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   Strategies & Market TrendsSpeculating in Takeover Targets


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To: Jack Hartmann who wrote (4489)7/2/2017 3:58:03 PM
From: Glenn Petersen
   of 6101
 
It took over a year and a half to die. The Walgreens shareholders come out okay; the Rite Aid shareholders will have tax losses.

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To: richardred who wrote (4396)7/11/2017 1:27:30 PM
From: richardred
   of 6101
 
RE- CTG Exercised a bunch of CTG leap calls at 5. I still like the prospects moving forward.

P.S. Back to work today- Sigh...
A great sunset at Clearwater Florida, before a great Fireworks show on the 4th of July.




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To: richardred who wrote (4369)7/14/2017 8:51:09 AM
From: richardred
   of 6101
 
RE/TDC Becomes a hunter with it's cash. Maybe a chance to get some growth back. However they most likely paid up front for it.

Teradata Acquires San Diego-based Start-up StackIQ to Strengthen Teradata Everywhere and IntelliCloud Capabilities

Acquisition bolsters Teradata’s build and delivery capability of on-premises and hybrid cloud solutions for its enterprise customers
Teradata (NYSE: TDC), the leading data and analytics company, today announced the acquisition of StackIQ, developers of one of the industry’s fastest bare metal software provisioning platforms which has managed the deployment of cloud and analytics software at millions of servers in data centers around the globe. The deal will leverage StackIQ’s expertise in open source software and large cluster provisioning to simplify and automate the deployment of Teradata Everywhere. Offering customers the speed and flexibility to deploy Teradata solutions across hybrid cloud environments, allows them to innovate quickly and build new analytical applications for their business.

In addition to technology assets, the acquisition also includes StackIQ’s talented team of engineers, who will join Teradata’s R&D organization to help accelerate the company’s ability to automate software deployment in operations, engineering and end-user customer ecosystems.

“Teradata prides itself on building and investing in solutions that make life easier for our customers,” said Oliver Ratzesberger, Executive Vice President and Chief Product Officer for Teradata. “Only the best, most innovative and applicable technology is added to our ecosystem, and StackIQ delivers with products that excel in their field. Adding StackIQ technology to IntelliFlex, IntelliBase and IntelliCloud will strengthen our capabilities and enable Teradata to redefine how systems are deployed and managed globally.”

“Our incredibly high standards also apply to the people we hire,” continued Ratzesberger. “As Teradata continues to expand its engineering (R&D) skills to drive ongoing technology innovation, we are seeking qualified, talented individuals to join our team. Once again, StackIQ has set the bar with stellar engineers who we are honored to now call Teradata employees.”

Under terms of the deal, Teradata will now own StackIQ’s unique IP that automates and accelerates software deployment across large clusters of servers (both physical and virtual/in the cloud). This increase in automation will occur across all Teradata Everywhere deployments, dramatically reducing build and delivery times for complex business analytics solutions and adding the capability to manage software-only “appliances” across hybrid cloud infrastructure. The speed of Teradata’s new integrated solution also allows for rapid re-provisioning of internal test or benchmarking hardware, as well as swift redeployment between technologies to match a customer’s changing workload requirements.

“Joining Teradata, the market leader in analytic data solutions, truly validates the importance of StackIQ’s engineering and the talent we have cultivated over the years,” said Tim McIntire, Co-Founder at StackIQ. “We are looking forward to bringing a bit of San Diego’s start-up culture to Teradata, and working together to simplify Teradata’s customer experience for system software deployment and upgrades.”
The terms of the acquisition agreement were not disclosed.

teradata.com

BlackRock Inc. Has $242.78 Million Stake in Teradata Corporation (TDC)
BlackRock Inc. boosted its stake in shares of Teradata Corporation (NYSE:TDC) by 5,397.6% during the first quarter, according to its most recent 13F filing with the SEC. The firm owned 7,801,522 shares of the technology company’s stock after buying an additional 7,659,614 shares during the period. BlackRock Inc. owned about 0.06% of Teradata Corporation worth $242,782,000 as of its most recent filing with the SEC. Several other hedge funds and other institutional investors have also recently made changes to their positions in TDC. Advantus Capital Management Inc boosted its position in shares of Teradata Corporation by 0.6% in the first quarter. Advantus Capital Management Inc now owns 12,936 shares of the technology company’s stock valued at $403,000 after buying an additional 78 shares during the last quarter. Great West Life Assurance Co. Can boosted its position in shares of Teradata Corporation by 0.3% in the first quarter. Great West Life Assurance Co. Can now owns 34,190 shares of the technology company’s stock valued at $1,064,000 after buying an additional 86 shares during the last quarter. Comerica Bank boosted its position in shares of Teradata Corporation by 0.3% in the first quarter. Comerica Bank now owns 31,346 shares of the technology company’s stock valued at $921,000 after buying an additional 98 shares during the last quarter. New Mexico Educational Retirement Board boosted its position in shares of Teradata Corporation by 0.8% in the first quarter. New Mexico Educational Retirement Board now owns 13,298 shares of the technology company’s stock valued at $414,000 after buying an additional 100 shares during the last quarter. Finally, Arizona State Retirement System boosted its position in shares of Teradata Corporation by 0.6% in the first quarter. Arizona State Retirement System now owns 32,354 shares of the technology company’s stock valued at $1,007,000 after buying an additional 200 shares during the last quarter.

