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   Non-TechGraphene


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From: vitalremains11/11/2017 5:27:38 PM
   of 406
 
Zenyatta, Kuboki to develop plastic using graphene

2017-11-09 11:03 ET - News Release

Mr. Aubrey Eveleigh reports

ZENYATTA VENTURES AND WESTERN UNIVERSITY INITIATE A PROJECT TO DEVELOP GRAPHENE ENHANCED PLASTIC FOR THE AEROSPACE AND AUTOMOTIVE SECTORS

Zenyatta Ventures Ltd. has commenced a collaborative research project with Dr. Takashi Kuboki at Western University to develop an advanced plastic (polymer composite) using Zenyatta graphene (or graphene-oxide) derived from the Albany high-purity graphite deposit. An enhanced polymer composite material will be attractive to the automotive, aerospace and construction industries that seek lightweight materials with added strength, electrical and thermal properties. Graphene, a single sheet of carbon discovered in 2004 at the University of Manchester, is a new and exciting nanomaterial that can perform all of these functions.

The quickest, simplest and most effective way for commercializing large volumes of graphene is to combine it with existing products in the marketplace that need enhancement, like composite materials. Zenyatta recently announced significant success using its high-quality graphene to improve compressive and tensile strength of concrete in Israel and enhanced rubber composites in the United Kingdom. This new project may expand the company's business opportunities as a graphene nanomaterial supplier for the polymer composite markets also.

Zenyatta recently announced the easily exfoliation of Albany graphite via sonication to produce a consistent one- to four-layer graphene which was then homogenously dispersed into a concrete and rubber composite to improve performance. The dispersion quality of the graphene will be of paramount importance for boosting the performance of a polymer composite as well.

Aubrey Eveleigh, president and chief executive officer of Zenyatta, commented: "We continue to find that the unique properties of our graphite enable easy production of a consistent high-quality and easily dispersible graphene which is opening doors for new and important disruptive technologies, especially composites. Zenyatta recently achieved success demonstrating the use of its graphene in concrete and rubber composites with Dr. Oren Regev at Ben-Gurion University in Israel and Dr. Alan Dalton at University of Sussex in England. Using graphene in composites is considered 'low-hanging fruit' and the company will continue to play an increased and active role on collaborative research in this valuable sector."

Dr. Takashi Kuboki, assistant professor of mechanical and materials engineering at Western, commented: "During this research and testing project, injection moulded plastic will be manufactured using Zenyatta's graphene (or graphene oxide) as an additive. Many industries, including aerospace and automotive, are very important to Ontario and Canada. These sectors strive to adopt new technology components made from plastics or polymer composites to reduce weight and improve fuel efficiency but maintain strength. Also, graphene enhanced electrical properties of composites may protect against electrostatic discharge (i.e. lightning) while increased thermal properties are important for dissipating high temperature (i.e. heat sink in electronics)."

This project is receiving federal funding from the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Engage Grant program to allow a team of scientists under the direction of Dr. Kuboki at Western in London, Ont., Canada, to carry out this advanced nanomaterial research. There is a significant opportunity for the Canadian plastic and composite manufacturing industry to benefit from a high-quality graphene material located in Northern Ontario to produce new lighter, stronger, more thermally stable technology products. This can contribute to the global competitiveness of a leading-edge domestic industry to enhance the growth of the Canadian economy.

Mr. Eveleigh also stated: "We are very pleased to receive recognition and support from the Canadian NSERC Engage program which complements our various other collaborative research partnerships. The Albany project has the potential to produce high-purity graphite product that is converted to high-quality graphene. This material could lead to high-tech, value-added business opportunities to emerge in Ontario and Canada. On behalf of Zenyatta, I would like to thank the Canadian government for this important support in developing a novel product."

About Zenyatta Ventures Ltd.

Zenyatta is developing its large and unique Albany graphite deposit in Ontario, Canada. The company's highly crystalline (Igneous-type) graphite deposit is situated 30 kilometres north of the Trans-Canada Highway, power line and natural gas pipeline near the communities of Constance Lake First Nation and Hearst. A rail line is located 50 km away and an all-weather road approximately 10 km from the deposit.

