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To: Sun Tzu who wrote (5776)5/8/2020 2:31:52 PM
From: The Ox
   of 5824
 
No, I don't think your missing anything. S+P adjusts it's criteria based on market data as well.

I was more thinking about some major reshuffling of the indexes and the big fish swallowing the little ones...

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To: The Ox who wrote (5777)5/8/2020 2:39:20 PM
From: Sun Tzu
   of 5824
 
Wait for the financials to rally before expecting any M&A. As I see it, if they don't join the party in at most a few weeks, then the whole market is in danger. But for now, party on!

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From: The Ox5/11/2020 11:11:48 AM
1 Recommendation   of 5824
 
New update includes FAANG and QQQ Nasdaq 100 - top 20 by mkt cap

Message 32728508

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From: The Ox5/11/2020 4:31:55 PM
2 Recommendations   of 5824
 
financialsense.com

TUE, MAY 5, 2020 - 3:28PM





By FS Staff
Financial Sense

David Rosenberg recently joined FS Insider to discuss first quarter GDP numbers and what they’re telling us about the state of the U.S. economy. He also explained why he sees the U.S. entering a depression, not a recession, and shares what could slow economic recovery down. Read below for excerpts from his interview with FS Insider.

If you’re not already a subscriber, click here.

For audio, see Global Economy in the Eye of the Storm, Says David Rosenberg.

What are your thoughts on this first quarter GDP number? And what does that tell you about where the U.S. economy is today?Well, some people might view it as just being old news, but we know that the eye of the storm is really happening this quarter. The eye of the storm was in April more than it was in March. In looking at the whole first quarter, the consensus was looking at -4% at an annual rate and it came in at minus 4.8%. To put that in perspective, that is the worst we've seen since the 2008-2009 Great Recession. It’s actually worse than any quarter we saw in the 1990-1991 recession, or in the 2001 recession.

This was rather historic in its own right. The only component that really rose was this panic buying of food. Food volume purchases from the grocery stores exploded to the upside by 25%. If you stripped the groceries out of this number, the GDP decline was 6.3%. We know that we're going to get something close to -40% for the second quarter. I think when you look at the incoming high frequency data, that's a given.

We're getting some good news on the medical front and we’re getting a gradual reopening of economies globally and across the U.S. Even in the best-case scenario though, it's going to take two to three years before this deflationary output gap is going to close. That's not what people are looking at right now.

Stay ahead of the news! Subscribe to our premium weekday podcast

Everybody's focused on the stimulus. Everybody's focused on when we're going to get a vaccine or get some treatment. Everybody's focused on the excitement around the reopening. But economists should really be focused on what's happening in the future to aggregate demand and aggregate supply because as long as we have a deflationary output gap, it's going to put ongoing downward pressure on profits and on profit margins, and it's going to create instability in the credit markets and lead to more defaults.

So, the only way we don't get a relapse out of this is with the Fed and the federal government continuing to plow that system with more and more cash and liquidity, and that's going to have its own repercussions down the road. But the first quarter data, coming back to your initial question of why it was so important, is because it showed that we are compounding the massive hole in the second quarter on top of much decline in the first quarter. This makes it that much harder to close the output gap get back to full employment. That's going to now take years even with a V-shaped recovery.

Can you discuss why we might be a in depression and what could slow down recovery?The reason why I've been saying that this is going to be a form of depression is because the recession is traditionally a business cycle haircut to GDP. We go down for two or three or four quarters. We had a six-quarter recession from 1973 to 1975, five or 10 years later people weren’t still talking about it. The thing about recessions is that you forget about them a year after they happen. A recession doesn't alter, in a secular fashion, people's behavior. It is a haircut to GDP, and we get through it.

