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   PoliticsPres. George W. Bush


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To: calgal who wrote (567)7/23/2004 11:15:38 PM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
President Praises 'Very Constructive' 9/11 Report
NewsMax.com Wires
Thursday, July 22, 2004
WASHINGTON – President Bush praised as "very constructive" the recommendations in a new report Thursday on intelligence failures that led to Sept. 11, though his administration has reacted coolly toward a central proposal to establish a Cabinet-level national intelligence director.

Thomas H. Kean, Republican chairman, and Lee H. Hamilton, Democrat vice chairman, formally handed a copy of the independent commission's report in a ceremony in the Rose Garden. Bush had fought the creation of the panel, resisted the release of documents and battled against letting national security adviser Condoleezza Rice address the panel. But he embraced its work Thursday.
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Bush called the report's recommendations "very constructive" and said the commission had "done a really good job of learning about our country, learning what went wrong prior to Sept. 11 and making very solid, sound recommendations about how to move forward."
"I assured them that where government needs to act, we will," Bush said.

Kean praised Bush for allowing "unprecedented access to documents."

The report's primary recommendation is for a major overhaul of the nation's intelligence community, including the creation of a Cabinet-level intelligence director with authority over the CIA, FBI and other agencies.

Ridge: Too Much Bureaucracy Already

Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge said Wednesday: "I don't think you need a czar. We already had one level of bureaucracy that we don't need."

Hours after he received the final report of the Sept. 11 commission, the president was scheduled to outline a strategy to protect the country and details what he regards as the accomplishments in making America safer.

Bush will lay out his strategy in Glenview, Ill., where he speaks to an audience of first responders and leaders at a center that trains police officers, firefighters and public works personnel.

A coalition of organized labor, blacks and liberal Democrats helped Al Gore win Illinois by 12 percentage points in 2000, and John Kerry leads Bush this year in the state, which is getting its first visit this year from the president.

Bush's remarks come amid the conclusions in the Sept. 11 commission report that the hijackers exploited deep institutional failings within the U.S. government over a long period of time to carry out the attacks.

Before he leaves the White House for the Midwest, the president is signing the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act, an election-year measure long sought by police officers. It gives off-duty and retired officers the ability to carry their concealed firearms nationwide.

One of the largest groups representing police officers is supporting Bush rival John Kerry and says it wasn't invited to the signing ceremony, where the president will be surrounded by leaders of the law enforcement community.

"This administration cut $500 million ... and took officers off the street," said David Holway, president of International Brotherhood of Police Officers. "There are now fewer police officers than there were before Sept. 11."

Bush is highlighting the administration's progress in transforming the government into an instrument that can reliably thwart terrorist threats in any form.

At a fund-raiser Wednesday night, Bush sketched out a second-term domestic agenda that would shift focus to improving high school education and expanding access to health care.

"This nation is on a rising path, and with four more years we'll achieve more growth, new and higher-paying jobs and greater opportunity for all of our citizens," Bush told nearly 7,000 campaign donors who contributed $23 million to Republican lawmakers.

Bush offered only broad outlines of what his priorities would be, and no specific new initiatives. Aides said those would come later.

Earlier Wednesday, he signed into law Project BioShield to protect Americans against chemical, biological and nuclear attack, setting goals including stockpiling 75 million doses of anthrax vaccine beginning next year.

From changing the focus of the FBI to creating the Department of Homeland Security from 22 law enforcement entities, the Bush administration is building the case as the president's re-election campaign shifts into high gear that border security is tighter and that intelligence collection is improving markedly.

The government is coupling the new measures to what Bush says is the most important lesson of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks: confronting the enemy overseas so that America doesn't have to face more attacks at home.

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To: calgal who wrote (567)7/23/2004 11:17:23 PM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
NBC Admits Biased Pro-Kerry Media Fail to Hurt Bush in Polls

Yes, yes, we know that opinion polls are silly and inaccurate and that the only poll that matters is the one in the election booth, but some people enjoy poring over them. These folks should read on; everyone else should instead turn to, say, President Bush's speech today.

Three new surveys show Bush and John Kerry in a statistical tie.

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We've pointed out before how the pro-Democrat Los Angeles Times slants its surveys, and here's another example. Less-inaccurate surveys question "likely" voters, but the Times queried 1,529 registered voters nationwide from Saturday to Wednesday. People who are registered but don't vote are disproportionately Democrat.
Even with that advantage, Kerry led Bush by only 2 percentage points, according to Gray Davis' favorite newspaper. Kerry had 46 percent, Bush 44 percent and Ralph Nader 3 percent, with 7 percent undecided. When the poll excluded Nader, Kerry still had a 2-point edge.

