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   Technology StocksWDC, NAND, NVM, enterprise storage systems, etc.


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From: Sam7/2/2021 11:25:58 PM
   of 4716
 
Western Digital won’t fix a vulnerability found in older My Cloud OS3 storage devices
Igor Bonifacic·Contributing Writer
Fri, July 2, 2021, 5:28 PM·2 min read

Owners of Western Digital network attached storage (NAS) devices may have yet another security headache on the horizon. Following the two flaws hackers exploited to wipe My Book Live devices remotely, security journalist Brian Krebs has published a report on another zero-day vulnerability that affects Western Digital products running the company’s My Cloud OS3 software. What’s more, it doesn’t appear there will be an official fix for those who don’t upgrade to a newer storage solution.

Earlier in the year, security researchers Radek Domanski and Pedro Ribeiro discovered a series of weaknesses that allow a malicious actor to remotely update a My Cloud OS3 device to add a backdoor. The two say they never heard back from the company when they tried to contact it about the vulnerability. Western Digital attributes its response (or lack thereof) to one of its previous policies.

“The communication that came our way confirmed the research team involved planned to release details of the vulnerability and asked us to contact them with any questions,” a spokesperson for the company told Krebs. “We didn’t have any questions so we didn’t respond. Since then, we have updated our process and respond to every report in order to avoid any miscommunication like this again.”

While the flaw isn’t present in Western Digital's new My Cloud OS 5, it’s unclear if the company ever went back to address it in My Cloud OS3. What’s more, it no longer plans to support the older software. “We will not provide any further security updates to the My Cloud OS3 firmware,” Western Digital says in a support page dated to March 12th, 2021. “We strongly encourage moving to the My Cloud OS 5 firmware. If your device is not eligible for upgrade to My Cloud OS 5, we recommend that you upgrade to one of our other My Cloud offerings that support My Cloud OS 5.”

When Engadget reached out to Western Digital, a spokesperson for the company told us "there is a fix for this vulnerability — we 'patched' OS3 with OS 5." They added: "My Cloud OS 5 is a major security release that provides an architectural revamp of our older My Cloud firmware. All My Cloud products currently under active support are eligible for the My Cloud OS 5 upgrade and we recommend that all users upgrade as soon as possible to benefit from the latest security fixes."

If you own a device that you can't update to My Cloud OS 5, you can download a patch Domanski and Ribiro developed. One thing to note is you’ll need to reapply it each time you reboot your device. You can also protect your My Cloud NAS drive by limiting its access to the internet.

Update 6:35PM ET: Added comment from Western Digital.

finance.yahoo.com

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To: Sam who wrote (4674)7/5/2021 9:44:52 AM
From: Unwelcomeguest
1 Recommendation   of 4716
 
This isn't getting any better for WDC. A couple of hackers have posted a video describing exactly how to hack into one of the many drives using the OS3 software. Also, many users have complained that the 'upgraded' OS5 software has eliminated many of the features of OS3. WDC says that once the OS5 upgrade is implemented, users cannot go back to OS3, although the hackers found a way to do it.

Here is the link to the article with the embedded video. I watched a lot of it, but the technical hacking part was over my head. techtelegraph.co.uk

UWG

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From: Elroy7/8/2021 10:48:38 AM
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SIMO's revenues forecast to be about $220m in Q2 2021, up 20% sequentially

Q2 2020 sales were $138m, so year on year growth exceeds 50%

Amazingly, the share price is down on this good news! SIMO seems to be trading like a classic cyclical semi stock (sell the good news) despite that fact that it's a pure growth. and it should in fact show results counter the classic semi cycle results (when memory is in excess supply and memory prices are weak = the bottom of the semi cycle - SIMO should do great as their fundamentals are driven by number of devices which use memory, not the price of memory itself.

Anyways, when is WDC going to grow quarterly sales above 25% per year?

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To: Elroy who wrote (4676)7/8/2021 1:32:14 PM
From: SiliconAlley
2 Recommendations   of 4716
 
Anyways, when is WDC going to grow quarterly sales above 25% per year?

No one here cares about SIMO revenues.. Wake us when SIMO revenues reach $17 billion, and they achieve 25% growth on that.

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From: Elroy7/8/2021 3:58:17 PM
1 Recommendation   of 4716
 
I've got Silicon Alley on ignore, so I have no idea what he's posting.

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From: SSDiesel7/19/2021 12:43:17 PM
1 Recommendation   of 4716
 
youtu.be

Malaysian authorities seized bitcoin mining rigs

Upgrade opportunity!

