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   Biotech / MedicalGMED - GenoMed Inc.


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From: jmhollen8/21/2006 10:10:06 AM
   of 347
 
GenoMed's Third Horse with Presumed West Nile Virus Encephalitis Is Better in 24 Hours

David W. Moskowitz MD
GenoMed
St. Louis, Missouri
Tel. 314.983.9938
dwmoskowitz@genomed.com

ST. LOUIS—August 21, 2006--GenoMed (OTC Pink Sheets GMED), a Next Generation Disease Management company that uses genomics to solve diseases in as many species as possible, today announced that the third horse in its expanded trial for West Nile virus encephalitis recovered markedly within 24 hours after starting GenoMed's treatment.

On Thursday afternoon last week, a horse owner in Fresno, California telephoned GenoMed to say that her horse could no longer walk straight and was falling down. The horse had not been vaccinated for West Nile virus, and the diagnosis by the veterinarian was presumed West Nile virus encephalitis.

Within 24 hours of the first dose of GenoMed's treatment, the horse was chasing other horses away from his food, which they had been eating while he was sick.

West Nile virus encephalitis affects horses more severely than people, and the odds of recovery are slimmer. As with people, recovery from viral encephalitis usually takes at least a week. Recovery within 24 hours, like GenoMed's three horses and most of GenoMed's human patients, is extremely unusual.

Said Dr. Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, "It's always thrilling to see a clinical trial showing great results. Every trial is really just a gamble. Fortunately, this one seems to be continuing to pay off. All our evidence for the past four years, in humans, birds, and now horses, has been extremely positive."

GenoMed's treatment success rate for WNV encephalitis in people is currently 87% (20 of 23 patients improved rapidly). A small case series involving the company's first 8 patients was published in a peer-reviewed medical journal in 2004.

About GenoMed

Anyone can download the human protocol for West Nile virus for free from GenoMed's website, www.genomed.com, at any time. Horse owners are encouraged to contact Dr. Moskowitz directly (see contact information above) to discuss dosing.

.

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From: jmhollen8/29/2006 9:31:06 AM
   of 347
 
GenoMed Cleared by Indian Government to Distribute Healthcare to India

Contact:
David Moskowitz MD
CEO, GenoMed, Inc.
St. Louis, Missouri
www.genomed.com
Tel. 314-983-9933
Email: dwmoskowitz@genomed.com

Ms. Sujata Mital
Director, Sumit Biosciences Pvt Ltd.
Mumbai, India
www.sumitbiomedical.com
Email: sumit_exports@yahoo.com


ST. LOUIS, August 29, 2006 -- GenoMed, Inc. (Pink Sheets GMED) a Next Generation Disease Management (DM) company whose business is public health™, announced today that it has obtained clearance, through their Indian distributor Sumit Biosciences Pvt Ltd, from the Indian Government to market its Next Generation DM™ product in India.

The cost is under US $150 per patient per year. Since the per capita income in India is around $600 a year, GenoMed's Next Generation DM™ service is well within the reach of the average Indian citizen.

Sumit Biosciences Pvt Ltd is currently enlisting physicians at the King Edward Memorial Hospital in Mumbai to offer GenoMed's protocols to their patients. Mumbai, formerly called Bombay, is the fourth largest city in the world, with 12 million inhabitants.

Dr. David Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, said, "The US and Europe have been completely uninterested in our published methods for preventing kidney dialysis and slowing down emphysema. The $25 billion a year that the US spends on dialysis may actually serve as a perverse financial disincentive not to eliminate the industry. India spends nothing on dialysis, so nobody there has a financial stake in preserving the dialysis industry."

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "It's as if the Directors of the TB sanitaria in the US ignored streptomycin in 1950 to save their jobs. It's a shame that the taxpayers of the US and Europe are paying for genomics-based medicine, but citizens of developing countries like India are the only ones using it."

About GenoMed™

GenoMed is the only biotechnology company serious about both lowering healthcare costs and improving patient outcomes. It is leading the clinical revolution made possible by knowing which genes cause which diseases. GenoMed is currently marketing its protocols to prevent kidney failure due to high blood pressure and diabetes, and to delay the progression of emphysema. The company is offering its Healthchip®, on a research basis only, to predict breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate cancer in Caucasians. And GenoMed is in the process of creating a virtual pharmaceutical company to develop new drugs for the hundreds of cancer chemotherapy targets it has discovered, where no drug yet exists.

.

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From: Tadsamillionaire9/1/2006 4:51:12 PM
   of 347
 
West Nile virus warnings posted in Livermore and Pleasanton
By Meera Pal
CONTRA COSTA TIMES
Signs have been posted in Livermore parks and at the Alameda County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton, warning residents that several birds, squirrels and mosquitoes were found infected with West Nile virus.

While no human cases of West Nile virus have been reported in Alameda County, officials from the county's Mosquito Abatement District say it is a matter of time.