Aubrey Eveleigh, PGeo, Zenyatta's president and CEO, is the qualified person for the purposes of National Instrument 43-101 and has reviewed, prepared and supervised the preparation of the technical information contained in this news release.

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To: vitalremains who wrote (386)11/11/2017 6:21:43 PM
From: vitalremains
1 Recommendation   of 406
 
NanoXplore now has US OTC listing (NNXPF-OTC)


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To: vitalremains who wrote (392)1/29/2018 7:27:40 PM
From: vitalremains
   of 406
 
Zenyatta to focus on graphene converted from Albany

2018-01-29 17:15 ET - News Release

Mr. Aubrey Eveleigh reports

ZENYATTA WILL FOCUS FUTURE EFFORTS ON VALUE-ADDED GRAPHENE CONVERTED FROM ALBANY GRAPHITE IN A VERTICALLY INTEGRATED STRUCTURE

Zenyatta Ventures Ltd.'s strategic focus is on the extraordinary nanomaterial called graphene, which is easily converted from the company's highly crystalline Albany graphite deposit. Graphene is emerging as the most promising new material in modern times for enhancing applications in various industries due to its unique combination of mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Graphene, a single sheet of carbon discovered in 2004 at the University of Manchester, can perform all of these functions.

During 2017, independent labs in Japan, United Kingdom, Israel, United States and Canada have demonstrated that Zenyatta's rare form of graphite easily converts (exfoliates) to graphene using a variety of simple mechanical methods. It has become apparent that the effort from these various collaborative programs has created significant additional value for the company's specific material. It is also important to note that the graphene produced by Zenyatta's partners is a consistent and high-quality nanomaterial, including the most desirable, monolayer to trilayer forms. The company's graphene also has excellent dispersion properties and therefore is highly suitable for enhancing present-day composite materials like rubber and concrete, as confirmed by the University of Sussex and the Ben-Gurion University, respectively. The composite material market represents a very-large-volume end use for graphene and graphene-oxide. A significant business opportunity has now evolved related to this graphene product, which currently sells at prices of thousands of U.S. dollars per kilogram*. The prior business model in the company's PEA (preliminary economic assessment) from 2015 included producing and selling high-purity graphite at $7.50 (U.S.) per kg.

Many corporate and academic R&D (research and development) facilities around the world are currently competing to find the most effective, cost-efficient and scalable process to produce high-quality graphene. These companies still require a consistent source (or precursor) material for conversion to graphene, which is then applied to their various products for enhancement. Zenyatta has a significant competitive advantage with the ownership of a large and high-quality supply of source material, Albany graphite, in Canada. The company is currently assessing the various simple graphene conversion methods being utilized on its high-purity graphite material by its network of collaborative partners. Zenyatta plans to source the appropriate equipment required for a graphene manufacturing (exfoliation) process and also evaluate the associated costs for graphene production in a vertically integrated structure.

Zenyatta will continue to focus on advancing the Albany graphite deposit toward production and will supply consistent, high-quality graphite or graphene to its wholly owned subsidiary ZEN-tech Materials Ltd. in a vertically integrated structure. The formation of ZEN-tech is a strategic move that will provide a downstream vehicle to market, capture value and advance graphene application development separate from the mineral development company.

Zenyatta Ventures is developing the 100-per-cent-owned Albany graphite deposit situated in Northeastern Ontario, Canada. The deposit is a large and unique type of igneous-hosted, fluid-derived mineralization containing highly crystalline graphite in two adjacent breccia pipes. The deposit is situated 30 kilometres north of the Trans-Canada Highway, power line and natural gas pipeline near the communities of Constance Lake First Nation and Hearst. A rail line is located 50 kilometres away with an all-weather road approximately 10 km from the deposit.

Aubrey Eveleigh, PGeo, Zenyatta's president and chief executive officer, is the qualified person for the purposes of National Instrument 43-101 and has reviewed, prepared and supervised the preparation of the technical information contained in this news release.

*Source: Applied Sciences Inc. and Future Markets Inc. (2017), table one: Graphene-mass-normalized price and nomenclature comparison in Graphene Magazine, April, 2017, issue No. 7, page 5.

We seek Safe Harbor.