A depression is something different. A depression is a shock that creates scars that linger for years. And a depression is different than a recession because while a depression is a recession, a depression invokes a secular change in people's behavior. So how they approach savings, how they approach spending, how they approach indebtedness, how they approach, in this case, where we're going to work, how we're going to travel. I think that in both the context of the personal sector and the business sector, it's going to be a big shift on how we create savings in cash and liquidity. It's phenomenal to me that liquidity became almost a dirty nine letter word going into this—nobody had any.

Portfolio managers went into this situation with a 2% cash cushion. That was unheard of. But the hubris and the complacency were at an incredibly high level. Companies didn't want to keep cash in the balance sheet, they bought back their stock instead. I find it absolutely incredible that after an 11-year jobs boom, we're in a situation where half of the American people did not even have enough savings to cover their expenses for three months.

That's what I'm trying to wrap my head around, is that we had this health shock that morphed into an economic shock. But then the other part of it was the government's decision to lock things down. Who thought it was going to morph into a financial crisis that was worse than 2008-2009? Now it doesn't involve the banks. But the culprit this time wasn't the banks. Who thought that as we went through this shock on the health side, on the economic side, the Fed was going to have to buy up virtually every corner of the fixed income market, who thought about that?

Who thought, at this stage, that the Fed's balance sheet would be 30% of GDP? Nobody was talking about that, even in late February into March, the extent to which we have such an unstable financial system that we need this much Fed and federal government assistance. So, my commentary is this: We went into this situation not prepared in many different respects. Obviously, from a health standpoint and from a medical infrastructure standpoint we were clearly unprepared.

But also, we didn't have enough cash on hand. And I think that the preservation of cash is going to be something very fundamental that will help mitigate the next crisis we have but it’s going to hold back this recovery. I do think that that's what differentiates a recession from a depression, is that the attitudes toward spending, saving, debt accumulation and how we’re going to be preserving more cash on the balance sheets, whether you’re household or business, is going through a profound change in the years ahead.

Click here to listen to our interview with David Rosenberg to get his macro-outlook and investment implications when it comes to bonds, stocks, gold and elsewhere. For a free one-month trial to David's research, go to www.rosenbergresearch.com/clients/register.

If you're not already a subscriber to our FS Insider podcast where we interview book authors, strategists and industry experts from across the globe on all things economics, finance and markets...

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To: The Ox who wrote (5780)5/11/2020 4:40:07 PM
From: The Ox
   of 5824
 
financialsense.com

<snip>

We're back on track now and the prediction from my cycles was next year and the year after were going to be very, very tough economic years. If I had to put a date on the beginnings of a proper new bull market, it's 2023. Then I think the next generation, the millennials, will be in the driving seat. There're a lot of new technologies that they will want, and they'll have quite an exciting thing and they’re quite likely coming up from much lower levels than we are now. And all sorts of things that we old baby boomers got used to, this new generation has a whole new set of things that they can do. If you think about built-in 5G and things like that, one can easily tell a bullish scenario.

But we've got to get rid of all this debt. We've got to get houses and certain assets back down to levels where a normal person can afford a property to live in. So all of that's got to return to something when nice young people with proper jobs can afford an economic activity that doesn't look as though that will happen until 2023. So, we've got a tough period to get through.

In trying to hang it together with this disease, I think the yield curve of the death rate will flatten out. But as soon as governments say start going back to work, the death rate will pick back up again. So, there can be subsequent humps.

We will be getting news from pharmaceutical companies encouraged by government money to bring on potential vaccines, and some of them will be helpful, but they wouldn't have passed all the tests so that they're available at least till the end of this year. And that's super early, it should normally take longer than that. Meanwhile, elsewhere in the world, this whole disaster is going to rumble on round. So I think it is very serious indeed and we're trying to survive.

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From: The Ox5/13/2020 8:23:26 AM
1 Recommendation   of 5824
 
marketwatch.com

Mark Hulbert
Opinion: Despite the stock market’s breathtaking rally, investors are closer to despair

<snip>
To be sure, not all sentiment indicators are suggesting that the prevailing mood is so gloomy. One notable exception is the Citi Panic/Euphoria Model, which is at the upper edge of its neutral zone, just shy of euphoria. According to Citigroup, any reading in that euphoric zone “generates a better-than-80% probability of prices being lower one year later.”

