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   Technology StocksHewlett-Packard (HPQ)


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To: engineer who wrote (4328)11/5/2015 1:54:34 PM
From: kumar
   of 4344
 
I was referring to the different web sites with no co-relational to Bill & Dave.'

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To: kumar who wrote (4329)11/5/2015 2:04:05 PM
From: Kirk ©
   of 4344
 
I'm not sure I follow.

The "HP Way" was sold off as Agilent and they spun off the original HP instrument company as Keysight last year.

I own both of those and I added to Keysight during the last market panic, fwiw.


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To: kumar who wrote (4329)11/5/2015 10:03:19 PM
From: engineer
   of 4344
 
take a look at Alphabet/Google, no real mention of Larry Page either...

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To: engineer who wrote (4331)11/6/2015 7:48:08 PM
From: engineer
   of 4344
 
on the split...

linkedin.com

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To: engineer who wrote (4332)11/6/2015 8:02:49 PM
From: engineer
   of 4344
 
more on split.

linkedin.com

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (4326)11/9/2015 5:36:15 AM
From: Mike Strauss
   of 4344
 
I hope HP can figure this out. They are huge in the PC sector but their losses gave them no choice but to split in order to recoup them. The fact that they are having trouble maintaining their cloud based technologies is not a good sign. I guess we'll see what happens in Q4 and Q1 of next year.

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From: Sr K5/24/2016 5:30:32 PM
2 Recommendations   of 4344
 
HPQ split off HPE; now HPE is merging into CSC (which also split off part of its operations):

finance.yahoo.com

There's no HPE board at SI, but I've reactivated a dormant CSC board, with the above link.

100,000 employees (mostly from the former EDS which HPQ bought in 2008) go from HPE to CSC.

AH (5:32 PM) CSC is up 23% and HPE is up 10%.

The post before this one was 11/9/2015, there are 125 SubjectMarks.

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From: Glenn Petersen7/29/2016 8:10:54 PM
   of 4344
 
Private equity firms focused on Hewlett Packard asset sales: sources

Reuters
Fri Jul 29, 2016 3:36pm EDT

Buyout firms are focused on acquiring some software assets that Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co (HPE) ( HPE.N) has been considering divesting, worth between $6 billion and $8 billion, rather than the entire company, people familiar with the matter said on Friday.

The sources asked not to be identified because the deliberations are confidential.

Earlier, The Information reported that private equity firms including KKR & Co LP ( KKR.N), Apollo Global Management LLC ( APO.N) and Carlyle Group LP ( CG.O) were "sniffing around" Hewlett Packard Enterprise, contemplating a buyout worth more than $40 billion. The Information cited a source who has had talks with representatives of the private equity firms.

HPE declined to comment, while KKR, Apollo and Carlyle offered no immediate comment.

(Reporting by Liana B. Baker in San Francisco and Greg Roumeliotis in New York; Editing by Marguerita Choy)

reuters.com

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From: TimF9/19/2016 6:29:51 PM
   of 4344
 
HP’s DRM sabotages off-brand printer ink cartridges with self-destruct date
arstechnica.com

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From: Glenn Petersen6/16/2017 12:29:30 AM
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The DOE funding will be used by the tech companies to further the research and development into exascale computers. Hewlett Packard Enterprise, for example, last month demonstrated a prototype of a new memory-driven computer called The Machine, which it will further develop with the additional funds by the government. The system is HP Enterprise’s largest research and development program in the history of the company. That computing system is capable of simultaneously working with the data held in every book in the Library of Congress five times over, about 160 million books.

U.S. Invests $258 Million in Supercomputing Race With China

Energy Department to award cash to six tech companies to develop world’s fastest computers

By Rachael King
The Wall Street Journal
June 15, 2017 2:00 p.m. ET



In June 2016, China’s Sunway TaihuLight supercomputer took the top spot in a twice-yearly ranking of the 500 fastest scientific computers. Photo: Li Xiang/Xinhua/Associated Press
______________________________________

The U.S. government is trying to stave off China and other countries challenging the U.S. for dominance in the next generation of the world’s fastest computers.

The Department of Energy on Thursday said it would award $258 million over three years to be shared by six tech companies, as part of a plan to develop new supercomputers that can crunch data at least 50 times faster than the nation’s most powerful systems today.

The companies are Advanced Micro Devices Inc., AMD -2.29% Cray Inc., CRAY -1.97% Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. HPE -1.31% , International Business Machines Corp. IBM 0.27% , Intel Corp. INTC -0.62% and Nvidia Corp. NVDA 0.43%

U.S. government leaders warned in a September 2016 technical meeting convened by the National Security Agency and the DOE that the country was in danger of losing its leadership in supercomputers to China. Governments have long used these systems to crack codes and develop nuclear weapons, and the supercomputers have business purposes such as oil exploration and auto design.

The U.S. is in a “horse race” with China, the European Union and Japan as they attempt to outdo one another in processing power, said Steve Conway, senior vice president of research at Hyperion Research.

The fastest U.S. computer, the Titan, built by Cray, can handle 17,590 trillion calculations per second, or the rough equivalent of 11.6 million iPad Pros running at the same time. It is about the size of a basketball court and is said to use enough power to run a small town.

By 2021, the U.S. plans to deliver at least one “exascale” system which performs one quintillion—a billion billion—calculations per second. That would be one year later than when China has said it plans to deploy its first system. Both countries are anticipated to deliver production-ready systems that can solve problems at exascale speeds by as soon as 2023, according to Hyperion Research.

In June 2016, China took the top spot in a twice-yearly ranking of the 500 fastest scientific computers. China’s machine, called the Sunway TaihuLight, marked the first time China had taken the top speed ranking without using U.S. semiconductor technology. China also, for the first time, placed more machines than the U.S. on the so-called Top 500 list, by 167 to 165. In a November 2016 ranking, the U.S. and China each had 171 systems on the list.

The DOE funding will be used by the tech companies to further the research and development into exascale computers. Hewlett Packard Enterprise, for example, last month demonstrated a prototype of a new memory-driven computer called The Machine, which it will further develop with the additional funds by the government. The system is HP Enterprise’s largest research and development program in the history of the company. That computing system is capable of simultaneously working with the data held in every book in the Library of Congress five times over, about 160 million books.

Hyperion Research estimates that the price to research, develop and buy a U.S. exascale system will total about $300 million to $500 million per system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory spent about $97 million to buy the Titan supercomputer from Cray. While the U.S. government is typically the first buyer for these systems, the technology advances usually trickle down to other computing products at lower prices.

Write to Rachael King at rachael.king@wsj.com

Appeared in the June 16, 2017, print edition as 'AMD, Five Others to Get U.S. Supercomputer Funds.'

wsj.com

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