"We are going to see a human case pretty soon in Tri-Valley," said John Rusmisel, district manager. "These cases are more concentrated."

The district was first notified of a dead bird in southwest Livermore on Aug. 6. Lab results came back positive for West Nile virus. Since then, the district has collected five infected birds and one squirrel and identified three positive mosquito pools in southwest Livermore.

This morning, warning signs were posted at El Padro and Max Baer parks in Livermore and in the general vicinity.

The abatement district is concentrating on an area bordered by Isabel Avenue on the west side, Highway 84 on the east, and El Caminito and Stanley Boulevard on the north in Livermore and at the fairgrounds in Pleasanton.

The district is treating and keeping an eye on catch basins, storm drains and swimming pools in that area, Rusimelhe said.

According to the district's Web site, "mosquitoes need stagnant water in order to lay their eggs . . . if it can hold water for more than a few days, it can breed mosquitoes."

So far this year, Rusmisel said the district has positively identified 17 birds with the virus in Alameda County, compared to last year's total of 48. This year, they have marked seven positive mosquito pools, two at the fairgrounds in Pleasanton.

"This is the first time we have put up signs" anywhere in the county, Rusmisel said.

It is the concentration of infected mosquito pools in the area that cause concern, he said. Birds can fly in from other locations. Infected mosquitoes make it easier to transfer the disease to humans.
PREVENT MOSQUITO BITES

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about 20 percent of people who become infected with the virus will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches. The illness can last anywhere between a few days to several weeks.

"People describe it as the worst headache they've ever had," Rusmisel said.

The signs are not intended to alarm anyone, but to remind Tri-Valley residents that the threat of West Nile virus is real.

mercurynews.com

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From: donpat9/11/2006 6:07:06 PM
   of 347
 
GenoMed: Cure for Sickle Cell Pain

Monday September 11, 9:30 am ET

ST. LOUIS, Sept. 11 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- GenoMed (Pink Sheets: GMED - News), the Next Generation Disease Management company whose business is public health(TM), announced today that it has submitted a case report of a sickle cell patient whose pain disappeared with GenoMed's treatment approach, only to recur when it was stopped.

The patient is a middle-aged African American woman who for years required multiple pain pills every day to tolerate the pain of her sickle cell disease. Since beginning GenoMed's trial on Dec. 22, 2005, she experienced no pain until her trial medication ran out on February 6, 2006. Said her physician, who is lead author on the case report, "Prior to this experiment, for over two years, there has not been more than a day, at least during the winter months, when she has not required some Vicodin."

Her pain ceased within a few days of resuming GenoMed's treatment in February. In June, her physician intentionally stopped GenoMed's treatment. Off GenoMed's treatment, the patient's pain recurred within a week. When she again resumed GenoMed's treatment, her pain again stopped within a few days. She has been pain-free on GenoMed's treatment for three months now, since June.

Said Dr. David Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, "Although only a single patient, she satisfied Koch's postulates, which constitute a rigorous clinical test. As long as the patient was using our treatment, her pain was gone. On two occasions, one accidental and one deliberate, our treatment was stopped. On both occasions her pain recurred promptly, only to disappear quickly after treatment was resumed. It doesn't get much more convincing than this."

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "Ever since Max Perutz showed the molecular defect in sickle cell hemoglobin in 1946, for which he won the Nobel Prize, sickle cell disease has been a sober reminder that knowing the molecular cause of a disease is still a far cry from curing it."

Dr. Moskowitz ended by saying, "We're eager to acquire more sickle cell patients to see if what has cured this patient's pain will work for every patient. It's fitting that our potential cure comes during America's Sickle Cell Awareness and Pain Awareness Month."

About GenoMed

GenoMed owns patents pending for the use of already existing, safe blood pressure pills to treat many diseases besides high blood pressure, including sickle cell disease. To enroll in GenoMed's sickle cell disease trial, please contact Dr. Moskowitz at dwmoskowitz@genomed.com .

Source: GenoMed

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To: donpat who wrote (311)9/17/2006 9:42:56 PM
From: Tadsamillionaire
   of 347
 
Bird Flu Fight Will Cost More Than $1.9 Billion, UN Envoy Says

By Jason Gale and Damien Ryan

Sept. 18 (Bloomberg) -- The global effort to fight bird flu and prepare for a threatened pandemic will cost more than the $1.9 billion already pledged, and more support is needed in Indonesia, which is ``seriously affected'' by the virus, a United Nations envoy said.

David Nabarro, the UN's senior coordinator for avian and pandemic flu, said the money promised by donor countries and organizations at a conference in Beijing in January won't be enough to sustain programs aimed at identifying and controlling the virus in poultry, and upgrading laboratories and hospitals.

``We are just at the beginning,'' Nabarro, 57, said yesterday in an interview in Singapore, where he was attending the annual meetings of the Washington-based International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. ``We are going to need to have a pipeline of funding for further work in the next few years both in the animal sector and also in the human sector.''