Shares of Teradata Corporation ( TDC) opened at 29.27 on Friday. The stock has a market capitalization of $3.78 billion, a price-to-earnings ratio of 22.83 and a beta of 1.26. The firm’s 50-day moving average is $28.55 and its 200-day moving average is $29.53. Teradata Corporation has a 52 week low of $25.46 and a 52 week high of $33.32.



Teradata Corporation (NYSE:TDC) last released its quarterly earnings data on Thursday, April 27th. The technology company reported $0.28 earnings per share for the quarter, meeting the consensus estimate of $0.28. The business had revenue of $491 million for the quarter, compared to analyst estimates of $497.29 million. Teradata Corporation had a return on equity of 28.55% and a net margin of 7.45%. The company’s revenue was down 9.9% compared to the same quarter last year. During the same period in the previous year, the company posted $0.47 EPS. On average, equities research analysts anticipate that Teradata Corporation will post $1.25 EPS for the current fiscal year.

Several brokerages have recently weighed in on TDC. Stifel Nicolaus reissued a “hold” rating and set a $32.00 price target on shares of Teradata Corporation in a research report on Monday. BidaskClub raised shares of Teradata Corporation from a “hold” rating to a “buy” rating in a research report on Tuesday, June 27th. TheStreet cut shares of Teradata Corporation from a “b-” rating to a “c” rating in a research report on Thursday, April 27th. BMO Capital Markets lowered their price target on shares of Teradata Corporation from $32.00 to $30.00 and set a “market perform” rating on the stock in a research report on Thursday, April 27th. Finally, Sanford C. Bernstein initiated coverage on shares of Teradata Corporation in a research report on Wednesday, May 24th. They issued an “underperform” rating and a $25.00 target price on the stock. Six research analysts have rated the stock with a sell rating, nine have issued a hold rating and one has given a buy rating to the company. Teradata Corporation presently has a consensus rating of “Hold” and a consensus target price of $28.78.

About Teradata Corporation

Teradata Corporation is a provider of analytic data platforms, analytic applications and related services. The Company’s segments include Americas region (North America and Latin America) and International region (Europe, Middle East, Africa, Asia Pacific and Japan). Its offerings include analytics solutions, ecosystem architecture consulting and hybrid cloud solutions.

Want to see what other hedge funds are holding TDC? Visit HoldingsChannel.com to get the latest 13F filings and insider trades for Teradata Corporation (NYSE:TDC).



watchlistnews.com

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From: Paul Senior7/14/2017 2:03:59 PM
   of 6101
 
ZBH. "Jana granted regulatory clearance for Zimmer Biomet stake"

finance.yahoo.com

I up my shares by a few.

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From: Glenn Petersen7/16/2017 10:18:06 AM
1 Recommendation   of 6101
 
How long will it be before a Silicon Valley company such as Alphabet or Apple seriously considers buying a major car manufacturer? Ford's market cap is $46.5 billion and GM's is only $54.5 billion. The potential valuation of Waymo (the spinout of Alphabet's self-driving division) has been estimated as high as $70 billion. One potential problem for the technology company would be that the acquisition of a car manufacturer might make it difficult to sell its technology to other manufacturers.

