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   Gold/Mining/EnergyAlaska Natural Gas Pipeline


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To: Snowshoe who wrote (554)3/30/2012 6:21:11 AM
From: Snowshoe
   of 570
 
Japan's nuke fiasco re-arranged the playing field...

Alaska champions $40bn pipeline plan
www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/448b66c6-7343-11e1-aab3-00144feab49a.html

A (Point Thomson) settlement would clear the way for the companies to hasten their commercial assessment of a large gas pipeline to Alaska’s southern coast, from where LNG could be shipped to China and other Asian countries.

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From: Snowshoe3/30/2012 3:31:48 PM
   of 570
 
Deal announced on Point Thomson leases, gas line partnership
adn.com

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To: Snowshoe who wrote (556)3/30/2012 3:34:54 PM
From: Snowshoe
   of 570
 
Exxon, BP, Conoco Agree To Initial Pt. Thomson Production By Early 2016 -Settlement
nasdaq.com

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From: Snowshoe3/30/2012 5:25:18 PM
   of 570
 
Exxon's March 30 letter to Governor Parnell regarding Point Thomson and Alaska North Slope gas...
media.adn.com

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From: Snowshoe6/22/2013 6:36:25 PM
   of 570
 
Alaska LNG project companies miss Parnell's deadline
alaskadispatch.com

The project may face plenty of competition. Liquefied gas projects are under construction around the world, including several in Australia as well as one in Louisiana and Papua New Guinea. Meanwhile, more than 30 additional LNG projects are being considered around the world, with more than a dozen proposed in the Lower 48, piquing fears that the Alaska project will be deemed uneconomic by the time the studies are done.

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From: Snowshoe8/15/2013 12:09:58 PM
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Alaska LNG could prove just the right fit for Asian markets
alaskadispatch.com

Bill White
August 14, 2013

Alaska North Slope gas exported to Asia could hold a key attraction over other U.S. LNG exports: The Alaska gas would burn hotter.

To adopt the gas industry's jargon, Alaska's liquefied natural gas would be somewhat "wet" or "rich" compared with the "dry" or "lean" gas other U.S. liquefaction plants will process into LNG.

And many Asian buyers love wet gas -- which is laced with gas liquids that raise the heat content. Especially in key markets such as Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, power-plant turbines, industrial furnaces and household appliances are calibrated to burn rich gas.

A gas-fueled kitchen stove built for a Japanese home could not be used in the United States without modification, and vice versa.

*****

As the gas industry expanded by pipeline and by LNG tanker, different regional systems developed in isolation from one another, sort of how different languages emerged around the world. Each new gas system was a unit unto itself, based on the quality of local or regional gas supplies. In industrialized North America, dry gas was amply available, so that's what is piped to U.S. furnaces. Japan, South Korea and Taiwan built their systems on the wet-gas LNG blends from nearby Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei.

*****

For starters, let's put some numbers on the table to help explain wet gas vs. dry gas:

• 1.01 million British thermal units, or Btu -- This is the heat content of 1,000 cubic feet of methane, a standard measure of methane. Energy content is reported in Btus so that different fuels -- gas, oil, coal -- can be compared. Natural gas usually is priced in units of 1 million Btu.
• 1.022 million Btu -- The average heat content per thousand cubic feet of U.S. pipeline gas, the gas that goes to power plants and home furnaces. This pipeline gas is almost pure methane.
• 1.06 to 1.13 million Btu -- The heat content that Japanese and South Korean utilities expect from the gas they burn. (Some sources will show different ranges based on different assumptions about the temperature and pressure of the gas. The range given here serves to show that Japan and Korea use a higher-Btu gas than found in pure methane or U.S. pipeline gas.)

Liquefied North Slope Alaska gas should fall within the Btu window of Japan and Korea, with likely a minimum of about 1.07 million Btu of energy per thousand cubic feet. Certain decisions by the gas producers, their customers and others could push this Btu number higher.

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From: Snowshoe9/18/2013 2:09:16 AM
   of 570
 
Alaska signs agreement that could provide financing options for mega natural gas project
alaskadispatch.com

Alex DeMarban
September 11, 2013

In the wake of criticism about Gov. Sean Parnell's willingness to work with a Japanese group interested in buying Alaska's natural gas, state officials announced on Wednesday that the state has signed a memorandum of understanding with a Japanese bank known as a leading financier of liquefied natural gas projects.

The agreement with the Japanese Bank for International Cooperation was signed in Tokyo yesterday, when it was Tuesday in Alaska, by Natural Resources Commissioner Dan Sullivan and the bank's managing director, Koichi Yajima.

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From: Snowshoe9/20/2013 4:14:03 PM
   of 570
 
Why keep TransCanada on the Alaska gasline project, if the focus is shifting toward LNG export via an in-state pipeline?

Former Gov. Murkowski talks gasline

Updated: September 20, 2013 - 12:11am

By JENNIFER CANFIELD
JUNEAU EMPIRE

The State of Alaska should concentrate its efforts on a liquefied natural gas line through Southcentral and it shouldn’t involve TransCanada, former Alaska Governor Frank Murkowski said during a Juneau Chamber of Commerce luncheon Thursday.

TransCanada is working with ExxonMobil, BP and ConocoPhillips on the large capacity gas line project created under the Alaska Gasline Inducement Act. TransCanada and ExxonMobil were the original partners under AGIA, which included $500 million in state funding to advance the pipeline originally planned to reach Alberta.

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To: Sam who wrote (496)7/3/2014 5:05:05 AM
From: Snowshoe
   of 570
 
Palin's AGIA finally croaks...

Life after AGIA: The Alaska Gasline Inducement Act is buried, but the pipeline dream lives on
newsminer.com

Posted: Sunday, January 12, 2014 4:35 pm

Gov. Sean Parnell, who was Gov. Palin’s lieutenant governor at the time, announced on Friday that the state and pipeline-builder TransCanada have agreed to terminate their working relationship under AGIA but remain engaged in pursuit of a pipeline. TransCanada was the winning company chosen under the AGIA process, which was approved overwhelmingly by the Legislature — 37-1 in the House and 20-0 in the Senate.

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From: Snowshoe7/3/2014 5:10:27 AM
   of 570
 
The next pipe dream: export our gas to Asia...

Engineering studies to begin on Alaska LNG project
alaskadispatch.com

July 2, 2014

ConocoPhillips, BP, Exxon Mobil Corp. and other parties have signed an agreement to advance the state’s long-sought multibillion-dollar liquefied natural gas project.

The signing of the agreement will allow the parties to move toward a permitting phase and to conduct work that will be needed to apply for a license to export the North Slope’s massive natural gas reserves.

But the project remains a long way from reality. The new agreement will precede a second phase of work, expected to start in 2016, that will require another agreement and approval from the Legislature.

Production won’t begin until 2025 or 2026, said Dan Fauske, president of the Alaska Gasline Development Corp.

Still, the signing was important enough that Gov. Sean Parnell called it a “milestone” in a press release [2] sent Wednesday afternoon. The project is considered pivotal in an oil-dependent state that has seen crude production fall over the last quarter century.

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