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   Gold/Mining/EnergyOMEX - Odyssey Marine Exploration Inc


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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (34)4/4/2008 10:15:19 AM
From: MJ
   of 61
 
Morning Glenn

Thanks for staying on top of the news on Odessey. I will get a copy of the New Yorker, used to subscribe for the cartoons and poetry.

Did you know that John Edwards has investments in the company either directly or indirectly---that would be a natural investment for him to consider as his proximity to the coast.

merchantroyalshipwreck.com

I only have 100 shares bought it to stay abreast of the story.

Have a good day--------mj

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From: scooper4/7/2008 2:31:08 AM
   of 61
 
I read the article. The upshot is that OMEX principals exaggerated claims in the past but this time they have the HMS Merced, for which there is plenty of documentation and which had a million dollars worth of gold and silver in 1622 - perhaps $1 billion worth now (not $4 billion, because it's in piastres, not British pounds, and they are worth 25 percent of the pounds, which earlier reports valued at $4 billion). This is the now-fabled "Black Swan," and I think there's a good case that because it was on a commercial voyage Spain will have no claim to it, and of course the British have signed an agreement with OMEX on it. While it shows how dicey the early days were and how expensive the whole proposition is, it also shows that they have the treasure of the century.

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To: MJ who wrote (35)2/1/2009 3:03:29 PM
From: Glenn Petersen
2 Recommendations   of 61
 
Wreck of renowned British warship found in Channel

Feb 1, 11:10 AM EST

By MITCH STACY
Associated Press Writer



In this photo released Sunday, Feb. 1, 2009 by Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc., the Odyssey Explorer's ROV takes a photo of a Bronze cannon on the shipwreck site of HMS Victory bearing the royal crest of King George I, in the English Channel. Florida deep-sea explorers who found $500 million in sunken treasure two years ago say they have discovered another prized shipwreck: the legendary British man-of-war that sank in the English Channel 264 years ago. Odyssey Marine Exploration hasn't found any gold this time, but it's looking for an even bigger jackpot. The company's research indicates the HMS Victory was carrying 4 tons of gold coins. (AP Photo/Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc.)
__________

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) -- Florida deep-sea explorers who found $500 million in sunken treasure two years ago say they have discovered another prized shipwreck: A legendary British man-of-war that sank in the English Channel 264 years ago.

Odyssey Marine Exploration hasn't found any gold this time, but it's looking for an even bigger jackpot. The company's research indicates the HMS Victory was carrying 4 tons of gold coins that could be worth considerably more than the treasure that Odyssey raised from a sunken Spanish galleon in 2007, co-founder Greg Stemm said ahead of a news conference set for Monday in London.

So far, Odyssey has recovered two brass cannons from the wreck of the Victory and continues to examine and map the debris field, which lies about 330 feet beneath the surface, Stemm said. The company said it is negotiating with the British government over collaborating on the project.

"This is a big one, just because of the history," Stemm said. "Very rarely do you solve an age-old mystery like this."

Odyssey said the 31 brass cannons and other evidence on the wreck allowed definitive identification of the HMS Victory, 175-foot sailing ship that was separated from its fleet during a storm and sank in the English Channel on Oct. 4, 1744, with at least 900 men aboard. The ship was the largest and, with 110 brass cannons, the most heavily armed vessel of its day. It was the inspiration for the HMS Victory famously commanded by Adm. Horatio Nelson decades later.

Odyssey was searching for other valuable shipwrecks in the English Channel when it came across the Victory. Stemm wouldn't say exactly where the ship was found for fear of attracting plunderers, though he said it wasn't close to where it was expected to be.

"We found this more than 50 miles from where anybody would have thought it went down," Stemm said. Federal court records filed by Odyssey in Tampa seeking the exclusive salvage rights said the site is 25 to 40 miles from the English coast, outside of its territorial waters.

A Ministry of Defense spokesman said Sunday the government was aware of Odyssey's claim to have found the Victory.

