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   PoliticsCanada@The HotStove Club


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To: Wharf Rat who wrote (652)12/15/2018 2:18:13 AM
From: James Seagrove
   of 1199
 
Visit a prairie farmer.


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To: Wharf Rat who wrote (652)12/15/2018 2:19:57 AM
From: James Seagrove
   of 1199
 
Go birdwatching...


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To: Wharf Rat who wrote (652)12/15/2018 2:21:30 AM
From: James Seagrove
   of 1199
 
See Saskatoon!!!


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To: Wharf Rat who wrote (652)12/15/2018 2:26:33 AM
From: James Seagrove
   of 1199
 
Roll on down the Highway and have fun...



Roll On Down the Highway
Bachman–Turner Overdrive

We rented a truck and a semi to go
Travel down the long and the winding road
Look on the map, I think we've been there before
Close up the doors, let's roll once more

Cop's on the corner, look he's starting to write
Well, I don't need no ticket so I screamed out of sight
Drove so fast that my eyes can't see
Look in the mirror, is he still following me?

Look at the sign, we're in the wrong place
Move out boys and let's get ready to race
Four fifty-four's coming over the hill
The man on patrol is gonna give us a bill

The time's real short, you know the distance is long
I'd like to have a jet but it's not in the song
Climb back in the cab, cross your fingers for luck
We gotta keep moving if we're going to make a buck

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To: pocotrader who wrote (648)12/15/2018 3:24:54 AM
From: axial
2 Recommendations   of 1199
 
I think you nailed it —

'I don't know what Canada can do in this situation, forget about trading with China?,
just trade with the EU and other reasonable or true democratic countries.
ride out the storm until that idiot down south ruining everything he touches gets the boot.'

We'll just have to tough it out, IMO.

But while that's happening -- it'll be 5+ years -- I'm worried about political trends in Canada. The trend is Polarization - Populism. Rising hatreds and politically-driven antagonism— especially since the 2008 economic/financial crisis.

So far, Canada has withstood the extremism that's growing elsewhere in the world, but we've had a taste and it's being encouraged by political opportunists.
__________________________________________________

What’s gotten into the Liberals?

' A sense of mission is what. Gerald Butts, Trudeau’s principal secretary, has characterized the Liberal leader’s work these days as a struggle “to keep Canada Canada.” In early November, I asked a senior Liberal political staffer who’d moved to Ottawa from a provincial capital how he was enjoying the transition. “One thing I hadn’t expected was that we’d be fighting for Canada,” he said. “But we really are.” '


Jim

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To: James Seagrove who wrote (659)12/15/2018 3:54:14 AM
From: axial
3 Recommendations   of 1199
 
Mister Seagrove, your history tells ...





Your incoherent spam (a variant of toxic posts on the Canadian Political Free-for-All) has earned you this thread's first ban.

Congratulations.

Jim

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From: axial12/15/2018 4:21:47 AM
   of 1199
 
Johnson & Johnson knew for decades that asbestos lurked in its Baby Powder

' The earliest mentions of tainted J&J talc that Reuters found come from 1957 and 1958 reports by a consulting lab. They describe contaminants in talc from J&J’s Italian supplier as fibrous and “acicular,” or needle-like, tremolite. That’s one of the six minerals that in their naturally occurring fibrous form are classified as asbestos.

At various times from then into the early 2000s, reports by scientists at J&J, outside labs and J&J’s supplier yielded similar findings. The reports identify contaminants in talc and finished powder products as asbestos or describe them in terms typically applied to asbestos, such as “fiberform” and “rods.”

In 1976, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was weighing limits on asbestos in cosmetic talc products, J&J assured the regulator that no asbestos was “detected in any sample” of talc produced between December 1972 and October 1973. It didn’t tell the agency that at least three tests by three different labs from 1972 to 1975 had found asbestos in its talc – in one case at levels reported as “ rather high.”

Most internal J&J asbestos test reports Reuters reviewed do not find asbestos. However, while J&J’s testing methods improved over time, they have always had limitations that allow trace contaminants to go undetected – and only a tiny fraction of the company’s talc is tested.'

Jim

— Canada too, of course.

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To: James Seagrove who wrote (655)12/15/2018 10:16:15 AM
From: Wharf Rat
   of 1199
 
Already been to Jasper.

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From: axial12/16/2018 5:03:32 PM
   of 1199
 
As Russian economy & Putin’s popularity tumble, war drums grow louder


' Pavel Felgenhauer, a Moscow-based military analyst, said he sees evidence — including a buildup of troops and tanks along Russia’s border with Ukraine, and the deployment of new missile systems to Crimea — suggesting that Mr. Putin is at least considering a major military operation against Ukraine. In response to the buildup, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has declared martial law in 10 provinces, including all those that share a border with Russia, and called up some reserve soldiers for training exercises.

“Both sides are readying for a major regional war,” Mr. Felgenhauer said in an interview. “The situation is very precarious.”

[...]

Mr. Putin saw his popularity soar after both the seizure of Crimea in 2014 and Russia’s victory in a brief 2008 war with neighbouring Georgia. Some worry that he’ll be tempted to seek another such boost, with the Azov Sea — a strategic body of water between Russia and Ukraine — seen as a potential target this time.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has warned that a Nov. 25 incident near the entrance to the Azov Sea — which saw Russian warships fire on and then seize three Ukrainian military boats, taking all 24 crew members prisoner — could be a prelude to a larger Russian military move. While Mr. Poroshenko’s domestic rivals accuse him of exaggerating the threat in order to boost his own flagging political fortunes — polls suggest Mr. Poroshenko is on track to lose his job in a March election — military experts say there are reasons to take the Ukrainian president’s warning seriously. A report this week by the Institute for the Study of War, a Washington-based think tank, concluded that recent Russian troop movements suggest that “Russia is setting military conditions to prepare its forces for open conflict with Ukraine.”

Mr. Felgenhauer sees the same thing. The recent naval clash, he said, was significant because it was the first time Russia’s military — rather than a proxy force — had openly attacked Ukrainians. A video of the incident captured a Russian officer suggesting, in an expletive-filled rant delivered as his warship rammed a Ukrainian tugboat, that he and his men were acting on orders from Mr. Putin himself.

“They were shooting on orders from Putin,” Mr. Felgenhauer said. “That’s nasty and dangerous and means someone has gotten hysterical in the Kremlin.”

Alexander Mikhailov, a retired major-general who served in Russia’s FSB security service, told The Globe and Mail that he too expects the fighting in Ukraine to spike in the near future, though he said Russia did not need to get directly involved. He hinted that Russia could instead transfer more weapons and troops to the pro-Russian separatists, allowing them to break the stalemate that has seen the front line in eastern Ukraine remain largely static since 2015.'

Jim

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From: axial12/16/2018 5:09:06 PM
   of 1199
 
Punches thrown during anti-immigration protest in Edmonton

' Members of both the pro and anti-immigration groups wore yellow work vests Saturday, like demonstrators in France participating in ongoing protests against that country's high cost of living.

"Trudeau isn't supporting Canadians anymore," said demonstrator Taylor Mansfield. "He's supporting immigration too much."

Counter protestor Adebayo Katiiti vehemently disagrees with the anti-immigration argument.

"They don't know our stories. They're like 'Oh, go back where you're coming from.' That's white privilege," said Katiiti, who is originally from Uganda. "Racism is dangerous, and it's what they're representing."

Similar rallies were held Saturday in Calgary, Red Deer and Fort McMurray.'

Jim

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