SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  For example, here is how to disable FireFox ad content blocking while on Silicon Investor.

   Non-TechThe Brazil Board


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: The Black Swan who wrote (697)1/17/2012 10:24:51 AM
From: elmatador
   of 1846
 
Cerrado is a region with soil that needs correction. The group Agrirocha has been researching using surface rock/soil that can be used to correct poor soils. In a similar manner as acid soil can be corrected with limestone.

Carrado Agriculture The cerrado was thought worthless for agriculture until researchers at Brazil’s agricultural and livestock research agency, Embrapa, discovered that it could be made fertile by appropriate additions of phosphorus and lime. Researchers also developed tropical varieties of soybeans, until then a temperate crop. [25]

Today the "cerrado" region contributes more than 70% of the beef cattle production in the country ("Pecuária de Corte no Brasil Central"; Beef Cattle Production in Central Brazil, Corrêa, 1989), and thanks to irrigation and soil correcting techniques it is also an important production centre of grains, mainly soya, beans, maize and rice. Great extensions of "cerrado" are also utilised in the production of cellulose pulp for the paper industry, with the cultivation of several species of Eucalyptus and Pinus, but still as a secondary activity. Coffee produced in the Cerrado is now an important export. [26]

The region is increasingly threatened by single-crop monoculture plantations (particularly soybeans), the expansion of agriculture in general, and the burning of the vegetation for charcoal. Current knowledge on changes in carbon stocks upon land use conversion in the Brazilian Cerrado have been reviewed by Battle-Bayer et al. [27]

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Norman Borlaug described the Cerrado as one of Earth's last remaining arable frontiers for the expansion of agriculture. [28] The 2006 World Food Prize was awarded to former Brazilian Minister of Agriculture Alysson Paolinelli, soil scientist Edson Lobato (also of Brazil), and American soil scientist A. Colin McClung for their leadership in soil science and policy implementation that opened the Cerrado to agricultural and food production. [29]

In total, 37.3% of the Cerrado has already been totally converted to human use, while an additional 41.4% is used for pasture and charcoal production. The gallery forests in the region have been among the most heavily affected. It is estimated that about 432,814 km2, or 21.3% of the original vegetation, remains intact today. [30]

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: elmatador who wrote (698)1/17/2012 10:32:07 AM
From: The Black Swan
   of 1846
 
OK.. THX.. I am thinking about my NPK bet.. er.. investment.. :O)

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: elmatador who wrote (696)1/17/2012 11:19:07 AM
From: architect*
   of 1846
 
Thanks elmatador, I'll begin researching ANP's auction website and post any information I think is noteworthy.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)


To: architect* who wrote (700)1/17/2012 2:43:32 PM
From: elmatador
   of 1846
 
Why You Should Buy Brazil's Petrobras

I often get asked why I haven't been more positive about Brazil (EWZ). The answer is twofold; an upcoming election was about to bring a regime change in the high growth country, and there was a huge supply overhang from the upcoming secondary equity offering from Petrobras (PBR), the largest in history. That turned out to be a good call, with the main market dropping 6% so far in 2010, when most emerging markets were going to the moon. PBR has been a great short, dropping 31% from its peak.

Now Petrobras issue is done, and it is time to review the space. The company raised a staggering $70 billion, with the Chinese government coming in a major participant. The issue was priced so low that success was assured, despite its gargantuan size. Hedge funds and institutional investors whittled down their PBR weightings, hoping to cover their underweight on the deal. As the issue was generously oversubscribed, they are now scrambling to cover these shorts.

Petrobras will use the funds raised to develop their enormous Tupi offshore field, which is estimated to have 50 billion barrels of recoverable reserves. That will double the company's production to 3.9 million barrels a day by 2014, which is equivalent to 20% of American consumption. The company is well on its way to becoming the next oil major.

I think oil is a great place for the long term, and now is not a bad time to get in, as it has been one of the few underperforming commodities this year. I usually say buy the dips, but the dip in PBR has been going on for the past six months, so just buy now.

By. Mad Hedge Fund Trader

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: DewDiligence_on_SI who wrote (672)1/18/2012 5:31:40 AM
From: elmatador
   of 1846
 
Chevron just had another one:
Message 27887286

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: elmatador who wrote (702)1/18/2012 1:34:38 PM
From: DewDiligence_on_SI
   of 1846
 
For CVX, when it rains, it pours. Still, the share price is only slightly below its all-time high.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: elmatador1/19/2012 2:53:14 AM
   of 1846
 
Interest rate reduced to 10.5%
Brazil Signals Rate Cut Pace to Continue Amid European Crisis

Jan. 19 (Bloomberg) -- Brazil’s central bank signaled it will keep cutting interest rates at the current pace after it reduced borrowing costs by a half-point for a fourth straight meeting.

