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   PastimesYour opinion please Legalization of Street Drugs


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From: TimF12/31/2019 6:28:08 PM
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Illinois’ governor granted more than 11,000 pardons for low-level marijuana convictions on Tuesday, describing the step as a first wave of thousands of such expungements anticipated under the state’s new marijuana legalization law.
apnews.com

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From: TimF2/4/2020 8:59:23 AM
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A false positive drug test prompted the authorities to take an Alabama mom's newborn, just four hours after she gave birth. The hospital "declined to comment on why [Rebecca Hernandez] was drug tested in the first place," says NBC. But "in many parts of the state, hospitals test mothers without their consent, and tests are often done on a case-by-case basis" that winds up biased against poor women.

A 2015 investigation from ProPublica found that Alabama's rules—aimed at stopping drug use by pregnant women and new mothers—are some of the most strict in the country.

Hernandez has since been reunited with her new son, but the experience was a "nightmare," she told WAFF last week.

Her doctor, Yashica Robinson, said the false positive probably came from Hernandez eating a poppy seed muffin the day before she went into labor. Robinson criticized same-day drugs tests that trigger the takeaway of newborn children and said hospitals should wait on lab-confirmed results, which in this case cleared Hernandez.

from reason.com

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From: TimF2/4/2020 1:30:31 PM
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Judge Finds That the Houston Narcotics Officer Whose Lies Killed a Couple in 2019 Framed Another Suspect in 2008
Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg says it's reasonable to presume that Gerald Goines also lied in other drug cases.
Jacob Sullum | 2.3.2020

When Houston narcotics officer Gerald Goines arrested Otis Mallet in 2008, he described a crack cocaine purchase in which Mallet retrieved the drug from a can inside a truck and handed it to his brother, Steven, whom Goines had paid $200. Thanks to Goines' testimony, Mallet was sentenced to eight years in prison. But today, the Houston Chronicle reports, Harris County prosecutors joined Mallet's lawyers in urging a judge to declare him "actually innocent" because Goines "repeatedly lied about nearly every aspect" of the case. The judge agreed.

The handling of Mallet's case seems to be in character for Goines, who wrote the fraudulent search warrant affidavit for the January 2019 drug raid that killed a middle-aged couple, Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas, in their home on Harding Street. To justify the Harding Street raid, which resulted in state murder charges and federal civil rights charges against Goines, the officer invented a heroin purchase by a nonexistent confidential informant. His story about Mallet's involvement in the 2008 crack deal appears to have been equally fictitious.

"Now we know [Goines] was lying and using the district attorney's office as a tool to convict people wrongfully as early as 2008," said Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg, whose office is reviewing some 14,000 cases involving Goines and other members of the Houston Police Department's Narcotics Division. "Anybody who was convicted as a result of Gerald Goines' testimony, or involvement in a case that is significant or relevant, will now be given a presumption when they file their writ that Goines' testimony or evidence in their case was false."

Mallet, who served two years in prison before he was released on parole, has always maintained that Goines framed him. "Goines gave conflicting testimony about why he didn't use marked bills," the Chronicle reports. "Mallet's neighbors disputed seeing him engage in a drug deal or carrying the blue can Goines said he'd handled." And while Goines claimed in an expense report that he paid $200 to a confidential informant who helped incriminate the Mallet brothers, he testified that he gave that money directly to Steven Mallet.

Goines declined to testify during Otis Mallet's hearing, citing the Fifth Amendment's protection against self-incrimination. Ogg said Goines' silence about Mallet's case is "compelling evidence that the entire alleged narcotics transaction was a fraud." Judge Ramona Franklin's recommendation that Mallet be declared innocent will be reviewed by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals.

Ogg said the Mallet case "raises questions about how buy money was being issued by the Houston Police Department's narcotics division and used by narcotics officers like Gerald Goines, and how drug payouts were being supervised—and audited." Goines was employed by the department for 34 years before he retired in the wake of the raid that killed Tuttle and Nicholas. If he routinely lied to incriminate people that he arrested during that long career, the fault for such fraud and the resulting injustices cannot be his alone.

reason.com

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From: TimF3/20/2020 9:52:21 AM
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A New York Police Officer Was Caught on Camera Apparently Planting Marijuana in a Car — for the Second Time
theintercept.com

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From: TimF4/6/2020 11:00:18 PM
1 Recommendation   of 2221
 
The Drug War on the Constitution
By Steven Duke

America’s Longest War was declared by Richard Nixon more than a quarter of a century ago. It has been a total failure in keeping drugs from entering the country. Whether it has significantly contributed to the reduction of drug abuse is debatable. But there is one arena in which victory has been achieved: the Constitution has surrendered. If there is any phase of American life in which the rights of the people have not diminished during the drug war, it has escaped my notice. The anti-constitutional effects of the drug war have been so relentlessly obvious for so long that a cynic might wonder whether the Constitution is not the true enemy of the drug warriors.

cato.org

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From: TimF4/13/2020 11:57:36 AM
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Virginia just decriminalized marijuana
The state is the 27th to decriminalize or legalize marijuana.
vox.com

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From: TimF4/14/2020 5:58:44 PM
3 Recommendations   of 2221
 
Why the War on Drugs is a War on People

youtube.com

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From: TimF4/16/2020 9:57:00 PM
1 Recommendation   of 2221
 

reddit.com

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From: TimF7/1/2020 10:08:09 PM
1 Recommendation   of 2221
 
Want to Reform the Criminal Justice System?
End the Drug War.Drug prohibition increases conflict between citizens and the police.
John Stossel | 7.1.2020
reason.com

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