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To: DanD who wrote (357)3/1/2018 4:26:55 AM
From: JitkaS4
1 Recommendation   of 406
 
That looks pretty good. There should be a very bright future for graphene based batteries. The industry is taking up speed already. Time to time I run into some interesting company ( example ), that is producing different nano-materials on industrial scale. Soon it is going to be in every product.

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To: DanD who wrote (376)4/2/2018 4:11:06 AM
From: garrettjax
   of 406
 
phys.org

Scientists develop graphene sensors that could revolutionise the Internet of Things
January 8, 2018, University of Manchester

Scientists develop graphene sensors that could revolutionise the Internet of Things
Credit: University of Manchester

Researchers at The University of Manchester have devised graphene sensors embedded into RFIDs, which have the potential to revolutionise the Internet of Things (IoT).

By layering graphene-oxide (a derivative of graphene) over graphene to create a flexible heterostructure the team have developed humidity sensors for remote sensing with the ability to connect to any wireless network.

Graphene was the world's first two-dimensional material isolated in 2004 at The University of Manchester, it is stronger than steel, lightweight, flexible and more conductive than copper.

Since then a whole family of other 2-D materials have been discovered and continues to grow.

Using graphene and other 2-D materials, scientists can layer these materials, similar to stacking bricks of Lego in a precisely chosen sequence known as van der Waals heterostructures to create high-performance structures tailored to a specific purpose.

As reported in Scientific Reports, the groundbreaking nature of this development is that such sensors can be printed layer-by-layer for scalable and mass production at very low cost. The device also requires no battery source as it harvests power from the receiver.

Sensors with a RFID enabler are at the heart of the IoT. This new development can provide various applications such as battery-free smart wireless monitoring for manufacturing processes that are sensitive to moisture, food safety, healthcare and nuclear waste.

Credit: University of Manchester
The developed technique has the potential to simplify how the information is gathered through its wireless system, nor is it is limited to a particular wireless network and has the ability to be compatible with networks including WiFi and 5G.

Dr. Zhirun Hu who led the work said, "The excitement does not end with this new application here, but leads to the future possibilities of integrations of this technique with other 2-D materials to open up a new horizon of wireless sensing applications."

Professor Sir Kostya Novoselov, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics and coordinated the project, added, "It is the first example of the printable technology where several 2-D materials come together to create a functional device immediately suitable for industrial applications. The Internet of Things is the fast growing segment of technology, and I'm sure that 2-D materials will play an important role there."

Explore further: Water-based, biocompatible 2-D inks for printed electronics

More information: Xianjun Huang et al. Graphene Oxide Dielectric Permittivity at GHz and Its Applications for Wireless Humidity Sensing, Scientific Reports (2018). DOI: 10.1038/

Read more at: phys.org

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From: DanD9/20/2018 4:13:51 PM
2 Recommendations   of 406
 

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From: DanD10/23/2018 1:00:42 PM
   of 406
 
Samsung’s Next Galaxy Phone Could Charge In 12 Minutes


Jesus Diaz ·

Freelance Writer

Updated Oct 23, 2018



According to alleged leaks posted on Chinese social network Weibo, Samsung may be really close to getting a graphene battery into a commercial phone — as early as 2019, the company claims. If true, this will be a revolution.
...

tomsguide.com

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To: DanD who wrote (398)10/23/2018 1:25:26 PM
From: DanD
   of 406
 
This is Samsung's own production method:

" Samsung has announced the development of a unique "graphene ball" that could make lithium-ion batteries last longer and charge faster. In fact, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) said that using the new graphene ball material to make batteries will increase their capacity by 45%"

graphene-info.com

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From: garrettjax8/12/2019 11:25:39 PM
   of 406
 
Just a quick note on something posted on a different thread mentioning Graphite and George Gilder in the same breath. Haven't read the book yet but it is ordered...

Message 32281375

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To: DanD who wrote (399)9/4/2019 12:49:15 PM
From: DanD
2 Recommendations   of 406
 
Looks like this has been pushed back to 2020 or 2021.

"Samsung is hoping to have at least one handset either next year or in 2021, I'm told, which will feature a graphene battery instead," tweeted Blass on Monday. "Capable of a full charge in under a half-hour, they still need to raise capacities while lowering costs."


cnet.com

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