Detroit’s Urgent Embrace of Self-Driving Cars

By Jeffrey Rothfeder
The New Yorker
July 10, 2017



At last count, G.M. had already built nearly two hundred Chevrolet Bolt electric self-driving vehicles, the most of any automaker.
Photograph by Jeffrey Sauger / General Motors
___________________________________

Last Friday, Tesla’s Model 3, the upstart automaker’s first mid-priced, mass-market electric vehicle, began rolling off the assembly line. The Model 3’s price (around thirty-five thousand dollars), its range before needing to recharge (about two hundred and fifteen miles), and relatively inexpensive, high-performance battery pack have received a great deal of attention. But other automakers are increasingly more interested in another aspect of the Model 3: a self-driving system called Autopilot that, according to Tesla, uses cameras, radar, and ultrasonic sensors to see through rain and fog, set speed based on traffic conditions, stay in a lane, pass slow-moving vehicles, exit freeways, and park without driver input. Tesla’s C.E.O., Elon Musk, predicted recently that in about two years people will be able to go to sleep in a moving Tesla and wake up to find they have arrived at their destination.

Traditional automakers have been dabbling in self-driving research for about two years, but with little urgency. Lately, though, attitudes have shifted dramatically. Suddenly, the prospect of autonomous vehicles looms as a tangible threat to traditional cars, and auto companies are plowing ahead with driverless experimentation, worried that if they don’t they’ll be left behind. That fear is behind a flurry of recent activity. Last year, General Motors purchased Cruise Automation, a self-driving software company, for about a billion dollars, and invested five hundred million dollars in Lyft, the ride service, to create an autonomous vehicle network. At last count, G.M. had already built nearly two hundred Chevrolet Bolt electric self-driving vehicles, the most of any automaker. Nissan has joined forces with NASA’s Ames Research Center to develop terrestrial and space-ready driving machines that can navigate complex terrains with no human input, slated to be commercially available by around 2020, roughly the same year that Fiat Chrysler, BMW, Honda, Mercedes, and Ford plan to launch their driverless vehicles. Ford opened an R. & D. center in Palo Alto in 2015 and, subsequently, established a Smart Mobility unit. Skittishness about the imminent impact of autonomous cars was one reason that the Ford C.E.O. Mark Fields lost his job, in May. Ford’s stock price had fallen but, more important, Bill Ford had become impatient with the slow progress of his company’s self-driving car project. The new C.E.O., Jim Hackett, had been the first head of the company’s Smart Mobility unit.

What changed? Put simply, Silicon Valley discovered Detroit. Pursuing new revenue streams outside of their usual markets, firms like Google, Apple, and Uber, along with well-heeled venture capitalists, poured hundreds of billions of dollars into partnerships and internal design teams to produce hardware and software for self-driving electric cars. It was a natural fit, a by-product of the advanced research in robotics and artificial intelligence that tech companies were already focussed on.

These investments linked previously unrelated businesses. Apple invested a billion dollars in the Chinese ride-sharing firm Didi Chuxing, mainly to amass a database of knowledge about vehicle and driving maneuvers on busy streets. Uber also took a stake in Didi Chuxing, while Google invested in Lyft. The chipmaker Nvidia teamed up with the German mapping company Here to develop A.I.-based G.P.S. systems for driverless cars. And, in the biggest deal, a few months ago, Intel paid fifteen billion dollars for Mobileye, an Israeli maker of digital-vision systems for navigating complex traffic environments.

All told, a few dozen partnerships and startups involving autonomous vehicles surfaced in just the past couple of years—a wave of activity involving the auto industry that is astonishing to veteran observers. As Doug Newcomb, a longtime auto journalist and now the president of C3, a Web site devoted to car technology, told me, “Auto companies are conservative; they weren’t ready for this onslaught of outsiders at first. What industry would be? This never happens.”

Sacrificing profits in the short term, Silicon Valley firms are jockeying for position to provide the first glimpses of what the future of automobiles and transportation could be. (The Boston Consulting Group forecasts that, by 2035, autos with autonomous vehicle features will capture twenty-five per cent of the new car market.) Uber’s Otto unit made news not long ago when its driverless truck covered a hundred and twenty miles in Colorado, from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs, to drop off two thousand cases of Budweiser at a warehouse. The semi stood out on the highway with its curious sign: “Proudly Brewed. Self-Driven.” Google has fielded a fleet of some seven hundred self-driving vehicles, including Lexus S.U.V.s, Chrysler Pacific minivans, and a custom-built, bubble-shaped design oddity called Firefly. Since Google began its autonomous vehicle skunkworks, in 2009, its cars (now managed by a subsidiary called Waymo) have driven more than three million miles on public roads in California, Texas, Arizona, and Washington.

The magnitude of the technology investments has created a quandary for traditional automobile companies. They could cede a seemingly soon-to-be lucrative portion of their industry to Silicon Valley, essentially serving as subcontractors to the likes of Apple and Google, making shells of cars while the technology companies add their own sensors and software. That would leave the automakers with minimal profits from each vehicle, no residual revenue from, say, maintenance and service, and diminishing relationships with car buyers, their natural customer base. Or they could do the opposite—that is, treat the technology companies as suppliers and learn how to build autonomous cars themselves. They chose the latter.