"Assuming the wreck is indeed that of a British warship, her remains are sovereign immune," he said on condition of anonymity in keeping with government policy. "This means that no intrusive action may be taken without the express consent of the United Kingdom."

He would not say whether the government had begun talks with Odyssey over the future of the find.

Newspapers of the day and other historical records analyzed by the company indicated that the Victory sank off the Channel Island of Alderney near Cherbourg, France. A 1991 British postage stamp depicts the Victory crashing on the rocks there. Pieces of the ship had washed up in various places, but its final resting place had remained a mystery.

The belief that the Victory had crashed onto the rocks had marred an otherwise exemplary service record of the ship's commander, Sir John Balchin, and a lighthouse keeper on Alderney was prosecuted for failing to keep the light on. Odyssey believes the discovery exonerates both men.

"As far as the family is concerned, it is an astonishing revelation," said Robert Balchin, a 66-year-old British university administrator and direct descendant of the commander. "It's as if he's sort of come alive again.

"When I went to see this extraordinary find of the cannon with the coat of arms of the king on the side, it was really a wonderful feeling to know that Sir John Balchin saw that every day, and it brought a very special communion with the past."

The HMS Victory was returning from Lisbon, Portugal, and was probably transporting 100,000 gold Portuguese coins for merchants, according to Odyssey's research. The ship had sailed there to help rescue a Mediterranean convoy blockaded by the French in the River Tagus at Lisbon.

The wreck site is roughly 70 feet by 200 feet and littered with other debris, Odyssey said. Its research ship, Odyssey Explorer, is equipped with a remote underwater robot capable of carefully removing the smallest of items from the bottom and shooting high-resolution photos and video.

Odyssey, a publicly traded corporation, announced in May 2007 that it had raised 17 tons of silver coins from an Atlantic Ocean shipwreck. The company later said it believed the wreck to be the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes y las Animas, which sank off Portugal in 1804.

Shortly afterward, the Spanish government sued Odyssey in federal court in Tampa to claim the treasure, arguing that the shipwreck was never abandoned by Spain. The case is pending.

Some in the Spanish government have called the company 21st-century pirates, and twice in the months after the 2007 announcement, ships from Spain's Civil Guard seized Odyssey ships off the Spanish coast. Both ships and their crews were released within a week.

The company's relationship with the British government has been more cordial. Odyssey had already negotiated an agreement with British officials regarding the search for the HMS Sussex, which sank in the western Mediterranean in 1694 with gold coins aboard.

---

Associated Press writer Jill Lawless in London contributed to this report.

© 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy.

hosted.ap.org

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To: MJ who wrote (35)1/16/2011 4:59:05 AM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 61
 
WikiLeaks Cables Make Appearance in a Tale of Sunken Treasure and Nazi Theft

By KIM SEVERSON and ROBBIE BROWN
New York Times
January 6, 2011

ATLANTA — The latest twist in the WikiLeaks tale is a plot worthy of a Tom Clancy thriller.

It is a story of international intrigue starring millions of dollars in sunken treasure, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, the government of Spain and an Impressionist painting by Camille Pissarro of a rain-soaked Paris boulevard, believed to have been stolen by the Nazis.

Odyssey Marine Exploration, a Tampa, Fla., deep-sea treasure hunting company, is using classified cables from the State Department in its legal battle with Spain over who owns $500 million of gold and silver retrieved in 2007 from the wreckage of a Spanish galleon off the coast of Portugal.

The cables, part of more than 250,000 confidential documents obtained by WikiLeaks, include communications between the Spanish cultural minister and the American ambassador to Spain. First published in The Guardian of London and El País of Madrid, they are shrouded in the careful language of international diplomacy.

But Odyssey says they show that the ambassador offered to assist Spain in the fight over the sunken treasure. In return, Odyssey says, Spain was to help get a Madrid museum to return the 1897 Pissarro painting, valued at as much as $20 million, to a California family that says it was illegally taken by Nazis in Germany.

