SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology StocksInvesting in Exponential Growth


Previous 10 Next 10 
From: Paul H. Christiansen6/13/2019 9:42:31 AM
   of 963
 
Bill Gates just backed a chip startup that uses light to turbocharge AI

Advances in computing, from speedier processors to cheaper data storage, helped ignite the new AI era. Now demand for even faster, more energy-efficient AI models is driving a wave of innovation in semiconductors.

Luminous Computing, which recently raised $9 million of seed funding from prominent investors including Bill Gates and Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, has an ambitious plan to accelerate AI with a new chip. While conventional semiconductors use electrons to help carry out the demanding mathematical calculations that power AI models, Luminous is using light instead.

Many industries are trying to pack an increasing amount of AI into their machines, including makers of autonomous cars and drones. But widely used electrical chips like central processing units aren’t ideal for those tasks because they use a lot of power and may not be able to process data fast enough.

These limitations can cause lags and delays—annoying if you’re waiting for some machine-learning results for a research paper, but far more serious if you’re relying on an AI algorithm to guide a car down a busy street.

Read More $ MIT Technology Review

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen8/25/2019 10:20:55 AM
1 Recommendation   of 963
 
This posting represents my “farewell” to this segment of Silicon Investor.

I’ve spent most of my life searching for a systematic, repeatable process for discovering growth stocks. Among others, that search included following the “big bet” investments being made by institutional investors and my own unusual price/volume metrics.

The problem with all those searches was not that they failed to uncover winners – they did that. However, they also discovered losers – almost equally.

In mid-2018 I finally came upon a metric that thus far has produced dramatic performance . . .revenue growth. Here are the results of blending that metric with my unusual price/volume metrics, as of August 23, 2018:

UVM Picks Composite: +69.1%

S&P 500: +5.3%

Nasdaq Composite: +4.0%

If you have an interest in following future performance, visit my web site at the following URL.

uvmetrics.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:30:30 AM
1 Recommendation   of 963
 
U.S. Pushing Effort to Develop 5G Alternative to Huawei

Seeking to blunt the dominance by China’s Huawei Technologies Co., the White House is working with U.S. technology companies to create advanced software for next-generation 5G telecommunications networks.

The plan would build on efforts by some U.S. telecom and technology companies to agree on common engineering standards that would allow 5G software developers to run code atop machines that come from nearly any hardware manufacturer. That would reduce, if not eliminate, reliance on Huawei equipment.

Companies including Microsoft Corp., Dell Inc. and AT&T Inc. are part of the effort, White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said.

Read More $ WSJ

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:35:17 AM
1 Recommendation   of 963
 
U.S. Pushing Effort to Develop 5G Alternative to Huawei

Seeking to blunt the dominance by China’s Huawei Technologies Co., the White House is working with U.S. technology companies to create advanced software for next-generation 5G telecommunications networks.

The plan would build on efforts by some U.S. telecom and technology companies to agree on common engineering standards that would allow 5G software developers to run code atop machines that come from nearly any hardware manufacturer. That would reduce, if not eliminate, reliance on Huawei equipment.

Companies including Microsoft Corp., Dell Inc. and AT&T Inc. are part of the effort, White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said.

Read More $ WSJ

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:36:41 AM
   of 963
 
Santa Cruz air taxi startup scores $590M funding from Toyota, others

Joby Aviation Inc. on Wednesday got a big boost in its plans to offer flying taxis with a $590 million funding round led by Toyota Motor Corp.

The deal makes Santa Cruz-based Joby the best-funded startup in the race to offer air taxis, though it isn't yet ready to start offering its service to the public.

Joby said it plans to operate its aircraft as a service, charging passengers per trip. It hasn't said how much rides will cost, instead projecting that over time it "should approach the cost of ground transportation."

Joby has now raised a total of $720 million. It said it will use the new funds to accelerate the certification and deployment of its five-seat aircraft. It is now testing protoypes and aims to launch its first commercial flights in 2023.

Read More – Silicon Valley Business Journal

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:41:47 AM
   of 963
 
Why private micro-networks could be the future of how we connect

Forget amassing likes or cultivating your online persona. Apps like Cocoon are all about being your true self with just a select few people.

On paper, Cocoon sounds a lot like Facebook: it wants to connect people in virtual space. The difference is that it only wants to connect family members in small, distinct groups. Imagine a feed of updates from family members—your brother announcing that he’d landed on his work trip, a video of your niece learning to walk, a location cursor on a cousin backpacking through Europe—all attached to a messaging capability that threads conversations, and all restricted to the members of your group (12 is the current maximum).

Read More – MIT Technology Review

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:45:02 AM
   of 963
 
Facebook’s Chief Scientist - Mass Adoption of AR Is Years Away

Five to 10 years. That’s how long Michael Abrash, chief scientist at Facebook, predicts it will take before augmented reality glasses—which will display digital images and data on wearable devices that people view through—is ready for the masses.

Abrash leads Facebook Reality Labs, a Redmond, Washington–based research group that includes teams of academics and engineers working on new generations of consumer hardware devices, including virtual reality and AR products. His cautious timeline for AR eyewear reflects a series of technical breakthroughs in everything from batteries to user interfaces that will need to happen before large numbers of people are willing to wear computers on their faces.

Read More - $The Information

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:50:05 AM
   of 963
 
Why Slack Will Be Acquired

This time last year, Slack Technologies, the popular workplace chat provider, was one of the most eagerly anticipated public tech debuts of 2019. That seems like a long time ago. Since Slack went public in June, its stock has dropped about 40%.

The reason for the slump: Revenue growth at Slack is slowing and competition is intensifying, especially from Microsoft. The tech giant is relying on a familiar tactic—bundling a Slack killer with a widely used existing product, its Office 365 suite of apps. Given that competitive pressure, I predict 2020 will be the year that—after years of acquisition speculation—a larger tech company will finally buy Slack.

Potential suitors could include Amazon—which has reportedly eyed Slack in the past—and Google. Both companies are top providers of cloud computing services and could plug Slack into their cloud units to increase the revenue they generate from online applications.

Read More - $The Information

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:52:55 AM
   of 963
 
Why Is TSLA Surging

The controversy regarding the Telsa story is far from over. While the company is no longer at risk of running out of money, the debate around justified market cap continues, given the company is now worth more than Ford and GM combined. The timing of EV adoption, profitability, Elon Musk’s suitability as CEO, and competition continue to be relevant to the Tesla investing conversation. We were surprised to find recently reported trading data in the month of December that short interest only decreased from 15% to 14.3% as Tesla shares increased 17% from 12/13 to 12/31. In other words, contrary to our earlier belief, much of the move in December appears to be related to an increase in long shareholder positions vs short covering. This 14.3% short interest remains higher than typical tech stocks of 1-6%. Given the trajectory of today’s gains, it is likely that short covering is the primary factor in the move.

Read More - $Loup Ventures

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Paul H. Christiansen2/4/2020 11:56:38 AM
1 Recommendation   of 963
 
This Has Been the Best Year Ever

If you’re depressed by the state of the world, let me toss out an idea: In the long arc of human history, 2019 has been the best year ever.

The bad things that you fret about are true. But it’s also true that since modern humans emerged about 200,000 years ago, 2019 was probably the year in which children were least likely to die, adults were least likely to be illiterate and people were least likely to suffer excruciating and disfiguring diseases.

Every single day in recent years, another 325,000 people got their first access to electricity. Each day, more than 200,000 got piped water for the first time. And some 650,000 went online for the first time, every single day.

Read More – NY Times

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10