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   PastimesLets not buy from These folks.


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To: Rich1 who wrote (110)4/3/2003 9:46:45 PM
From: Rich1
   of 120
 
Grub

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To: Rich1 who wrote (110)4/3/2003 9:48:33 PM
From: Carolyn
   of 120
 
Not surprising. At least they have more common sense than the French, who are forever on my sh$t list (not that that means anything.) Hit 'em in the old tourist pocket, I say.

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To: sandintoes who wrote (109)4/3/2003 9:50:35 PM
From: PatiBob
   of 120
 
I couldn't agree more.....

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To: sandintoes who wrote (109)4/3/2003 9:58:01 PM
From: PatiBob
   of 120
 
I was just remembering about a sign this old guy had on his property when I was a kid. His house looked like shit but that sign always had a fresh coat of paint on it and truth be told, with stood the wind better too.

It said "Get US out of the UN Member in good standing, John Birch Society, Louisiana Chapter, Jefferson Parish"

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To: sandintoes who wrote (109)4/3/2003 10:00:10 PM
From: sandintoes
   of 120
 
Plan Would Block French Iraq Contracts

By MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - Undeterred by a defeat in committee, a Republican congressman is pushing ahead with a plan intended to prevent French and German companies from getting U.S. contracts to rebuild Iraq (news - web sites).

The proposal failed in a 35-27 vote in the House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday, but Rep. George Nethercutt, R-Wash., said he believes support is growing and that he may prevail in the full House.

Nethercutt planned to offer an amendment, to an emergency war-spending bill, that would bar any rebuilding funds from going to businesses based in a country that "publicly expressed" opposition to the war.

To give the president some flexibility, the measure says contracts should be awarded "where possible" to companies from nations that have aided the United States in Iraq. The president could waive the ban if it hurts American jobs.

"The coalition of the unwilling should not participate in reconstruction with U.S. tax dollars," Nethercutt said.

Nethercutt's original amendment did not name countries, but a new proposal lists France, Germany, Russia, Syria and China.

Nethercutt's amendment is one of several efforts from Republicans to punish France for its refusal to support the U.S. war effort.

For example, the House has ordered its restaurants to rename french fries as "freedom fries" and Rep. Scott McInnis, R-Colo., is pushing a bill to stop using French-made headstones to bury U.S. servicemen at Arlington National Cemetery.

Nethercutt's amendment has generated strong opposition from Republicans and Democrats.

"It makes good rhetoric for a speech, but it is poor foreign policy," said John Scofield, GOP spokesman for the House Appropriations Committee. During debate in the committee, lawmakers from both parties said the plan would damage President Bush (news - web sites)'s ability to re-establish strong diplomatic relations with Germany and France after the war.

"I tried to urge my colleagues not to be swayed by the passions of the moment," said Rep. Jim Kolbe, R-Ariz.

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To: PatiBob who wrote (114)4/3/2003 10:00:50 PM
From: sandintoes
   of 120
 
OOPs the next one was suppose to go to you..

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To: sandintoes who wrote (115)4/3/2003 10:24:34 PM
From: PatiBob
   of 120
 
I seen that guy on TV this morning on FOX news.

Nethercutt planned to offer an amendment, to an emergency war-spending bill, that would bar any rebuilding funds from going to businesses based in a country that "publicly expressed" opposition to the war.

I don't see anything wrong with this. Why should they be able to bid on the rebuilding of they didn't want to help in the first place.

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To: sandintoes who wrote (116)4/3/2003 10:25:07 PM
From: PatiBob
   of 120
 
I got it!

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To: PatiBob who wrote (117)4/3/2003 11:27:23 PM
From: sandintoes
   of 120
 
Trans-Atlantic Dispute Over Iraq War Hits Trade
Thu Apr 3,12:33 PM ET

By Samuel Fromartz

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - France's opposition to the U.S.-led war in Iraq (news - web sites) has led to calls for a boycott of French goods, while Europeans have started avoiding American products such as Coca-Cola.

These actions show how a conflict in the political arena can spill over into trade, even though it may not be easy in today's global market to single out a purely national product.

In Washington, lawmakers last week called on Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld to cancel an $881 million contract with a French-owned food service company that feeds U.S. Marines, even though it employs Americans.

Small companies, whose retail trade makes them an obvious target for consumer action, have already been targeted.

"Since the beginning of January, our sales to the U.S. have decreased by 20 percent," said Marc Refabert, chief executive of Fromages.com, a company in Tours, France, that sells French cheese via a Web site.

Refabert attributed the decline to a combination of factors: the euro's increasing value, making French imports more expensive for Americans, the sluggish global economy, and France's stance on the war.

During the last six weeks, he said, the company has lost some 1,200 American customers. About 75 percent of the company's business comes from the United States.

Michael Yurch, president of Sherry-Lehmann Wine and Spirits in New York City, said some distributors report a declining demand for French wines. But he said his company has not felt any effect, so far.

"Oh, you get a comment here or there about our ads featuring French wines," Yurch said. "Some customers think it's inappropriate."

But that, he noted, was the exception.

Calls for boycotts have grown, however, even though their aim is less than precise since so many foreign companies employ Americans in the United States and so much trade is not visible to the public.

Shares in the giant French-owned food service company Sodexho Inc. fell last week after a news report that U.S. lawmakers were set to urge cancellation of the group's contract with the U.S. Marines. The company employs 110,000 Americans.

Nearly a quarter of all European-U.S. trade also consists of transactions within companies, according to Pascal Lamy, the E.U. Trade Commissioner. Unlike wine and cheese, that trade will not fall under scrutiny since the general public is not aware of it.

COMPLICATED PICTURE

The picture is further complicated by the fact that in 2001, the United States was the largest direct investor in France, according to the Invest in France government agency, creating 8,000 jobs.

Nevertheless, boycotts appeal to some consumers, which is why some German and French restaurants have been taking Coca-Cola off the menu.

In the United States, a recent poll by Fleishman-Hillard and Wirthlin Worldwide found 64 percent of Americans had a less favorable attitude toward French companies than before the war.



Of the respondents, 46 percent were likely to try a substitute product for one made in France, while 29 percent said they were more likely to "boycott or avoid" purchasing French goods.

"I think there are some warning signs here," said Philip Diehl, co-chair of Fleishman-Hillard's Public Affairs Practice. "I was surprised by how strong the consumer reaction was."

The poll also found a decline in interest among U.S. consumers for German and Canadian goods, because of those countries' views regarding the war.

Aside from German automobiles and French wine and cheese, however, American consumers had a tough time identifying foreign goods. They saw Heineken, for example, as a German import, though it is from the Netherlands, which is among the countries not opposed to the war effort.

Yoplait was pegged as a French yogurt brand, though it is owned by General Mills Inc., a U.S. company.

Considering that Germany's BMW makes automobiles in South Carolina and the German-American company DaimlerChrysler owns the Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep brands, the lines become further blurred.

So in this global environment, who would most likely be hurt by an American boycott? As far as French wines go, at least, "a lot of people who are small farmers," Yurch said.

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To: Carolyn who wrote (112)4/4/2003 6:07:49 AM
From: Rich1
   of 120
 
Dont know if you read this...
debka.com

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