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To: Elroy who wrote (4676)7/30/2021 2:34:03 PM
From: Elroy
   of 4716
 
SIMO now forecasting 2021 revenues to grow 65% to 70% (after growing 18% in 2020). 2022 is expected to be very strong as well. SIMO has 50% market share in the newest technology PCIe Gen4 SSD controllers.

Sales are going through the roof.

When is WDC going to grow sales by 65% to 70%? Oh, I forgot. Their long term revenue growth forecast is 4% to 8% per year. Ok, I guess that's pretty good.....

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To: Elroy who wrote (4680)8/2/2021 5:56:13 PM
From: Unwelcomeguest
   of 4716
 
Others disagree with you.
directorstalkinterviews.com

UWG

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To: Elroy who wrote (4680)8/2/2021 9:48:29 PM
From: SiliconAlley
   of 4716
 
SIMO now forecasting 2021 revenues to grow 65% to 70%

This is the WDC board. Please pump elsewhere.

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From: Bruno Cipolla8/4/2021 4:49:47 AM
   of 4716
 
Kioxia Demos HLC 3D NAND and Talks About OLC NAND
By Anton Shilov 7 days ago

Six or even eight bits per cell might be coming, eventually

Comments (3)



(Image credit: Kioxia)

The best SSDs currently use TLC or maybe QLC memory. Kioxia (formerly Toshiba Memory) was the first 3D NAND maker to start talking about 5-bits-per-cell (5 bpc) PLC (penta level cell) 3D NAND memory back in 2019. Kioxia's scientists and engineers certainly don't want to rest on their laurels, and this year they demonstrated operation of 6 bpc — hexa level cell, or HLC — 3D NAND memory and believe that even 8 bpc — octa level cell, or OLD — 3D NAND is possible. But there are some important nuances.

To store more than one bit per cell, NAND memory has to hold multiple distinct voltage levels in that cell. For example, MLC has four states per cell, TLC uses eight voltage levels, QLC has 16 voltage levels, and PLC has 32 voltage states. In other words, two taken to the power of whatever cell level you're talking about. To store six bits per cell (HLC), that cell has to hold 2^6, or 64 voltage levels.

To build 3D NAND with such cells, manufacturers have to overcome multiple challenges. They have to find the right materials that can handle storing 64 different voltage states, while also being able to differentiate between those states. That's means the voltage states can't interfere with each other. Keeping temperatures in check is also important and becomes increasingly difficult at higher bits per cell.

To demonstrate the possibility of HLC memory, Kioxia's scientists took one of the company's existing 3D NAND memory chips and immersed it in liquid nitrogen (77K, -196°C) to eliminate deterioration of the cells caused by rewrite cycles. The extremely low temperatures also help to reduce the need for tunnel insulating films, lower the voltage requirements, and stabilize the materials. All together, this improves the physical properties and processes that take place in the IC.

Kioxia's scientists said that they not only managed to write and read six bits of data from one cell and reliably hold it for 100 minutes, but they also were able to achieve a 1,000 program/erase (P/E) cycles endurance. Of course, that's largely thanks to the -196C temperatures. In normal conditions, endurance of 3D HLC NAND memory would be around 100 P/E cycles, according to its estimates. Kioxia presented results of the experiment at the 5th IEEE Electron Devices Technology and Manufacturing Conference (EDTM 2021) in April 2021 (presentation number: WE2P4-5), reports PC Watch.

3D PLC NAND has not been commercialized yet, and Western Digital (Kioxia's manufacturing partner) believes it will only make sense for some SSDs after 2025. Western Digital further claims that 3D PLC brings too many issues for a mere 25% density increase.

In contrast, 3D HLC NAND increases flash memory density by 50% compared to 3D QLC NAND, so it's more likely to be commercially feasible. Furthermore, scientists from Kioxia believe that even eight bits per cell OLC 3D NAND with 256 voltage levels is technologically possible. The task for scientists and developers now is to find the right materials, design, and controllers to make 3D HLC and 3D OLC NAND operational and commercially feasible at room temperatures.

If they fail, development of multi-level cell 3D NAND will stop at PLC and makers of flash will have to focus on increasing the number of layers in 3D NAND flash to increase memory density. Granted, Samsung and SK Hynix believe that 600 to 1,000 layers are feasible, which already opens the doors to very high capacity SSDs.

Even if Kioxia's scientists succeed in making HLC and OLC NAND work at room temperatures, they will also have to develop appropriate controllers that will be able to reliably read and write data from such flash memory. Such controllers will have to support extremely complex ECC algorithms that will require significant compute horsepower. Will such controllers be too expensive and offset the capacity advantages of 3D HLC and 3D OLC NAND? And what sort of performance could future HLC drives even offer? We already know that even QLC drives tend to perform rather poorly in heavier use cases. Only time will tell, but we don't expect TLC to fade away any time soon.

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