Odyssey has been fighting with Spain over the treasure in the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, in Atlanta. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. and the Justice Department have weighed in supporting Spain’s claim.

But Odyssey says the federal government has had a secret motive for getting involved in the case.
On Wednesday, lawyers for the company filed a motion asking that, based on the cables, the court strike the Justice Department filing and require the government to note its interests in the case.

“Based on the evidence available to us so far, we are quite concerned,” said Greg Stemm, Odyssey’s chief executive. “The WikiLeaks cables are opening a window into the inner workings of international diplomacy for the general public, and it isn’t always pretty.”

A State Department spokesman declined to comment Thursday on the legal issue. But William Barron, a lawyer in New York who is representing Spain in the painting case, denied that there was a secret agreement between the Spanish and American governments.

“These are two totally separate issues,” he said. “Somebody is spinning this into a quid pro quo agreement, but the documents do not show that.”

The case has divided local and federal politicians, with a delegation of four congressmen from Florida urging Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Holder to support the treasure hunters.

“I am disturbed by the actions of the State and Justice Departments,” said Representative Gus Bilirakis, a Florida Republican. “These actions suggest that the U.S. government is ceding its sovereignty to foreign governments.”

Technology experts say the case is the first of many that are likely to draw on the trove of secret information available in the cables. The WikiLeaks documents have primarily been studied by journalists and government experts, but also have application to businesses and private citizens.

Lisa Lynch, a professor of journalism at Concordia University in Montreal and an expert on the WikiLeak phenomena, said the cables contain a wealth of facts about governments, commerce and people involved in dealings with both.

“We’ve really only seen the first wave of fallout from the information,” she said.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: January 8, 2011

An article on Friday about a legal dispute between American sunken treasure hunters and the government of Spain, in which the treasure hunters are using some of the confidential diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks, referred incorrectly to the release of those cables. WikiLeaks has 251,287 cables and has released all of them to several news organizations; it has not released all of them publicly. (According to the State Department, about 2,700 of the cables have been made public to date.) The error also appeared on Dec. 4 in an article about the cables and in an Inside The Times capsule summary for that article.)


nytimes.com

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (38)1/16/2011 2:13:35 PM
From: MJ
   of 61
 
Real intrigue from John Edwards as noted in my message number 38------while he was running for office to gain the Democrat Presidency----to Hillary Clinton and Eric Holder.

"Did you know that John Edwards has investments in the company either directly or indirectly---that would be a natural investment for him to consider as his proximity to the coast."

merchantroyalshipwreck.com

And Wikileaks is presenting the story------------while we investors were not in the know.

My question, who is after the gold? Is it our Federal Government? Is it Spain"

A Tom Clancey novel for sure.

____________________________________________________________

WikiLeaks Cables Make Appearance in a Tale of Sunken Treasure and Nazi Theft

By KIM SEVERSON and ROBBIE BROWN
New York Times
January 6, 2011

ATLANTA — The latest twist in the WikiLeaks tale is a plot worthy of a Tom Clancy thriller.

It is a story of international intrigue starring millions of dollars in sunken treasure, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, the government of Spain and an Impressionist painting by Camille Pissarro of a rain-soaked Paris boulevard, believed to have been stolen by the Nazis.

Odyssey Marine Exploration, a Tampa, Fla., deep-sea treasure hunting company, is using classified cables from the State Department in its legal battle with Spain over who owns $500 million of gold and silver retrieved in 2007 from the wreckage of a Spanish galleon off the coast of Portugal.

The cables, part of more than 250,000 confidential documents obtained by WikiLeaks, include communications between the Spanish cultural minister and the American ambassador to Spain. First published in The Guardian of London and El País of Madrid, they are shrouded in the careful language of international diplomacy.

But Odyssey says they show that the ambassador offered to assist Spain in the fight over the sunken treasure. In return, Odyssey says, Spain was to help get a Madrid museum to return the 1897 Pissarro painting, valued at as much as $20 million, to a California family that says it was illegally taken by Nazis in Germany.

