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   PastimesSevere Weather and the Economic Impact


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To: johnlw who wrote (5403)10/31/2019 11:37:41 AM
From: Drygulch Dan
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There’s room for you guys too! Bring em all down, we’ve got sun, ya’ll can die early of skin cancer too!

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To: EL KABONG!!! who wrote (5402)10/31/2019 8:05:14 PM
From: LoneClone
   of 5780
 
Much of Florida, the Carolimas, and the Gulf Coast will likely also become unlivable over the next few decades due to increased hurrican activity and ocean level rise. If I have interpreted the affected populations correctly, there will be many more Republican voters displaced than Democrats.

Then there are the desert states like Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, and much of Texas which will likely lose much of their water supplies and likewise become uninhabitable.

An interesting aspect to keep track of...

LC

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To: LoneClone who wrote (5406)11/1/2019 1:20:56 AM
From: Drygulch Dan
1 Recommendation   of 5780
 
This is rather wild speculation with very little logic to support it. consider that Nevada is down stream from much of the Sierra water flow. Yet also has very low population, How does that work out ? The two major population centers Reno and Vegas are close to major river flows and benefit from both respectively.

Sea level rise is on a slow track of about 3.5 millimeters. Per year. At that rate no one alive today would live to see much ocean incursion in Florida much less states north of there. In 100 years or so maybe someone somewhere might built a sea wall barrier to protect an area. It’s been done before elsewhere. I wouldn’t lose any sleep over that matter. Speaking of hurricanes, records of these go back quite a few hundred years as we know that name came from the indigenous people of the Caribbean islands in the time of Columbus. So back to the little ice age period at least. And there’s probably some scientific studies that have identified indications of these types of storms going back thousands of years. It will take a lot to drive the v out of the south, probably something on the order of trying to drive the Canadians out of the bush.

I have lived in Florida, Mississippi, Nevada besides Calif and Oregon. I have visited most of the rest of the states you mention. Weather is different in all those places. Good thing humans are an adaptable species.

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To: Drygulch Dan who wrote (5407)11/1/2019 2:35:04 PM
From: LoneClone
1 Recommendation   of 5780
 
What happens if, of maybe better when, when the snow packs disappear from the mountains that feed the rivers? This is the same possibility that the residents of the Canadian provinces east of the Rockies are refusing to even consider.

The figure you cite for sea level rise is the global figure; local conditions normally make the effective rise at least double that. And of course water expands at it warms, exacerbating the problem. Throw in ever more powerful hurricanes and the situation becomes dire for the areas I mentioned. Once the salt water gets in...

Yes, I was speculating, given that I am talking about the future. People has been criticizing me for my pessimistic outlook on the environment for decades, but in almost every case it has unfortunately turned out that I wasn't pessimistic enough.

LC

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To: LoneClone who wrote (5408)11/1/2019 6:12:45 PM
From: Drygulch Dan
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With regard to snow in the mountains you have to consider dry adiabatic lapse rates. Hint, these are not your friends.

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From: LoneClone11/1/2019 7:04:44 PM
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Big storm in Quebec -- lots of flooding and more than a million (!) homes without power at present.

LC

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To: LoneClone who wrote (5410)11/1/2019 7:14:45 PM
From: Old_Sparky
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Big storm in Quebec -- lots of flooding and more than a million (!) homes without power at present.

But looking on the bright side, they don't have any dirty oil pipelines that might be leaking. My schadenfreude is overflooding also.

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To: Old_Sparky who wrote (5411)11/2/2019 6:59:31 PM
From: LoneClone
   of 5780
 
Your post was highly inappropriate for this collegial board.

While you are contemplating that, you can rejoice that there are still half a million without power, including infants, the elderly, the inform etc. Does that make you fell good?

LC

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To: Drygulch Dan who wrote (5409)11/2/2019 7:05:34 PM
From: LoneClone
   of 5780
 
Thanks, that was really interesting.

Lest you misconstrue me, I would be very happy if the dire predictions I have been making for some decades stopped coming to pass, but alas, the odds are that I will continue to follow in the footsteps of Cassandra.

LC

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To: LoneClone who wrote (5412)11/2/2019 7:50:26 PM
From: Old_Sparky
   of 5780
 
As someone famously said 40 years ago " Let the virtue signaling eastern bastards freeze in the dark " They love to flaunt their hydro power as being so green and renewable. Well now they have too much hydro and not enough power. Karma is a bitch.

this thread is intended for discussion of severe weather events and any related economic impact.

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