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   PastimesSevere Weather and the Economic Impact


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To: LoneClone who wrote (5410)11/1/2019 7:14:45 PM
From: Old_Sparky
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Big storm in Quebec -- lots of flooding and more than a million (!) homes without power at present.

But looking on the bright side, they don't have any dirty oil pipelines that might be leaking. My schadenfreude is overflooding also.

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To: Old_Sparky who wrote (5411)11/2/2019 6:59:31 PM
From: LoneClone
   of 5736
 
Your post was highly inappropriate for this collegial board.

While you are contemplating that, you can rejoice that there are still half a million without power, including infants, the elderly, the inform etc. Does that make you fell good?

LC

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To: Drygulch Dan who wrote (5409)11/2/2019 7:05:34 PM
From: LoneClone
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Thanks, that was really interesting.

Lest you misconstrue me, I would be very happy if the dire predictions I have been making for some decades stopped coming to pass, but alas, the odds are that I will continue to follow in the footsteps of Cassandra.

LC

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To: LoneClone who wrote (5412)11/2/2019 7:50:26 PM
From: Old_Sparky
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As someone famously said 40 years ago " Let the virtue signaling eastern bastards freeze in the dark " They love to flaunt their hydro power as being so green and renewable. Well now they have too much hydro and not enough power. Karma is a bitch.

this thread is intended for discussion of severe weather events and any related economic impact.

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To: Drygulch Dan who wrote (5409)11/2/2019 10:28:11 PM
From: johnlw
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Dan
Just curious, was the dry adiabatic lapse rate something you and Weir mulled over in the parking lot while sneaking a butt?

On a more local note I picked up my pass and got a few creaky turns in today. Earliest I’ve ever ridden a lift according to the calendar. The ponds and small lakes in the Bow Valley are frozen over and filled with skaters and shinny games. Should have thrown the skinny skis in as well and gotten some klicks in on Frozen Thunder as well at the Nordic centre. Feels like the glaciers have held off disappearing for another season.
My sympathies out to the farmers in the last couple hundred km of the drive here with the tens of thousands of acres of snow laden unharnessed crops. The global warming thing is a bitch for them.

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To: johnlw who wrote (5415)11/3/2019 11:43:21 AM
From: Drygulch Dan
   of 5736
 
I was at Tahoe yesterday turning on my winter heat to avoid the frozen pipe syndrome. I doubt Weir is familiar with the concept. I came across it back when I started flying gliders in the late 1970s. Ya get to notice its affects at altitude. Just another form of getting high.

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From: LoneClone11/8/2019 6:23:39 PM
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As you may recall, we had an unprecedented spring drought in southern BC earlier this year lasting almost two months. Well, just coming to an end is a record-setting fall drought, fortunately much shorter, consisting of 13 straight days without rain. Millions of salmon, milling around at river and stream mouths waiting for more water so they can spawn, will shortly be doing their duty.

The extreme events continue to mount up.

LC

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To: LoneClone who wrote (5417)11/9/2019 7:03:53 PM
From: Old_Sparky
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'Well, just coming to an end is a record-setting fall drought, fortunately much shorter, consisting of 13 straight days without rain. "

Okay now you are just trolling me. Any other place on earth ,13 days without rain is not a drought. Its nice weather.

Just be happy you are not spending time here this weekend.

https://www.blazingcatfur.ca/2019/11/09/alberta-will-be-one-of-the-coldest-places-on-earth-this-weekend-weather-network/

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To: Old_Sparky who wrote (5418)11/9/2019 7:41:36 PM
From: LoneClone
1 Recommendation   of 5736
 
Since it has not happened before in the time since we started keeping records, I thought it was noteworthy. I can't verify this, but someone told me it was the first dry Hallowe'en in Vancouver in 18 years.

Although I have not lived in Alberta since I was 4, I have experienced snow in Calgary in all 12 months, so nothing surprises me about your weather.

One time I was playing in the Canadian Ultimate Championships in Calgary in early August. At halftime I looked around and noticed it was simultaneously sunny, raining, very windy, hailing, and sleeting, with thunder and lightning off in the distance -- lots of weather!

We are back to a normal November here now -- it is raining and windy. I'll take that over cols any day.

LC

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From: johnlw11/16/2019 12:03:47 PM
1 Recommendation   of 5736
 

Millions of acres of canola freeze on Canada's Prairies, compounding 'harvest from hell'





This year will be remembered as the "harvest from hell," said farmer John Guelly, chairman of the Alberta Canola industry group.

Reuters
Updated: November 15, 2019

Heavy snow and rain during harvest on the Canadian Prairies have left several million acres of canola buried until spring, the latest blow in a miserable year that may compound farmer problems into 2020.

Canola is renowned as Canada’s most profitable crop, exported to China, Japan and Mexico to make vegetable oil and animal feed. But in March, Beijing revoked the licenses of Canadian exporters Richardson International and Glencore Plc’s agriculture unit, Viterra Inc, slowing China’s overall purchases amid a broader diplomatic dispute.

Heavy snow and rain during harvest on the Canadian Prairies – including this canola field east of Cremona, Alta., on Nov. 5, 2019 – have left several million acres of canola buried until spring, the latest blow in a miserable year that may compound farmer problems into 2020. Mike Drew / Mike Drew/Postmedia

Canola futures are down three per cent year over year in the world’s biggest canola-growing country despite severe harvest problems that normally would lift prices, adding further pressure to declining farm incomes.

This year will be remembered as the “harvest from hell,” said farmer John Guelly, chairman of the Alberta Canola industry group. Canola’s problems may even frustrate some from sowing it next year, he said.

“I think there will be a pullback in acres for sure.”

In Alberta, 17 per cent of canola was unharvested as of Nov. 5, according to the provincial government, along with 12 per cent of Saskatchewan’s canola and nine per cent of Manitoba’s output measured around the same time. Based on Canadian government planting estimates, that unharvested canola represents some 2.7 million acres, or 13 per cent of national plantings.

Some harvesting occurred after the latest provincial estimates, but the volume of unharvested crops looks to be the most in three years, said Shawn Jaques, chief executive of Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corp.

Crops that remain in fields over the winter are subject to wildlife damage and to spoilage, but some of it can usually be salvaged at a discount.

Needing to harvest the previous crop once fields dry in spring can delay farmers from planting the next crop, however.

“There is palpable frustration,” said Curtis Rempel, vice-president of crop production at the Canola Council of Canada. “The fall was so tough for so many growers and right now people are still thinking about, ‘what does my spring look like in terms of harvesting?’”

Nov. 15 was the deadline for farmers in Saskatchewan and Alberta, the two biggest canola-growing provinces, to file insurance claims. Collecting is an uncertain process, however, and many farmers count on their last harvested acres to make up their profit margin once expenses are paid, said Todd Lewis, president of Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan.

This year has been “very long, very frustrating,” said Lewis. “It’s really hitting guys in the pocketbook.”
thestarphoenix.com


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