The bank’s board, led by President Alexandre Tombini, voted unanimously yesterday to reduce the benchmark rate to 10.5 percent, as forecast by all 67 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. In a statement identical to that after its two previous meetings, policy makers said “moderate adjustments” in the Selic rate will shield the world’s second-biggest emerging market from global turbulence without compromising their goal of lowering inflation to its 4.5 percent target this year.

Investors are likely to scrap bets that the bank will slow its easing cycle at its next meeting in March, said Andre Perfeito, chief economist at Gradual Investimentos. Deeper cuts than analysts are expecting will reinforce concerns that Tombini will fail to tame inflation as the government tries to sustain 4 percent growth, he added.

“The market is going to price in a greater concern about inflation,” said Perfeito, adding that he’ll likely revise his call for the bank to end its easing cycle in March. “It’s obvious that they’re going to do another half-point cut and at least one more after that, which could be smaller.”

Brazil has taken the lead among emerging markets in cutting borrowing costs as the economy shrank in the third quarter for the first time since 2009. The country’s surprise interest rate cut in August, the first in two years, has since been followed by policy makers in Russia, Indonesia, Chile and Israel.

Rebound Signs

The strategy has helped bolster consumer spending as Europe struggles to contain its debt crisis, reducing demand for emerging market assets. Early signs of a rebound prompted some economists to predict Tombini would soon shift his focus to inflation that was 6.5 percent last year, the fastest year-end reading since 2004.

Traders were split yesterday on whether the central bank would cut the benchmark rate by 25 or 50 basis points at their next policy meeting in March, according to Bloomberg estimates based on interest rate futures.

Even before yesterday’s statement, analysts had expected Tombini to fail in his pledge to bring inflation back to target this year and in 2013. Economists forecast that the central bank will reverse course next year and start raising rates again, as consumer prices rise 5.3 percent this year, and 5 percent in 2013, the bank’s Jan. 13 survey shows.

Stimulating Growth

President Dilma Rousseff’s administration has cut taxes and eased restrictions on consumer credit to boost growth, though expects the majority of stimulus to come from monetary policy. Her Finance Minister, Guido Mantega, said last month that government will try to ensure the economy expands 4 percent this year.

Signs that growth has picked up since the third quarter won’t change the bank’s course of action, said Alberto Ramos, a senior Latin America economist at Goldman Sachs Group Inc. in New York. Brazil’s economic activity index, a proxy for gross domestic product, expanded at its fastest pace in 19 months in November, reversing a three-month contraction.

“The slight rebound in GDP is not strong enough for them to adopt a slightly more hawkish stance,” said Ramos in a phone interview. “The world is too risky and uncertain for them to signal right now they are about to change the pace.”

Retail Sales

Consumer spending is being fueled by 18 percent credit growth and a record low unemployment rate of 5.2 percent. A surge in investment as Brazil prepares to host the 2014 World Cup and the government’s decision to raise some pension payments by 14 percent this year are also pumping cash into the economy.

Retail sales rose 1.3 percent in November, the fastest pace in 15 months. Cia. Brasileira de Distribuicao Grupo Pao de Acucar, the country’s biggest retailer, reported that same-store sales rose 8.5 percent in the fourth quarter from the year before, while shopping-center operator BR Malls Participacoes SA saw same-store sales rise 8.8 percent during the same period.

The interest-rate cuts have also helped fuel a 26 percent rally in the Bovespa stock index since the benchmark gauge hit a two-year low on Aug. 8.

To be sure, analysts will need to wait the release of the minutes to yesterday’s meeting on Jan. 26 to confirm that the bank will stick to its current plan, said Jankiel Santos, chief economist in Sao Paulo for Espirito Santo Investment Bank.

Rate Outlook

Economists in the Jan. 13 central bank survey forecast that the Selic will fall to 9.5 percent by the end of the year. Brazil’s inflation-adjusted interest rate of 4 percent is the highest in the Group of 20 nations.

The bank’s leeway for further cuts also depends on Rousseff’s ability to contain spending, Gustavo Rangel, chief Brazil economist for ING Financial Markets in New York, said by phone before the rate decision.

The government is expected to announce in the coming weeks a series of budget cuts that, if not big enough, could make it harder to meet its goal of delivering a budget surplus before interest payments equal to 3.1 percent of GDP this year.

Since Tombini’s first rate cut in August, economists have reduced their forecast for growth this year to 3.27 percent from 3.90 percent in weekly bank surveys. The International Monetary Fund forecasts growth of 3.6 percent this year, slower than Russia, China and India, the other so-called BRIC nations. In 2010, Brazil grew 7.5 percent, its fastest pace in two decades.

Brazil’s economy shrank 0.17 percent on an annualized basis in the third quarter, the first contraction since the collapse of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. in 2008, while industrial output has fallen for five of the last eight months.