"Kerry's lead is within the poll's margin of error [plus or minues 3 points] and smaller than his advantage last month in a Times poll," the paper admitted.

It said 51 percent approved of Bush's performance, with 48 percent disapproving.

Shocking admission: NBC reported today that the latest NBC/Wall Street Journal poll shows the "race is tied even though Kerry has received mostly positive media coverage since selecting Sen. John Edwards, D-N.C., as his running mate, while the Bush White House has seen less-than-positive news on key fronts."

"In a period that should be very good for the Democrats with the Edwards announcement, the president has more than held his own," said Democrat pollster Peter D. Hart, of NBC/Journal polling team Hart/Teeter. "Having said that, it still remains a contest which is exceptionally difficult for Bush. ... He continues to have an uphill walk."

This survey shows the Bush-Cheney ticket supported by 47 percent of registered voters and Kerry-Edwards by 45 percent. Two percent backed Nader and his running mate, Peter Camejo.

The margin of error: plus or minus 3 percentage points.

The previous NBC/Journal poll, released June 30, had Bush at 45 percent, Kerry at 44 percent and Nader at 4 percent.

The latest CNN/USA Today/Gallup Poll, released Thursday, showed 47 percent of likely voters were for Kerry, 46 percent for Bush and 4 percent for Nader. The margin of error was plus or minus 3.5 percentage points. With just Kerry and Bush, the numbers were 49 and 47.

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To: calgal who wrote (567)7/23/2004 11:17:32 PM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
Condi Resists Playing Bin Laden Blame Game

National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice said Thursday that ex-President Clinton probably thought he was doing the right thing when he turned down an offer from Sudan in 1996 to have Osama bin Laden arrested and shipped to the U.S.

"The fact is that I'm sure that there were many times when people made decisions that at the time seemed the appropriate decision," Dr. Rice told Fox News Channel's "Hannity & Colmes."

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She gave Clinton the benefit of the doubt after co-host Sean Hannity asked about NewsMax.com's recording of a February 2002 speech by the ex-president where he detailed the Sudanese offer.
"Doesn't that seem to validate the idea that the Sudan, in fact, did offer us bin Laden and we passed on him?" Hannity implored, noting that the 9/11 Commission had instead accepted Clinton's denials despite the smoking-gun tape.

"I've seen the reports of that," Rice told Hannity. "I don't know the veracity of it or anything. I don't know what the circumstances were."

Rice said the U.S. had failed to "add up what was happening to us" throughout the 1990s, adding that it wasn't until the 9/11 attacks that America realized al-Qaida was "an organization that we have to go after with full force."

newsmax.com

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To: calgal who wrote (567)7/23/2004 11:17:39 PM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
The incredible shrinking deficit
Jack Kemp

URL:http://www.townhall.com/columnists/jackkemp/jk20040719.shtml

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To: calgal who wrote (567)7/23/2004 11:17:48 PM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
The double binds of George W. Bush

URL:http://www.townhall.com/columnists/richlowry/rl20040719.shtml

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To: calgal who wrote (575)7/23/2004 11:25:04 PM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
The 'Bush Lied' folks can't be taken seriously
Michael Barone

URL:http://www.townhall.com/columnists/michaelbarone/mb20040719.shtml

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To: calgal who wrote (579)9/1/2004 3:16:37 AM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
Unlocking a key voter bloc
URL:http://www.washingtontimes.com/commentary/20040823-084232-6826r.htm

By Thomas Sowell

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To: calgal who wrote (579)9/1/2004 3:16:50 AM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
President Bush, Iraq and the Election
David Limbaugh (archive)
August 31, 200

URL:http://www.townhall.com/columnists/davidlimbaugh/dl20040831.shtml

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To: calgal who wrote (579)9/1/2004 3:17:22 AM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
From: Westi Tuesday, Aug 31, 2004 1:27 AM
Respond to of 6629

Terry Eastland
URL:http://www.jewishworldreview.com/0804/eastland.html

To appeal to conservatives, add some nuance to compassion

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To: calgal who wrote (579)9/1/2004 3:17:32 AM
From: calgal
   of 601
 
John H. Fund
URL:http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/fund.html

Tryout Time: The 2008 presidential campaign gets under way in New York.

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