SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Non-TechGraphene


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: DanD who wrote (306)3/12/2017 9:55:10 AM
From: DinoNavarre
2 Recommendations   of 419
 
Graphene-Based Transistor Opens Up Terahertz Spectrum
Posted By Dexter Johnson, IEEE Spectrum, Friday, March 10, 2017


Terahertz radiation represents a range of the electromagnetic spectrum extending from the highest frequency radio waves to the lowest frequency infrared light. While many attempts have been made to create compact, solid-state devices that can harness it, terahertz radiation has proven difficult to exploit.

However, if such devices can be developed that can tap into the terahertz spectrum, we could see it make a big impact in non-invasive imaging in industry, medicine and security where they are less harmful than X-rays and because of the shorter wavelength and provide sharper images than those produced by microwaves.

Graphene has begun to show some real promise in terahertz devices for everything from wireless communications to improved quantum cascade lasers that can reverse their emission, offering a complete change to fiber optic telecommunications.

Now researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), working with the Federal Polytechnic School in Zurich (ETHZ) and two Spanish research teams, have developed a technique, based on the use of graphene, that can potentially control both the intensity and the polarization of terahertz light very quickly.



The researchers believe that their research, which is described in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to the development of practical uses of terahertz waves to imaging and telecommunications. They key to their development was the fabrication of a graphene-based transistor adapted to terahertz waves.

Because the interaction between terahertz radiation and the electrons in graphene is very strong, the researchers believed that it should be possible to use graphene to manage terahertz waves. With this graphene-based transistor, the researchers believe this kind of control over a complete range of terahertz frequencies is now possible.

"By combining the electrical field, which enables us to control the number of electrons in graphene and thus allows more or less light to pass through, with the magnetic field, which bends the electronic orbits, we have been able to control not just the intensity of the terahertz waves, but also their polarization," said Jean-Marie Poumirol, a member of the UNIGE research team and the first author of the study, in a press release. "It is rare that purely electrical effects are used to control magnetic phenomena."

The researchers envision the graphene-based devices being used in communications and imaging.

"Using a film of graphene associated with terahertz waves, we should be potentially able to send fully-secured information at speeds of about 10 to 100 times faster than with Wi-Fi or radio waves, and do it securely over short distances," explained Poumirol.

The initial imaging applications are thought to be in security. Alexey Kuzmenko, team leader of the research at UNIGE added: “Terahertz waves are stopped by metals and are sensitive to plastics and organic matter. This could lead to more effective means of detecting firearms, drugs and explosives carried by individuals, and could perhaps serve as a tool to strengthen airport safety."

Graphene has begun to show some real promise in terahertz devices.....


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: vitalremains who wrote (338)3/17/2017 8:17:41 AM
From: vitalremains
   of 419
 
Saint Jean Carbon, University of Western Ontario to publish at ICNFA17 --------

2017-03-08 12:01 ET - News Release

Mr. Paul Ogilvie reports

SAINT JEAN CARBON SUPERCONDUCTOR PAPER TO BE PRESENTED AND PUBLISHED AT ICNFA17

Saint Jean Carbon Inc. and the University of Western Ontario's latest paper, titled "Deposition of YBCO Nanoparticles on Graphene Using Matrix-assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation," which is related to the development of thin superconductor by using graphene-based products, has been accepted for presentation and publication in the proceedings of International Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications (ICNFA17).

Dr. Jin Zhang, PhD, associate professor, department of chemical and biochemical engineering, University of Western Ontario, commented: "High-temperature superconductivity (HTS) brought significant breakthroughs in electric power technology, medicine, information technology. For decades, scientist and engineers have been taking great efforts to develop thin/ultrathin superconductors at high temperature which can achieve the high-energy-saving and ultrahigh-speed processing. The most challenges to develop thin/ultrathin HTS materials are related to identify the source of charge carrier, tailor the interface between different composites to enhance the current density, and, of course, an easy way to produce thin HTS materials. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple process to incorporate superconductive nanoparticles onto graphene sheets, the two-dimensional structures at nanoscale. This work could offer an alternative method to produce ultrathin HTS materials in an easy and controllable fashion."

Paul Ogilvie, chief executive officer of Saint Jean Carbon, commented: "We are really pleased when our work can stand out when there is so much other quality research going on around the world. Once the publication is issued, we will post the paper to our website. We continue to push the limits to what graphene can do, with the hope that the technology will find its way into all sorts of different applications."

