measurably raise sea levels,at an estimated two one-hundredths of an inch, bake the Arctic and produce Sahara-like temperatures in Paris and Berlin, the prediction would have been dismissed as alarmist.
  • many worst-case scenarios from that time are now realities.
  • scientists “tend to underestimate the severity of threats and the rapidity with which they might unfold” and said one of the reasons was “the perceived need for consensus.” This has had severe consequences, diluting what should have been a sense of urgency and vastly understating the looming costs of adaptation and dislocation as the planet continues to warm.
  • the projected risks of further warming, dire as they are, might still be understated. How bad will things get?
  • the costs of underestimation have been enormous. New York City’s subway system did not flood in its first 108 years, but Hurricane Sandy’s 2012 storm surge caused nearly $5 billion in water damage, much of which is still not repaired.
  • In 2017, Hurricane Harvey gave Houston and the surrounding region a $125 billion lesson about the costs of misjudging the potential for floods.
  • we are headed for warming of at least 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit. That will come with almost unimaginable damage to economies and ecosystems.
  • Dr. Broecker who, in 1975, predicted that emissions of carbon dioxide would raise global temperatures significantly in the 21st century. This is now seen as prophetic, but at the time, Dr. Broecker was an outlier.
  • the climate could change massively within a decade or two;
  • in the early 1990s, scientists completed more precise studies of ice cores extracted from the Greenland ice sheet. Dust and oxygen isotopes encased in the cores provided a detailed climate record going back eons. It revealed that there had been 25 rapid climate change events like the Younger Dryas in the last glacial period.
  • “changes of up to 16 degrees Celsius and a factor of 2 in precipitation have occurred in some places in periods as short as decades to years.”
  • the implications of such potential rapid changes had not yet been considered by policymakers and economists. And even today, 17 years later, a substantial portion of the American public remains unaware or unconvinced it is happening.
  • Were the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica to melt, sea levels would rise by an estimated 225 feet worldwide. (68.58m)
  • Ice shelves, which are floating extensions of land ice, hold back glaciers from sliding into the sea and eventually melting. In the early 2000s, ice shelves began disintegrating in several parts of Antarctica, and scientists realized that process could greatly accelerate the demise of the vastly larger ice sheets themselves. And some major glaciers are dumping ice directly into the ocean.
  • an irreversible collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet had already begun, and computer modeling in 2016 indicated that its disintegration in concert with other melting could raise sea levels up to six feet by 2100, about twice the increase described as a possible worst-case scenario just three years earlier. At that pace, some of the world’s great coastal cities, including New York, London and Hong Kong, would become inundated.
  • they are also warming at a pace unanticipated as recently as five years ago. This is very bad news. For one thing, a warmer ocean means more powerful storms, and die-offs of marine life, but it also suggests that the planet is more sensitive to increased carbon dioxide emissions than previously thought.
  • The melting of permafrost has also defied expectations. This is ground that has remained frozen for at least two consecutive years and covers around a quarter of the exposed land mass of the Northern Hemisphere. As recently as 1995, it was thought to be stable. But by 2005, the National Center for Atmospheric Research estimated that up to 90 percent of the Northern Hemisphere’s topmost layer of permafrost could thaw by 2100, releasing vast amounts of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere.
  • a warming globe would be accompanied by an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather. the extremely rapid intensification of storms, as on Sept. 1, when Hurricane Dorian’s sustained winds intensified from 150 to 185 miles per hour in just nine hours, and last year when Hurricane Michael grew from tropical depression to major hurricane in just two days.
  • https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/08/opinion/sunday/science-climate-change.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

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From: ryanaka11/13/2019 9:51:16 AM
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Venice under water

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From: ryanaka11/13/2019 12:43:52 PM
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'Venice Is On Its Knees': Mayor Blames Worst Flood Tide In 50 Years On Climate Change
npr.org


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From: ryanaka11/13/2019 1:16:39 PM
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Extreme Weather = Climate Change

This Arctic blast is shattering hundreds of records and causing deadly road conditions. And it's not over
cnn.com

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From: ryanaka11/13/2019 7:03:22 PM
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Climate change makes bushfires worse. Denying the truth doesn't change the facts
theguardian.com

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From: ryanaka11/20/2019 1:55:55 PM
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America's many toxic waste sites are in areas at risk of worsening natural disasters

cnn.com


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From: ryanaka11/26/2019 9:23:50 AM
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Greenhouse Gas Emissions Are Still Rising, U.N. Report Says
npr.org

Global temperature rises could bring 'destructive' effects
reuters.com

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To: ryanaka who wrote (726)11/26/2019 10:08:03 AM
From: ryanaka
   of 852
 
All Trump properties will become worthless by 2100.
Do not buy.

"The Earth is already more than 1 degree warmer than it was before industrialization, and that is driving more frequent and severe storms, droughts, heat waves and other extreme weather. According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment, if global emissions fail to fall in the coming decade, it will slow economic growth and cause serious damage to infrastructure and property in the United States."

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To: ryanaka who wrote (726)11/26/2019 10:15:36 AM
From: ryanaka
   of 852
 
Emissions rose to a record 55.3 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2018.


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