One utopian vision of the future—one not necessarily shared by automakers—is that self-driving vehicles will ultimately lead to the elimination of individual car ownership. In this perspective, cities are emptied of traditional vehicles, while automated cars roam the streets twenty-four hours a day, on call via the cloud for anyone wanting a ride to the supermarket or the airport. Every shopping mall, airport, and school district would be navigated by self-driving shuttles.

If you believe this landscape is possible, then the economic rationale for purchasing an automobile falls apart. One prominent report, by the Rocky Mountain Institute, an environmental think tank, found that using an automated-mobility service—similar to Uber and Lyft but driverless—would cost consumers about the same as owning and operating a sedan, less than a dollar per mile, with none of the headaches of maintenance, parking, and battling traffic in a bad commute. A second study, by technology analysts RethinkX, argued that autonomous vehicles “will end the model of car ownership itself.” By 2030, the group said, ninety-five per cent of all U.S. passenger miles will be served by self-driving fleets—from two seaters to eighteen wheelers—and the average American family will save five thousand and six hundred dollars per year in transportation costs. The implication of these studies is that the car companies today are spending, in many cases, more than one-fifth of their R. & D. budgets to help perfect technology that could mostly put them out of business.

There are a number of obstacles to this scenario, the biggest of which might be that car companies are in business to make profits and will do their best to insure they maintain their sales market. There are also technological hurdles to a completely driverless world. The driverless car that is fully capable of taking itself anywhere, never needs human assistance, and has no controls for people to operate does not yet exist. The machine cognition needed to calculate how to navigate a road with one lane blocked by an emergency vehicle and a flagman intermittently waving cars through is well beyond anything invented today. In fact, most self-driving cars are afraid to leave their lane and, thus, can easily hiccup in stop-and-go mode behind a mail truck for miles—and a four-way stop sign can lead to paralysis.

It will take some doing to get to the point where cars don’t need drivers, but safety experts are hoping for that outcome quickly. The number of highway deaths has risen distressingly in the last few years, to about forty thousand in the U.S. and well over a million worldwide—and as many as ninety-six per cent of these fatalities are the result of driver mistakes. Frustrated by not being able to put a dent in these statistics, the National Highway and Safety Administration, in September, issued detailed guidelines for testing and deploying autonomous vehicles and, at the same time, endorsed self-driving cars as a way to “dramatically decrease the number of crashes tied to human choices and behavior.” Still, that holds only if the human is never trusted with the wheel. In a number of studies, carmakers have found that people in self-driving vehicles are inadequate backup drivers—unable to quickly judge situations around them when called upon to drive suddenly, pulled away from a distraction like a cell phone, video game, or streaming movie. In other words, given our propensity for road rage and our inability to ignore the allure of a text message, maybe the smartest thing we could do is put our lives in the hands of dispassionate machines. At least, that’s what Silicon Valley is banking on.

Jeffrey Rothfeder is a former editor-in-chief of the International Business Times and a former national news editor at Bloomberg News. His latest book is “Driving Honda: Inside the World’s Most Innovative Car Company.”

newyorker.com

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To: Paul Senior who wrote (4493)7/17/2017 12:27:10 PM
From: richardred
   of 6101
 
RE- P&G/Nelson Peltz There seems to be a some recent activism going on among some notables.

The CEO of Zimmer left abruptly. IMO the company is quite big for a takeover in it's space. However with all the big merger these days, Nothing surprises me that much any more. RE- INCR/inVentiv Health- As you know big companies are often broken up or merged with competing companies. This for improving margins and cost synergies. Generally a positive market reaction if the street likes the combo. Maybe the company gets a board seat to get the process started and get some value out?

P.S. IMO if a tax on medical devices ultimately gets repealed. It should help this company and this sector.

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To: richardred who wrote (4326)7/20/2017 10:18:40 AM
From: richardred
   of 6101
 
RE:SHLM I'm looking for a possible re-entry on the earnings miss.

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From: richardred7/25/2017 10:09:15 PM
   of 6101
 
Sold HUBG Hub Group for a quick profit.

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To: richardred who wrote (4463)7/25/2017 10:15:16 PM
From: richardred
   of 6101
 
Sold AVT for a quick profit.

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To: richardred who wrote (4498)7/25/2017 10:16:54 PM
From: richardred
   of 6101
 
Re-TDC leap calls expired worthless on this past Fri.

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