About Saint Jean Carbon Inc.

Saint Jean is a publicly traded carbon science company, with specific interests in energy storage and green energy creation and green recreation, with holdings in graphite mining and lithium claims in Quebec, Canada.

We seek Safe Harbor.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: vitalremains who wrote (327)3/18/2017 10:19:14 AM
From: vitalremains
   of 419
 
Graphene 3D Lab develops carbon-silver adhesive, files patent

2017-03-09 09:29 ET - News Release

Mr. Daniel Stolyarov reports

GRAPHENE 3D LAB SECURES IP RIGHTS FOR LOW LOAD CARBON-SILVER CONDUCTIVE ADHESIVE

Graphene 3D Lab Inc. has completed the development of an innovative carbon-silver adhesive material and filed a provisional patent application to secure the intellectual property rights. This new material is a highly electrically conductive epoxy adhesive based on the proprietary combination of carbon and silver fillers, and other additives. The company is planning to add a product based on this formulation to the G6-Epoxy line of adhesives.

The key unique feature of this material is the low weight load of silver needed to achieve high electrical conductivity. According to results of internal testing, the volume resistivity of the material is 0.007 centimetre and can be achieved with a silver weight load as low as 40 per cent. Most commercially available silver-based adhesives typically require a 75-per-cent to 80-per-cent silver load by weight to attain conductivity.

Silver is currently priced near $550 (U.S.) per kilogram and is the major factor contributing to prices of silver-based adhesives ranging from $600 (U.S.) to $3,000 (U.S.) per kilogram. The company believes that the invented formulation that has a significantly lower silver content, while still providing similar levels of conductivity, will result in a product that will be well positioned to compete with current commercially available conductive silver-loaded epoxies.

In addition, the higher content of the epoxy polymer in the formulation of this product offers the additional competitive advantage of improved bond strength to a wide variety of substrates including glass, plastic and fabrics. Low load of fillers allows tailoring the formulation for better flexibility making this material well suited for wearables, smart textiles, sensor networks and medical devices.

The electrically conductive adhesives (ECA) market was estimated to be $1.2-billion (U.S.) in 2015 (according to IDTechEx) and is projected to reach an estimated $2.53-billion (U.S.) by 2021, a compound annual growth rate of 8.48 per cent from 2016 to 2021, according to the report by the market research firm MarketsandMarkets. ECAs are considered to be a replacement for traditional tin-lead solders, and their fast growing demand is driven by the increase in the use of electronic components in various industries such as aerospace, automotive, 3-D printing, consumer electronics and medical devices.

The company invites commercial enquiries for this product.

About Graphene 3D Lab Inc.

Graphene 3D Lab is a world leader in the development, manufacturing and marketing of proprietary composites and coatings based on graphene and other advanced materials. These diverse materials have a wide spectrum of commercial, research and military applications. The company's wholly owned subsidiary, Graphene Laboratories Inc., currently offers over 100 graphene and related products to a client list comprising more than 12,000 customers worldwide, including nearly every Fortune 500 tech company and major research university.

We seek Safe Harbor.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: vitalremains3/19/2017 10:19:21 AM
   of 419
 
McGill-born technology aims to revolutionize headphones, speakers
Montreal Gazette (Andy Riga) -- March 14, 2017
montrealgazette.com

ORA company website:
ora-sound.com


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: vitalremains3/19/2017 10:21:42 AM
1 Recommendation   of 419
 
Vorbeck Materials president appears on BBC World News


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: garrettjax3/23/2017 2:34:13 PM
1 Recommendation   of 419
 
They have skin in the game...
ca.news.yahoo.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


From: vitalremains3/25/2017 12:12:36 PM
   of 419
 
Posted by IBM Research --> Graphene nanosheets interact with E. coli cells

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: garrettjax who wrote (346)3/25/2017 12:16:42 PM
From: vitalremains
   of 419
 
Synthetic Skin Can Feel Thanks to Graphene


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: vitalremains3/25/2017 12:21:43 PM
   of 419
 
HEAD's "Graphene Touch" New Marketing Ad

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: vitalremains3/26/2017 11:19:12 AM
   of 419
 
Versarien PLC (LON:VRS) CEO Neill Ricketts interview at Momentous Events Graphene:



Versarien Business Model and Strategy:
versarien.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read
Previous 10 Next 10