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To: isopatch who wrote (96173)12/4/2019 3:34:20 PM
From: Logain Ablar
   of 97949
 
IMO we need to see a little bit more of a recovery as these stocks have been hammered in the past few months. Yesterday's action was nice on a down day. Today better so maybe tax selling is over.

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To: Logain Ablar who wrote (96174)12/4/2019 3:45:27 PM
From: isopatch
1 Recommendation   of 97949
 
My thoughts as well. OTOH, how much year end and/or January Effect recovery we get depends as much on our economy not slowing as on the next few blasts of cold temps.

Have to leave it at that. Errands to run.

Cheers,

Iso

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To: isopatch who wrote (96171)12/4/2019 8:49:44 PM
From: diegosan
   of 97949
 
You have gas from a well going directly to your home? Does it get modified in some way? Concentration? Purity? My ignorance goes farther than I imagined.

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To: diegosan who wrote (96176)12/4/2019 9:23:21 PM
From: isopatch
4 Recommendations   of 97949
 
<My ignorance goes farther than I imagined>

It's not you. Few outside one of the major gas producing basins know about anything about such things. We didn't before buying this place in late 2008.

A direct line run from a nearby well, has to include the following equipment - on the line - to process & control the flow of gas before it enters you home.

1. A "Liquid Dryer" to remove water vapor, and natural gas liquids like propane & butane. If not removed, NG liquids will build up carbon deposits on the heat exchanger of the gas furnace. In a few years, efficiency of the furnace drops significantly. The exchanger has to be replaced at considerable cost. Not a plan...))

Liquid Dryer is basically a small cast iron tank. It's 1/2 filled with ordinary automotive anti-freeze. The anti-freeze removes unwanted liquid residues with only dry gas entering your home systems. Once installed, you simply drain the anti-freeze and unwanted liquids, once/year. Then replace the antifreeze.

2. A "Regulator" which automatically shuts off the flow if the line pressure drops too low for you gas furnace and other gas appliances to reliably function..

Theses 2 items aren't particularly expensive If memory serves, about $250 for the Liquid Dryer & $125 for the Regulator. That includes labor for an experienced local plumber. Direct well hookups like ours are fairly common in old gas basins like this one. Was told about 1/2 the homes in this valley have such well hookups.

Iso

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From: isopatch12/4/2019 10:03:59 PM
1 Recommendation   of 97949
 
Honest Big Picture Energy Perspectives.


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From: isopatch12/5/2019 12:29:48 AM
2 Recommendations   of 97949
 
All time record snow cover. Information provided from 3 different news sources:

<United States – Record-high snow cover across the Lower 48

December 4, 2019

by Robert

Snow now covers nearly one half – one half! – of the continental United States. That’s the most snow cover on December 2 since records began.



Snow Cover – 2 December 2019 – Image courtesy of NOAA “Snow covered the ground on nearly half of the real estate in the Lower 48 — 46.2 percent of land area — on Monday morning,’ writes Jason Samenow of the Capital Weather Gang ” (This is) the largest area on Dec. 2 since snow cover records from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began in 2003. Normally, a little more than a quarter of the nation has snow on the ground at this time of year.”

washingtonpost.com

wattsupwiththat.com

iceagenow.info

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To: isopatch who wrote (96179)12/5/2019 9:14:03 AM
From: Chu Berry
1 Recommendation   of 97949
 
A picture from my Balcony in Montréal this morning ! Almost looks like one of Jackson Pollock's dripping paintings from the fifties ...


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To: Chu Berry who wrote (96180)12/5/2019 9:56:58 AM
From: isopatch
1 Recommendation   of 97949
 
It does. Still no snow here other than a few flurries which quickly melt. Temps in the 50s, again later this week. Be happy to see cold and snow roar thru here and hit the hi population middle Atlantic states to get NG prices to 3 bucks...))

Unfortunately for the gas price, Lower 48 winter - so far - concentrated in the Rocky Mt. region and northern plains states. Prices won't do much until bone chilling cold comes to America's "megalopolis": The New York City to Washington D.C. corridor. And stays for awhile.

So far, not sign of that

Iso

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To: isopatch who wrote (96177)12/5/2019 10:31:36 AM
From: robert b furman
3 Recommendations   of 97949
 
Good Morning ISO,

While home shopping in 1981 (after Chevrolet moved me to Houston), I looked at homes in Tomball TX. Humble Oil Company had large gas wells in Tomball.

Part of the perks to drill in Tomball was free natural gas for rural locations.

I remember marveling at the outdoor pools being heated during the winter months. The steamy water would lift out of the pools all day.

Those homes were well above my pay range, but your story has brought back the memory.

P.S. I think you need to have a heated pool out in front of your greenhouse.

How relaxing to watch your seedlings sprout, as you sprint into the warm water. LOL

Bob

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From: isopatch12/5/2019 10:48:58 AM
2 Recommendations   of 97949
 
<The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported Thursday that domestic supplies of natural gas fell by 19 billion cubic feet for the week ended Nov. 29. Analysts expected a fall of 21 billion cubic feet, on average, according to a survey conducted by S&P Global Platts. Total stocks now stand at 3.591 trillion cubic feet, up 591 billion cubic feet from a year ago, but 9 billion cubic feet below the five-year average, the government said. January natural gas NGF20, +1.33% traded at $2.439 per million British thermal units, up 4 cents, or 1.7%, from Wednesday's settlement.>

marketwatch.com

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