The yield on the interest rate futures contract maturing in January 2013, the most traded in Sao Paulo, declined yesterday seven basis points, or 0.07 percentage point, to 9.99 percent. The real has gained 5.4 percent to 1.7671 per U.S. dollar this year, the best performer among 16 major currencies tracked by Bloomberg.

--With assistance from Dominic Carey in Sao Paulo. Editors: Joshua Goodman, Andre Soliani

To contact the reporter on this story: Matthew Bristow in Brasilia at mbristow5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Joshua Goodman at jgoodman19@bloomberg.net

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: elmatador1/21/2012 6:42:18 AM
   of 1846
 
Over the past two years, Brazilians, Argentines, Venezuelans and Mexicans have helped revive the real estate market in south Florida, one of the hardest hit by the mortgage crisis that punished much of the U.S. in 2008.

“From a real estate point of view, south Florida depends on the Latin American market,” Edgardo Defortuna, one of the founders of Miami-based Fortune International Realty, told The Associated Press late last year.

Walter Molano of the PCP Securities investment bank said that for many Latin Americans, property in Miami costs less than in their home countries.

“Miami is less expensive than many capitals especially Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro and in some cases Bogota, Buenos Aires and Santiago,” Molano said last year.

Brazilian state-run bank buys Florida-based bank to expand operations in US

By Associated Press, Published: January 20

BRASILIA, Brazil — Brazil’s largest state-run bank has purchased Florida-based EuroBank in its first foray into the United States.

The Banco do Brasil said in a statement Thursday that it paid $6 million for all of EuroBank’s shares.

The statement says the acquisition will help Banco do Brasil “expand its operations in the United States, especially among the Brazilian and Hispanic communities.”

EuroBank has branches in Coral Gables, Pompano Beach and Boca Raton.

The Brazilian bank said EuroBank will undergo a “transition phase” that includes the changing of its name to Banco do Brasil Americas. Services to EuroBank’s current clients will not be interrupted, it said.

It is the second time Banco do Brasil has acquired a bank outside Brazil, spokeswoman Ana Cecilia Dornelles said. In 2010, Banco do Brasil purchased a controlling stake in Argentina’s Banco Patagonia for $479.6 million.

EuroBank said on its website that Banco do Brasil will “cooperate in the development of the communities where the bank is located and will provide products and services like checking accounts and savings accounts, debit and credit cards, domestic and international funds transfers, and internet banking.

Over the past two years, Brazilians, Argentines, Venezuelans and Mexicans have helped revive the real estate market in south Florida, one of the hardest hit by the mortgage crisis that punished much of the U.S. in 2008.

“From a real estate point of view, south Florida depends on the Latin American market,” Edgardo Defortuna, one of the founders of Miami-based Fortune International Realty, told The Associated Press late last year.

Walter Molano of the PCP Securities investment bank said that for many Latin Americans, property in Miami costs less than in their home countries.

“Miami is less expensive than many capitals especially Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro and in some cases Bogota, Buenos Aires and Santiago,” Molano said last year.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: elmatador1/22/2012 3:08:18 AM
   of 1846
 
Petrobras replaces CEO Gabrielli, will be replaced by Maria das Graças Foster

Brazilian state-controlled oil company Petrobras ( PETR4.SA)( PBR.N) ousted chief executive Jose Sergio Gabrielli, the man who oversaw the discovery of the largest oil find in the Americas in decades, local media reported on Saturday.

Gabrielli will be replaced by Maria das Graças Foster, a Petrobras executive close to Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, GloboNews cable TV channel reported.

Foster is currently the head of Petrobras' gas and energy unit.

Gabrielli's replacement has been rumored for months, with talk of an expected Cabinet reshuffle fueling speculation about his departure.

The Boston University-trained economist had been at the helm of Petrobras since 2005. During his stint, the company found the so-called subsalt region, the biggest oil find in the Americas in more than three decades.

He also guided Petrobras through the largest-ever share offering of some $70 billion late in 2010.

The federal government, which together with state entities, holds a combined 48-percent stake in the oil producer's capital and is Petrobras' largest shareholder.

Calls to the ministry of oil and energy, the presidency and the company, which headquarters are located in Rio de Janeiro, were not answered.

(Reporting by Leonardo Goy and Guillermo Parra-Bernal; Additional reporting by Jeb Blount in Rio de Janeiro; Editing by Xavier Briand)

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: elmatador who wrote (706)1/22/2012 2:37:48 PM
From: Spekulatius
3 Recommendations   of 1846
 
>>Gabrielli will be replaced by Maria das Graças Foster, a Petrobras executive close to Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, GloboNews cable TV channel reported.<<

More political cronies in PBR's top management - PBR looks more and more like PDVSA.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)
Previous 10 Next 10 

Copyright © 1995-2018 Knight Sac Media. Data provided by IEX, Alpha Vantage, Coinbase, Binance, Fintel and CityFALCON News - See Terms of Use.