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   PastimesThe United States Marine Corps


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From: TimF12/12/2020 8:13:34 PM
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Marines board a landing craft air cushion inside the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan

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From: TimF2/9/2021 2:21:40 PM
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What We Did Was Real - WW2 Marine Recalls Island Combat | Memoirs Of WWII #13

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From: TimF2/19/2021 5:11:51 PM
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Marine Corps Reveals It Has Tested A New Anti-Ship Missile Launcher Truck
thedrive.com

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To: TimF who wrote (6210)2/19/2021 5:14:36 PM
From: LindyBill
   of 6223
 
Anti-Ship Missile Launcher Truck

It's going to sit on what shore and launch at what ships? Sounds redundant to me.

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To: LindyBill who wrote (6211)2/19/2021 5:40:11 PM
From: TimF
   of 6223
 
I'm not sure I understand what your getting at with the question. Like any weapon's system it sits were you put it and it launches at your target.

Its not a new concept, other countries have mobile ground based anti-ship missile launchers, but I think it is new to the USMC.

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To: TimF who wrote (6212)2/19/2021 7:33:25 PM
From: LindyBill
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I just can't imagine a situation where the Marines would be firing from shore to hit enemy ships.

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To: LindyBill who wrote (6213)2/19/2021 8:10:36 PM
From: TimF
   of 6223
 
Such a situation would be unlikely. It would presumably require a peer or near-peer conflict (which would be unlikely mostly but not only because they would probably have nuclear weapons). Any conflict against a lesser power (or in particular against some militia, insurrection, or terrorist group) would either be against someone without ships or with ships that would probably never threaten the USMC mission because they would be destroyed before coming close.

Potentially if you had some small USMC deployment near the coast or on an island off the coast of South Korea it could be used against North Korea's navy, but North Korea's navy (at least if they try to use it actively rather than hide it) would not likely be long for this world in any 2nd Korean War. You could also get scenarios against the Iranian navy but the same point holds for them as well.

Even among neer-peer powers Russia is not likely to present the type of threat that this would deal with, their conventional threat would mostly be deployed across land. There are some possible scenarios for small scale use against Russia in maybe the Baltics or potentially Norway, but the Russian surface fleet would probably stay on defense in any potential war.

So at the moment its pretty targeted to China. If the US tried to stop some Chinese attack against Taiwan, or the Japanese islands that the PRC claims, or you had some other island based conflict in the East China Sea, or South China Sea, or potentially further from China than that (but still in the Pacific) if the naval balance between the US and China shifts significantly, and China becomes more aggressive further away from their shores.

I don't think the capability would be worth developing if it was extremely expensive but this isn't an extremely expensive capability for military equipment. The launchers are just variants of vehicles that the USMC is going to have anyway, and the missiles are already developed.

I think having the capability makes sense for the US. It makes even more sense for other countries that are close to potential threats like Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Finland, Sweden, Vietnam, Israel, Iran (who would want to use it against the US or against countries that we are allied to). And a number of them already have mobile ground based anti-ship missiles launchers.

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To: TimF who wrote (6214)2/19/2021 8:57:13 PM
From: LindyBill
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The Marines have not impressed me with their weapon's choices. Their vertical lift planes sat on the decke of the carriers in the Indian Ocean during Afghan one because they didn't have the range to loiter. They still went ahead with them on the F-35.

They would do better spending their research on how to better protect and help their troops to fight.

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From: TimF6/23/2021 8:19:18 PM
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Marines Pick Loitering Munition To Arm Light Vehicles And Drone Boats
So-called "suicide drones" will give Marine units a new option for finding threats and engaging them precisely on land and at sea.
thedrive.com

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From: TimF9/1/2021 8:04:34 PM
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U.S. Marine F-35Bs to Operate off Largest Japanese Warship Later This Year
By: Sam LaGrone
September 1, 2021

U.S. Marine F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters will operate off a Japanese warship later this year, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. David Berger said on Wednesday.

In November, the Marine F-35Bs will embark on one of the two 24,000-ton Izumo-class helicopter destroyers in an exchange that could lead to a similar program in which a U.S. Marine JSF squadron embarked aboard U.K. Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) this year.

“We’re not going to go on deployment but we’re actually going to fly U.S. Marine Corps F-35s off of a Japanese ship,” Berger said on Wednesday during a U.S. Naval Institute – CSIS Maritime Security Dialogue.

The Japanese government approached the Marines in 2019 to consider the exchange of aircraft in parallel to the retrofit that would allow Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force warships JS Izumo (DDH-183) and JS Kaga (DDH-184) to embark F-35Bs, USNI News reported at the time.

The warship will likely be JS Izumo (DDH-183). Izumo completed the first phase of the modifications to accommodate F-35s in July, according to Naval News. The modifications include adding lines to the deck and heat-resistant coatings.

“In this second modification, the bow shape of the Izumo will be changed from the current trapezoidal shape to a rectangular shape to make it easier to operate the F-35B, and other changes to the ship’s interior compartments are also planned,” reported Naval News.

The modification of Izumo and Kaga are paired with a planned JSDF buy of 42 F-35Bs to operate from the two ships. The first of the JSDF F-35Bs are set to arrive in Fiscal Year 2023.

The expansion of Japan’s F-35 capability comes as the Chinese have expanded their own naval capability to improve the People’s Liberation Army Navy’s amphibious capability...

news.usni.org

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