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   PastimesHeart Attacks, Cancer and strokes. Preventative approaches


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To: ig who wrote (34108)8/30/2018 12:18:13 PM
From: RMP
   of 36840
 
Thanks for posting this. I completely agree.

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To: Alan Smithee who wrote (34107)8/30/2018 2:53:17 PM
From: Neeka
   of 36840
 
My BP is regularly around 100/70 and I get light headed quite a lot. I've done on line searches, and still don't have a clue what's going on?

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To: Neeka who wrote (34110)8/30/2018 3:17:23 PM
From: D. Long
   of 36840
 
Kristel has very low BP, too. Same thing.

Not much to do about it, I understand. Our GP told her to eat as much salt as she wants, in his very dry humor style.

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To: mel221 who wrote (34103)8/30/2018 3:19:21 PM
From: D. Long
   of 36840
 
I had to get off it. I couldn't even walk down the driveway without getting breathed.

Amlodopine has been better for me. No lightheadedness or fatigue.

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To: D. Long who wrote (34111)8/30/2018 3:37:49 PM
From: Neeka
   of 36840
 
My doc said the same thing. We just have to live with it.

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To: Neeka who wrote (34110)8/30/2018 5:44:49 PM
From: w0z
   of 36840
 
My BP is regularly around 100/70 and I get light headed quite a lot. I've done on line searches, and still don't have a clue what's going on?


I have naturally low blood pressure (no drugs). It's always been a minor problem, especially in hot weather if I squat down and then stand up too quickly. I've always speculated that with low BP, quickly standing increases flow downhill and decreases flow uphill (i.e. the brain). That's a simple minded speculation from an engineer, not a doctor. BTW this is why pilots wear a special suit that constricts the body during high-G maneuvers to prevent blackouts caused by blood draining from the brain.

Here's a medical explanation for the condition:

healthline.com

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To: w0z who wrote (34114)8/30/2018 5:57:15 PM
From: Neeka
   of 36840
 
My dizzy spells can happen any time, and I really don't have a problem when standing up. The dizzy spellls usually occur while I'm sitting down.

I had 3-4 episodes of Vasovagal Syncope when I was younger. Usually while taking a shower. My son would faint at the sight of blood when he was really young, and had an episode several years ago and crashed through the glass shower door.

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From: RMP8/31/2018 12:14:26 AM
3 Recommendations   of 36840
 
Beware of “Skinny Fat”—a New Dementia Risk

For most people, losing muscle mass as they get older is as natural as going gray. But unlike the silver streak in your hair, reduced strength and muscle mass may signal a dangerous risk—especially if you’re carrying extra body fat.

Background: We’ve long known that loss of muscle mass (a condition known as sarcopenia) is bad for our health, increasing our risk for falls and a loss of physical independence. It’s also widely known that being overweight or obese sets us up to develop heart disease, diabetes and other chronic ailments.

When it comes to brain health, research has also shown that sarcopenia and obesity are independently linked to cognitive impairment. Exception: In people over age 70, extra body weight seems to protect against dementia, for reasons that aren’t fully understood.

With this evidence in hand, researchers wanted to learn how the combination of sarcopenia and obesity affects one’s risk for various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer disease.

To study this question, researchers took precise body measurements and performed a thorough cognitive assessment on 353 adults, with an average age of 69. The researchers then determined which of the participants had sarcopenia and were also obese based on their percentage of body fat mass—a condition known as sarcopenic obesity or “skinny fat.” Interestingly, the “skinny” term comes into play because people with sarcopenic obesity tend to look less overweight than those who are simply obese.

In analyzing the data, researchers had to contend with some tricky definitions that are used for both sarcopenia and obesity. Traditionally, sarcopenia has been defined as low muscle mass. Now, some experts also include low muscle function in the definition—as determined, for example, by grip strength. Obesity, too, has been defined various ways. The conventional definition is tied to body mass index (BMI), which is the ratio of a person’s weight-to-height…or it can be defined based on the percentage of body fat.

Study results: Adults who could be described as “skinny fat”—that is, they had sarcopenia, defined by the combination of low muscle mass and low muscle strength, along with a high percentage of body fat—were the most likely to have lower cognitive function. The combination of those features was more strongly linked to cognitive decline, followed by sarcopenia alone and then obesity alone.

Takeaway: Maintaining muscle strength while preventing excess body fat may help protect your cognitive ability as you get older.

If you want to build muscle strength, read here for simple ways to get started. It’s easier than you think!

Source: The study “Sarcopenic Obesity and Cognitive Performance” led by researchers at Florida Atlantic University Comprehensive Center for Brain Health in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine in Boca Raton, Florida, and published in Clinical Interventions in Aging. Date: August 6, 2018 Publication: Bottom Line Health

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To: RMP who wrote (34116)8/31/2018 5:52:19 AM
From: w0z
   of 36840
 
If you want to build muscle strength, read here for simple ways to get started. It’s easier than you think!


Thanks for posting that link! Very timely as I began an exercise program a couple of months ago to offset my age 73 related muscle loss...excellent, practical article.

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To: w0z who wrote (34117)8/31/2018 8:18:52 AM
From: John Carragher
6 Recommendations   of 36840
 
i joined a gym and got a trainer in the last three months. what a difference i am gaining back the muscle loss using machines a couple times a week.Last month I saw a trainer for 2 hours a week. He worked me through stretching exercises, other non weight exercises. Basically taught me how to get my core back, put my shoulders back and straighten up. I have two hours of training left then will work out based on his instructions and machines. My purpose was get back my strength to hike in banff ca area for a week.

at 75 i am more flexible and feel great.

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