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   Technology StocksResearch Frontiers Lonely Hearts Club Thread.


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To: DashernComet who wrote (112)8/29/2018 9:39:43 PM
From: DashernComet
1 Recommendation   of 168
 
Hope stock story #2

Dixon is all giddy and titalate because volume is (happy surprise) triple normal volume and the stock price is up 30% in a week and a half.

Message 31768105

Like we have never seen this “hope” event before—go back and look at a chart for REFR in April 2018.


What did we see in April?
Volume spiked
Price spiked


Why?


We had the same good news both in April and August......Joe sold more stock and issued more warrants and got another year or so of cash in the barn.
Is it Gauzy?
Panasonic?
Vision Systems?
Avery Dennison?
No
No
No
No


Life support was continued and so was hope.

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To: DashernComet who wrote (113)8/30/2018 10:43:05 AM
From: DashernComet
   of 168
 
Hope is never having to tell the truth

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To: DashernComet who wrote (114)9/1/2018 3:57:18 PM
From: DashernComet
   of 168
 
So poor Dixon is called out as the perfect contrarian indicator—and there is no rebuttal.

Message 31769746

And no denial.

I’m going to Faribault next week. Gonna be interesting to hear their take on RFI and Gauzy. I shan’t elaborate.

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To: DashernComet who wrote (115)9/4/2018 8:20:37 AM
From: DashernComet
   of 168
 
So the matters of integrity and revenues have been brought up—and Longs deny there is a problem.

The issue of why REFR has become a chronically sub $1 stock is clear to some.

Message 31773847

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To: DashernComet who wrote (116)9/20/2018 11:13:05 AM
From: StockDung
   of 168
 
BUT ITS NOT REEFR-> "Large dimmable panoramic windows provide an unobstructed view and can be adjusted in tint according to outside ambient lighting conditions."
https://www.railwayage.com/passenger/whats-inside-dome-car-number-two/

What’s inside dome car number two?

Written by William C. Vantuono, Editor-in-Chief September 06, 2018 Intercity, News, Passenger


Stadler Pankow GmbH’s second double-deck dome car for Canada’s Rocky Mountaineer luxury tourist train is on its way to Kamloops, B.C., crossing the Atlantic Ocean and making its way to the West Coast through the Panama Canal and the Pacific Ocean.

In 2015, Stadler received an order for the design, development and production of ten custom-built GoldLeaf railcars to complete the Rocky Mountaineer fleet. The first car is completing track testing in Canada.

Transportation of the 89-foot-long, 10-foot-high railcar “is one of the major milestones of the project,” Stadler said. “The journey takes the impressive dome car from Berlin through inland water routes to the North Sea, where it is shipped onto an ocean vessel and through the Panama Canal. After arrival at the U.S. West Coast, the railcar will continue its journey on rails to the Rocky Mountaineer site in Kamloops.

The GoldLeaf dome cars are scheduled for regular service with the beginning of the next season. Each of the ten cars has the capacity to host up to 72 passengers on its upper deck, which includes electronically adjustable and rotatable seats equipped with a leg rest and a heating system. Large dimmable panoramic windows provide an unobstructed view and can be adjusted in tint according to outside ambient lighting conditions.

The lower deck includes a fully equipped kitchen area in which on-board chefs prepare à la carte meals that can be ordered in the restaurant area. Two flights of stairs connect the upper and lower decks, complemented by a lift for customers with impaired mobility.

“Tailor-made projects such as the Rocky Mountaineer GoldLeaf cars are one of our core business areas,” said Stadler Pankow GmbH CEO Ulf Braker. “This means that we are sometimes facing very big [problems] for which we always find a solution—always having our motto in mind, ‘Impossible is Possible.’ Even for us, a project like the Rocky Mountaineer is very special, and we are very proud and happy once the railcar is in passenger service.”



Categories: Intercity, News, PassengerTags: Breaking News, GoldLeaf, Rocky Mountaineer, Stadler Pankow GmbH

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To: StockDung who wrote (117)9/20/2018 12:11:34 PM
From: DashernComet
   of 168
 
Curious minds want to know; Why do you say, “But it’s not REEFR”?
The kids on the Happy Board are all a-Twitter.

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To: DashernComet who wrote (118)10/1/2018 3:06:34 PM
From: StockDung
   of 168
 
Only 344,100 shares short. Down from 519,800


Research Frontiers Incorporated

$ 1.60

REFR
0.03

Short Squeeze Ranking™
view

Daily Short Sale Volume
view

Daily Naked Short Selling List
view

Short Interest (Shares Short)
344,100

Short Interest Ratio (Days To Cover)
2.9

Short Percent of Float
1.82 %

Short % Increase / Decrease
-34 %

Short Interest (Shares Short) - Prior
519,800

Shares Float
18,948,700

Trading Volume - Today
49,052

Trading Volume - Average
120,000

Trading Volume - Today vs. Average
40.88%

% Owned by Insiders
18.98%

% Owned by Institutions
13.86%

Earnings Per Share
-0

PE Ratio

Market Cap.