Odyssey has been fighting with Spain over the treasure in the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, in Atlanta. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. and the Justice Department have weighed in supporting Spain’s claim.

But Odyssey says the federal government has had a secret motive for getting involved in the case. On Wednesday, lawyers for the company filed a motion asking that, based on the cables, the court strike the Justice Department filing and require the government to note its interests in the case.

“Based on the evidence available to us so far, we are quite concerned,” said Greg Stemm, Odyssey’s chief executive. “The WikiLeaks cables are opening a window into the inner workings of international diplomacy for the general public, and it isn’t always pretty.”

A State Department spokesman declined to comment Thursday on the legal issue. But William Barron, a lawyer in New York who is representing Spain in the painting case, denied that there was a secret agreement between the Spanish and American governments.

“These are two totally separate issues,” he said. “Somebody is spinning this into a quid pro quo agreement, but the documents do not show that.”

The case has divided local and federal politicians, with a delegation of four congressmen from Florida urging Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Holder to support the treasure hunters.

“I am disturbed by the actions of the State and Justice Departments,” said Representative Gus Bilirakis, a Florida Republican. “These actions suggest that the U.S. government is ceding its sovereignty to foreign governments.”

Technology experts say the case is the first of many that are likely to draw on the trove of secret information available in the cables. The WikiLeaks documents have primarily been studied by journalists and government experts, but also have application to businesses and private citizens.

Lisa Lynch, a professor of journalism at Concordia University in Montreal and an expert on the WikiLeak phenomena, said the cables contain a wealth of facts about governments, commerce and people involved in dealings with both.

“We’ve really only seen the first wave of fallout from the information,” she said.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: January 8, 2011

An article on Friday about a legal dispute between American sunken treasure hunters and the government of Spain, in which the treasure hunters are using some of the confidential diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks, referred incorrectly to the release of those cables. WikiLeaks has 251,287 cables and has released all of them to several news organizations; it has not released all of them publicly. (According to the State Department, about 2,700 of the cables have been made public to date.) The error also appeared on Dec. 4 in an article about the cables and in an Inside The Times capsule summary for that article.)

nytimes.com

mj

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To: MJ who wrote (39)9/25/2011 10:57:13 PM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 61
 
Divers Set Sights on Silver-Laden WWII Ship


Odyssey Marine Exploration
A deepwater robot took this photo of the S.S. Gairsoppa, which sank in 1941 off the Irish coast.
_______________

By WILLIAM J. BROAD
New York Times
Published: September 25, 2011

In 1941, a Nazi torpedo tore a hole in a British merchant ship carrying a fortune in silver to England from India. The ship was part of a convoy headed for Liverpool, but it went down about 300 miles southwest of Ireland, disappearing in icy waters nearly three miles deep, deeper than the resting place of the Titanic.

Now, divers say they have found the wreck intact and they estimate its cargo at up to 240 tons of silver — a trove worth more than $200 million. They plan to recover it this spring.

The recovery, if successful, would be history’s deepest and largest retrieval of a precious cargo lost at sea and highlight the growing power of ocean technology, according to Odyssey Marine Exploration, the company that found the ship. It is working under contract to the British government and says it verified the ship’s identity this month.

“We were fortunate to find the shipwreck sitting upright, with the holds open and easily accessible,” said Greg Stemm, chief executive of Odyssey, which is based in Tampa, Fla. “This should enable to us to unload cargo through the hatches, as would happen with a ship alongside a cargo terminal.”

Mr. Stemm added that a growing number of seafaring nations view cargo recovery as a creative way to increase revenues. In such arrangements, private contractors put their own money at risk in costly expeditions and split any profits. Odyssey, for instance, is to get 80 percent of the silver’s value, and the British government 20 percent.

“It doesn’t cost taxpayers a dollar and accrues right to the bottom line,” Mr. Stemm said in an interview. “Governments are waking up to the potential.”