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From: The Ox5/13/2020 9:00:41 AM
1 Recommendation   of 5824
 
advisorperspectives.com

March update - April should be out soon


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To: The Ox who wrote (5783)5/13/2020 9:02:28 AM
From: The Ox
1 Recommendation   of 5824
 
advisorperspectives.com

(2 Charts below)



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To: The Ox who wrote (5784)5/13/2020 9:07:27 AM
From: The Ox
1 Recommendation   of 5824
 

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To: The Ox who wrote (5735)5/14/2020 11:48:52 AM
From: The Ox
   of 5824
 
spacenews.com



Intelsat declares bankruptcy as means to fund C-band spectrum clearing
by Caleb Henry — May 14, 2020
Intelsat's Tysons Corner, Virginia U.S. headquarters. Credit: Intelsat

WASHINGTON — Intelsat, the world’s second largest satellite operator by revenue, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection late May 13 as a means to ease its nearly $15 billion debt load and participate in an FCC spectrum clearing program.

Intelsat said it has secured a $1 billion debtor-in-possession financing commitment that, following court approval, will allow the company to fund continuing operations and get started clearing C-band spectrum under a program that could net the operator $4.86 billion.

The Luxembourg and Virginia-based operator filed for Chapter 11 in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Richmond. The company operates a fleet of roughly 50 satellites, and has another, Galaxy-30, scheduled to launch this summer on an Ariane 5 rocket.

Intelsat was thought to be headed toward bankruptcy after it skipped a $125 million interest payment in April, triggering a 30-day grace period before defaulting. The company’s second largest shareholder, Cyrus Capital Partners, told Intelsat it should avoid bankruptcy and anything that would jeopardize its chance at claiming the $4.86 billion in accelerated spectrum-clearing payments. That advice was opposite Intelsat’s third largest shareholder, Appaloosa, which urged Intelsat to use bankruptcy as a means of getting the FCC to pay the operator a higher amount.

Stephen Spengler, Intelsat’s chief executive, used the May 13 bankruptcy announcement to confirm Intelsat will participate in the FCC’s accelerated clearing program.

“We intend to move forward with the accelerated clearing of C-band spectrum in the United States and to achieve a comprehensive solution that would result in a stronger balance sheet,” Spengler said. “This will position us to invest and pursue our strategic growth objectives, build on our strengths, and serve the mission-critical needs of our customers with additional resources and wind in our sails.”

To receive the $4.86 billion, Intelsat has to compress customers from 500 megahertz of C-band into 200 megahertz by December 2023, two years faster than the FCC’s deadline to clear out the spectrum. The FCC is transferring the remaining 300 megahertz of spectrum, used today mainly for satellite broadcasting, to cellular operators for 5G networks.

David Tolley, Intelsat’s chief financial officer, said the company will need to spend around $1.6 billion on the manufacture and launch of new satellites, plus video compression technology and signal filters on the ground to clear C-band for 5G wireless signals. Half that amount, $800 million, will need to be spent by June 2021, before receiving any FCC reimbursement, he said.

Those upfront costs have “created an even greater need for the Company to obtain financing to meet the FCC’s quickly approaching Accelerated Relocation Payment deadlines,” Tolley wrote in Intelsat’s bankruptcy filing.

Tolley said the coronavirus pandemic is projected to reduce Intelsat’s 2020 revenue by $160 million because airplanes and cruise ships aren’t using as much satellite Wi-Fi, and the absence of live sporting events gutted demand for occasional use television broadcasting.

Intelsat General Corp., the military and government business arm of Intelsat, is not part of the Chapter 11 proceedings, Intelsat said.

Intelsat is the third large satellite communications company to declare bankruptcy this year, following network operator Speedcast in April, and megaconstellation startup OneWeb in March.

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