$ 38,400,635

% From 52-Wk High
-51.10%

% From 52-Wk Low

% From 200-Day MA
-8.64%

% From 50-Day MA
-6.39%

Sector
Services

Industry
Business Services

Exchange
NAS

Record Date
2018-SepB

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To: DashernComet who wrote (112)10/1/2018 3:54:11 PM
From: DashernComet
   of 168
 
So let me see if I got this right:

REEK lost $2.6 million in the last 12 months
REEK raised $3 million in the last 9 months
REEK revenue for the last 12 months was about $1.5 million
REK has about $4 million cash on hand right now—THAT is the good news
REEK has the same old management that has wasted $100 million over the past 30 years.
We do not know how the “Sweet Sport” was achieved
We do not know how much the. “Sweet Spot” amounted to
And Gauzy is a money burning, 9 year old company that can “invest” a $1 million into REEK
Gauzy has $5 million in revenues and has 60-70 employees (a fair estimate of labor cost would be $4 million)
And Gauzy sells PLDC

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To: DashernComet who wrote (120)10/1/2018 4:00:51 PM
From: DashernComet
   of 168
 
How much revenue does Gauzy generate?
Who are Gauzy competitors?
How many employees does Gauzy have?

owler.com

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From: StockDung10/12/2018 2:15:51 PM
1 Recommendation   of 168
 
Bank of America Merrill Lynch cracks down on risky securities with ban on penny stocks

The bank's Merrill Lynch division banned purchases of the risky securities in late July, and added restrictions to sales in September, according to sources.Starting Sunday, stocks priced under $5 per share from companies with a market capitalization under $300 million will be subject to a regulatory review, according to a copy of rules obtained by CNBC.Bank of America appears to be the first major wirehouse to restrict the purchase of penny stocks. Rivals Morgan Stanley and UBS still allow the trades in some instances.Penny stocks can easily be manipulated for fraudulent purposes, according to talking points distributed to Merrill Lynch brokers.

Hugh Son | Leslie Picker
Published 9:10 AM ET Fri, 28 Sept 2018 Updated 7:56 PM ET Fri, 28 Sept 2018 CNBC.com

Bank of America bans penny stocks 4:29 PM ET Fri, 28 Sept 2018 | 03:13

Penny stocks are no longer welcome at Bank of America's Merrill Lynch brokerage.

The company recently told clients it was changing its trading policy regarding penny stocks.

The bank's Merrill Lynch division banned purchases of the risky securities in late July, according to the people, who declined to be identified speaking about the move. About six weeks later, the bank abruptly said it was restricting clients' sales of penny stocks, then amended that policy to give financial advisers more time to exit positions, the people said.

Penny stocks, which the Securities and Exchange Commission defines as a small company trading for less than $5 a share and on an over-the-counter market, occupy a disreputable corner of financial markets. Since the shares are thinly traded away from major exchanges and face few disclosure requirements, they have for decades been a tool for fraudulent schemes. One common approach is the pump-and-dump where criminals hype a stock before exiting positions. That was the method Jordan Belfort, the so-called Wolf of Wall Street, used to enrich himself before getting caught.

Regulators have increasingly made their views of penny stocks known. The SEC's Division of Economic and Risk Analysis published a white paper in 2016 highlighting the risks of investing in over-the-counter markets. The majority of investors lose money in the trades, and losses worsened for stocks that were the subject of promotional campaigns and those that had weaker disclosures, the SEC said.

Bank of America is first
Bank of America appears to be the first major wirehouse to institute an outright ban on the purchase of penny stocks. While other firms have review processes for these riskier trades, it's still possible to buy penny stocks at Morgan Stanley and UBS, according to people with knowledge of those firms' policies.

The move is the latest example of Bank of America pulling back on potentially risky activities. CEO Brian Moynihan has spent much of his tenure spending billions of dollars securing settlements with regulators. He often repeats his "responsible growth" mantra, and signs of the impact of that strategy abound.

In February, the bank halted clients from using credit cards to purchase bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The firm's investment banking head, Christian Meissner, reportedly left earlier this month after clashing with Moynihan over the division's risk appetite.

Still, the policy shift around penny stocks at Bank of America has sown confusion among some of the firm's 17,442 financial advisers.

"We were told to get rid of them by a certain date," said one Merrill Lynch broker. "I called compliance today to say my client doesn't want to do that. Now they're telling me he doesn't have to sell, but it could be hard to get rid of it down the road."

After initially banning the sale of most penny stocks, the firm put the policy under review, allowing most of them to be sold for at least the time being, according to one of the sources. Only the riskiest penny stocks that already may be the target of fraudulent schemes — labeled with a skull-and-crossbones icon by the trading firm OTC Markets Group — can no longer be sold. Eventually, all penny stocks could fall under the restriction, the person said.

Clients who can no longer sell penny stocks through Merrill Lynch have to transfer them to another brokerage to liquidate the positions. Some clients have had difficulty selling their holdings at rival brokerages, which are beginning to place restrictions on the asset class, according to one of the people.

Under $5
The bank sent clients another letter earlier this month. Starting Sunday, stocks priced under $5 per share from companies with a market capitalization under $300 million will be subject to a regulatory review, according to a copy obtained by CNBC. Clients who want to sell "will experience a delay in execution" because of the review, the firm said.

The bank took steps regarding low-priced stocks "to ensure we are complying with Securities and Exchange Commission regulations and protecting the interests of our clients," said Jerry Dubrowski, a spokesman for the bank. "As a result, certain transactions may be subject to restrictions, trading prohibitions or other limitations."

Penny stocks are illiquid and can easily be manipulated for fraudulent purposes, according to talking points distributed to Merrill Lynch brokers. The asset class is rife with companies with shaky businesses. Other times, they are legitimate companies that have been delisted from major exchanges as they near bankruptcy.

Still, the high volatility of the asset class — in which shares worth a few pennies can rocket in value — invariably lures retail investors.

That happened in July 2014 with Cynk Technology, when a company with no discernible assets, revenue and a single employee surged from 6 cents a share to $21.95, or a market cap of more than $6 billion. The next year, a Canadian citizen named Philip Kueber was accused by U.S. authorities of engaging in a $300 million stock manipulation fraud.

According to the SEC's 2016 white paper, retired, low income and less-educated investors fared the worst with penny stocks. The agency analyzed 1.8 million trades by 200,000 investors, finding that the typical return is "severely negative."

WATCH: Here's why you should think twice before using your debit card

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