The ship carrying the valuable cargo was the S.S. Gairsoppa, a vessel of the British Indian Steam Navigation Company that was named for a spectacular waterfall near India’s western coast. In December 1940, it sailed from Calcutta laden with tea, iron and tons of silver. In Freetown, Sierra Leone, the ship joined a military convoy headed to the British Isles and the contested waters of the North Atlantic.

The merchant steamship, 412 feet long, had 83 crewmen and two gunners on board, according to Lloyd’s of London, which compiles information about cargo lost in war.

High winds and a heavy swell soon forced the Gairsoppa to slow. As the weather deteriorated, the captain judged that the wallowing ship had insufficient coal to make it to Liverpool and broke from the convoy for Galway, in western Ireland.

Then, a highly decorated German U-boat captain, Ernst Mengersen, moved in for the attack. It was Feb. 17, 1941. A single torpedo ripped through the Gairsoppa’s hull and exploded, causing the forward mast to topple and the antenna to snap, cutting off the ship from the world. The U-boat opened fire as the Gairsoppa sank.

All 85 men died save one — the second officer, who survived 13 days in a lifeboat.

In recent years, the famous lost cargo of silver began to beckon as technological strides resulted in new generations of sturdy robots, lights, cameras and claws that can withstand the crushing pressure of the deep. At least one company tried, and failed, to find the shipwreck.

In early 2010, Odyssey won an exclusive contract from Britain’s Department for Transport to salvage the cargo. This past summer, it hired a Russian ship and performed a preliminary survey in international waters, finding what it considered solid clues.

And this month, the company took its main ship, the Odyssey Explorer, to investigate the area. Its tethered robot took three and a half hours to descend 2.9 miles through dark waters to the muddy seabed. Then came a eureka moment, when the robot found a gaping hole where the torpedo struck 70 years ago.

The hulk of the Gairsoppa was covered in rivulets of rust known as rusticles, which look like brownish icicles. But still standing bright and shiny on the deck was a waist-high compass used by the helmsmen. There, small creatures with long tentacles had made themselves at home.

Odyssey says it confirmed the wreck’s identity from evidence including the number of holds, the anchor type, the scupper locations and red-and-black hull colors that matched the scheme used by the British Indian Steam Navigation Company.

During the four-and-a-half-hour examination, the robot did not locate any of the precious metal, but it did observe that all five holds had lost their covers. Inside one, the robot spied tea chests whose shiny tin linings for a moment were taken as evidence of silver bars.

Mr. Stemm, Odyssey’s chief executive, said the British government had approved a news release announcing the discovery, which Odyssey is to make public on Monday.

Nobody knows how much silver may lurk inside the Gairsoppa. The wartime government, to avoid giving enemies information about valuable targets, deliberately kept its transportation records opaque. But Odyssey’s historical research indicates that the ship probably held a fortune in silver equal to 240 tons, probably in bars and coins.

The company found that the British government paid out an insurance claim on about half that amount owned by private parties, and it sees the gap between the payout and the total reported value of the cargo as possibly alluding to the government’s hidden share.

The price of silver (along with gold) plunged on world markets last week, to about $31 an ounce. But even that relatively low price would mean a total cargo value of nearly $240 million.

Odyssey says it does not expect to find human remains, in part because no crewmen would have occupied the cargo holds. Still, it says the ship’s resting place nearly three miles down “deserves respect in recognition of the brave merchant mariners who sacrificed so much.”

Peter Cope, a former British submariner who researches shipwrecks for Odyssey and other companies, said in an interview that the world’s oceans were littered with valuable wrecks now coming into play.

“Technology is opening up a very big door,” he said. “Think of how many ships were sunk in the First and Second World Wars. There are millions of ounces of silver — and thousands of tons of tin and copper — down there.”

nytimes.com

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (40)9/26/2011 1:29:31 AM
From: MJ
   of 61
 
Your posting may explain the upward blip in the stock. I had not looked at it for some time until last week.

