SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology Stocks3D Printing


Previous 10 Next 10 
From: Savant6/25/2020 11:12:36 AM
   of 787
 
Eco-Friendly 3D Printed House Is Ready in 48 Hours and Lasts Up to 100 Years
interestingengineering.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant6/25/2020 11:22:02 AM
   of 787
 
Medical Engineers 3D Print Sensors Directly Onto A Moving Lung

iflscience.com

Video of printing @ link
If you’d finally got your head around the concept of 3D printing, it just got a whole lot weirder. In a groundbreaking feat of medical engineering, a team of scientists from the University of Minnesota have successfully used 3D-printing technologies to apply sensors to a moving lung. Using motion capture technology straight out of Hollywood, the researchers hope their breakthrough could have future applications in monitoring the heart and lung function of patients with illnesses such as Covid-19 where symptoms can be elusive. Their findings are published in the journal Science Advances.

While printing physical objects is old news, this is the first time sensors have been printed directly onto organs that warp in shape as they expand and contract. The invention is part of a new generation of 3D printing technologies and was discovered two years ago by scientists from the University of Minnesota. The same team was responsible for 3D printing directly onto the skin of a moving hand but have now taken their technique further by tracking moving organs like the lungs or heart. The technology successfully printed a functional sensor on the tissue’s surface by mapping the organ as it expanded and contracted.

"We are pushing the boundaries of 3D printing in new ways we never even imagined years ago," said Michael McAlpine, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering professor and senior researcher on the study, in a statement. "3D printing on a moving object is difficult enough, but it was quite a challenge to find a way to print on a surface that was deforming as it expanded and contracted."

Their creation began by testing on a balloon-like surface to understand the complexities of 3D printing on a changing platform. Using motion capture tracking markers, like those placed on anchors to improve special effects in cinema, the printer could map its printing path, taking into consideration the warping of the printing plane. Once successful with the balloon, they moved onto a porcine lung that was artificially inflated to mimic breathing. The technique successfully printed a hydrogel-based sensor onto the surface of the lung even as it “breathed”. McAlpine said the technique could also possibly be used in the future to 3D-print sensors on a pumping heart. The team hope the same approach can one day be applied to the lungs, heart, and other tissues of living patients to improve patient monitoring and wound treatment.

"The broader idea behind this research, is that this is a big step forward to the goal of combining 3D printing technology with surgical robots," said McAlpine in a statement. "In the future, 3D printing will not be just about printing but instead be part of a larger autonomous robotic system. This could be important for diseases like Covid-19 where health care providers are at risk when treating patients."

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant6/27/2020 11:45:43 AM
   of 787
 
more on 3D printed houses
rocagallery.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant6/30/2020 1:06:12 PM
   of 787
 
3D printed plant based steaks....Mmooooving your way
msn.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant7/14/2020 12:48:33 PM
   of 787
 
AI device identifies objects at the speed of light: The 3D-printed artificial neural network can be used in medicine, robotics and security, *AND automotive* Science Daily
They say $50
sciencedaily.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant7/14/2020 5:10:25 PM
   of 787
 
3D printed metal pistons for Porsche.. thedrive.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant7/17/2020 11:42:48 AM
1 Recommendation   of 787
 
Scientists 3D print gunpowder substitute, achieve 420m/s bullet velocity - 3D Printing Industry

3dprintingindustry.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant8/31/2020 6:14:23 PM
1 Recommendation   of 787
 
Trine Acquisition Corp.(stock symbol: (TRNE), a SPAC that raised $261 million when it went public in March 2019, has agreed to merge with Desktop Media, a manufacturer of 3D metal printing systems.

TRNE is trading at $11.60 per share this morning, up $1.46.

Desktop Metal to go public via reverse merger

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Axios
August 26, 2020

Desktop Metal, a Burlington, Massachussetts-based maker of 3D metal printing systems, agreed to go public via a reverse merger with Trine Acquisition, a SPAC formed last year by veteran telecom investor Leo Hindery. It would give Desktop Metal an initial market value of around $2.5 billion.

Why it matters: This was the result of a formal, bank-led auction among SPACs, CEO Ric Fulop tells Axios, without Desktop Metal also running a parallel IPO or private equity process. That's unusual, but likely to become more common as SPACs proliferate.

-- Trine will contribute $300 million via the merger, while Desktop Metal also secured $275 million via a $10 per share PIPE from Miller Value Partners, XN, Baron Capital Group, Chamath Palihapitiya, JB Straubel, and HPS Investment Partners.Desktop

-- Metal raised around $450 million in VC funding, most recently in early 2019 at a $1.5 billion valuation. Backers include Lux Capital, Ford, NEA, Kleiner Perkins, Koch Disruptive Technologies, GV, and GE Ventures.

The bottom line: "While the earlier boom in 3D printing focused on consumer printers that could spew out trinkets, today’s focus is industrial uses like automotive and aerospace where designs that could only be produced on such printers create more efficient parts with less weight," per Forbes.

axios.com
=======================
TRNE, which is acquiring Desktop Metal, a manufacturer of 3D printing systems, might merit a close look.

Investor presentation: sec.gov

The transaction includes a $275 million PIPE investment, led by Social Capital's Chamath Palihapitiya. Social Capital was the sponsor of the Virgin Galactic deal. This is very smart money.

Mr. Palihapitiya has written a one page document on what he likes about Desktop Metal.


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant9/12/2020 12:36:23 PM
3 Recommendations   of 787
 
Flying jet suit...about 24.4 min into the conference video, talks about 80% of the jet suit is 3D printed, shows some short clips

Testing the new flight suit out of doors, over water

youtu.be





Founder & Chief Test Pilot, Richard Browning flies onto stage at @Cisco Live Europe 2020 in front of 7000 and delivers the closing keynote. Watch as Richard shares the inspiration behind the #JetSuit and walks through the months of failures and setbacks on the innovation journey to reimagining human flight.

youtube.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Savant10/9/2020 12:07:58 PM
1 Recommendation   of 787
 
1st 3D printed house with earth
materialdistrict.com




Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10