Also note the following------go to SI quote page for OMEX

Odyssey Marine Exploration to Hold Conference Call on September 26, 2011 Date : 09/22/2011 @ 11:25AM Source : GlobeNewswire Inc. Stock : Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc. (OMEX) Quote : 2.66 0.31 (13.19%) @ 8:00PM

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To: MJ who wrote (41)9/30/2011 8:56:52 PM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 61
 
Odyssey was unable to hold its gains this week. The company has not yet figured out a business model that will allow them to make money. Too many revenue hungry governments looking for a piece, though it is pretty exciting to follow their efforts.

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (42)10/1/2011 1:37:43 AM
From: MJ
   of 61
 
Hi Glenn

Yes following the OMEX story is fascinating , exciting, educational and fun to follow.

Until I started reading the OMEX exploration stories, I had no idea about the international
intrigue in salvaging the old ships.

Best

mjl

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To: MJ who wrote (43)10/10/2011 11:08:59 AM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 61
 
Another find for Odyssey:

Silver Treasure, Worth $18 Million, Found in North Atlantic


Odyssey Marine Exploration
Odyssey's ROV inspection of the SS Mantola site, approximately 2,500 meters deep, revealed the bridge deck accommodations with the promenade behind the railings and one of the cabins in the background.
____________________

By WILLIAM J. BROAD
New York Times
Published: October 10, 2011

Sea explorers announced Monday the discovery of a new sunken treasure that they plan to retrieve from the bottom of the North Atlantic.

Off Ireland in 1917, a German torpedo sank the British steam ship Mantola, sending the vessel and its cargo of an estimated 20 tons of silver to the seabed more than a mile down. At today’s prices, the metal would be worth about $18 million.

Odyssey Marine Exploration, based in Tampa, Fla., said it had visually confirmed the identity of the Mantola with a tethered robot last month during an expedition and had been contracted by the British Department for Transport (a successor to the Ministry of War Transport) to retrieve the lost riches.

In recent years, cash-strapped governments have started looking to lost cargoes as a way to raise money. They do so because the latest generation of robots, lights, cameras and claws can withstand the deep’s crushing pressures and have opened up a new world of shipwreck recovery.

“A lot of new and interesting opportunities are presenting themselves,” said Greg Stemm, the chief executive of Odyssey. The new finding, he added, is the company’s second discovery of a deep-ocean wreck for the British government this year.

In such arrangements, private companies put their own money at risk in costly expeditions and split any profits. In this case, Odyssey is to get 80 percent of the silver’s value and the British government 20 percent. It plans to attempt the recovery this spring, along with that of its previous find.

Last month, Odyssey announced its discovery of the British steam ship Gairsoppa off Ireland and estimated its cargo at up to 240 tons of silver — a trove worth more than $200 million. The Gairsoppa was torpedoed in 1941.

Both ships had been owned by the British Indian Steam Navigation Company and both were found by Odyssey during expeditions in the past few months. Odyssey said that the Mantola’s sinking in 1917 had prompted the British government to pay out an insurance claim on about 600,000 troy ounces of silver, or more than 20 tons.

Mr. Stemm said the Mantola’s silver should make “a great target for testing some new technology” of deep-sea retrieval.

The Mantola was less than a year old when, on Feb. 4, 1917, she steamed out of London on her last voyage, bound for Calcutta. According to Odyssey, the ship carried 18 passengers, 165 crew members and diverse cargo. The captain was David James Chivas, the great-nephew of the Chivas Brothers, known for their Chivas Regal brand of Scotch whiskey.

Four days out of port, a German submarine fired a torpedo and the ship sank with minimal loss of life.

In an expedition last month, Odyssey lowered a tethered robot that positively identified the wreck. The evidence included the ship’s dimensions, its layout and a display of painted letters on the stern that fit the words “Mantola” and “Glasgow,” the ship’s home port.

Photographs show the hulk covered in rivulets of rust known as rusticles, which look like brownish icicles. One picture shows a large sea creature poised near the ship’s railing.

nytimes.com

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