Human fatalities from the H5N1 avian influenza strain have almost tripled this year, providing more chances for the virus to mutate into a lethal pandemic form. A severe pandemic similar to the one that killed 50 million people in 1918 may cause global economic losses of as much as $2 trillion, Jim Adams, head of the World Bank's avian flu taskforce, told reporters in Singapore yesterday.

The H5N1 virus is known to have infected 246 people in 10 countries, killing 144, since 2003, the World Health Organization said on Sept. 14. Millions could die if it becomes easily transmissible between people, causing a global outbreak.

``We cannot predict how it will happen, and so we encourage communities, governments, and private entities to get prepared for a pandemic that might start anytime,'' Nabarro told reporters in Singapore yesterday.

Virus Hotbed

More than half the 66 fatalities reported this year have occurred in Indonesia, where the virus is reported to have infected at least two people a month during the past year.

Indonesian authorities have intensified efforts to control the virus during the past few months, Nabarro said. ``I am very impressed with the progress that I have seen, but I want to see greater investment not only by government but also by the international community in Indonesia.''

The World Bank is finalizing an agreement with the Indonesian government on a $15 million grant, Adams said. About $1.2 billion of the $1.9 billion promised in January has been committed, he said. At least part of the $700 million that's not yet committed may be directed at programs in Africa.

Representatives of about 100 countries will meet in Mali's capital, Bamako, later this year to discuss funding needs.

Funds for Africa

``There will be on the table a request for some increases in dedicated funds to Africa,'' Adams said in an interview. ``What we will be looking for from Bamako are some incremental commitments from donors, either from unallocated or additional funds, to fund the specific African programs that are going to emerge.''

In Africa, where H5N1 was first reported in Nigeria in February, the virus has spread to Niger, Egypt, Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast and Djibouti.

The continent will require $760 million over the next three years to help prevent avian flu, according to a report released in June by a coalition of international governmental organizations known as the ALive initiative.

Avian flu in Africa could spread rapidly because of insufficient financial and logistical resources, weak veterinary services, lax border controls and government conflicts, the coalition said in its report.

``There is a shortage of funds in some of the countries that really are fighting an uphill struggle to control avian influenza and also to prepare for the pandemic,'' Nabarro said. ``Please make sure that Africa, that Indonesia, and that countries with great needs do manage to access the resources they require.''

bloomberg.com

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From: Tadsamillionaire9/20/2006 5:46:03 PM
   of 347
 
A severe bird flu pandemic among humans could cost the global economy up to $2 trillion, the World Bank said on Sunday, sharply raising earlier estimates.

The comments came as a senior World Health Organization official said the threat from the H5N1 avian flu virus was just as real today as it was six months ago, even if the headlines were not as scary.

Jim Adams, vice-president for East Asia and the Pacific and head of the Bank's avian flu taskforce, said a severe pandemic could cost more than three percent of the global economy's gross national product.

"We estimate this could cost certainly over $1 trillion and perhaps as high as $2 trillion in a worst-case scenario. So the threat, the economic threat, remains real and substantial," he told reporters at the annual IMF-World Bank meetings in Singapore.
timesofindia.indiatimes.com

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From: Tadsamillionaire9/29/2006 4:58:01 PM
   of 347
 
Bird flu deaths hit 52 after man dies in Bandung

Yuli Tri Suwarni, The Jakarta Post, Bandung

A 20-year-old man hospitalized here over the past week for infection with the deadly bird flu virus died Thursday, raising the nationwide death toll to 52, or roughly a third of the total deaths worldwide.

"The virus crushed his lungs and caused the creation of progressive pneumonia which led to breathing problems," Cissy Rachiana Prawira, director of Hasan Sadikin Hospital, said.

The government confirmed the 20-year-old was positive for H5N1 earlier this week. The man's 23-year-old brother died with bird flu symptoms on Sunday just before being admitted to the hospital.

A third sibling, a 15-year-old female, is currently being treated at the same hospital even though she has been declared negative for the virus.

The younger brother was in critical condition since his admittance to the hospital Sunday from Santo Yusuf hospital in Bandung. Although he showed signs of improvement after he was put on a ventilator and administered high doses of Tamiflu, he remained in an unstable condition.



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To: Tadsamillionaire who wrote (314)9/29/2006 4:58:48 PM
From: Tadsamillionaire
   of 347
 
GenoMed: Cure for Sickle Cell Pain
ST. LOUIS, Sept. 11 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- GenoMed (Pink Sheets: GMED), the Next Generation Disease Management company whose business is public health(TM), announced today that it has submitted a case report of a sickle cell patient whose pain disappeared with GenoMed's treatment approach, only to recur when it was stopped.

The patient is a middle-aged African American woman who for years required multiple pain pills every day to tolerate the pain of her sickle cell disease. Since beginning GenoMed's trial on Dec. 22, 2005, she experienced no pain until her trial medication ran out on February 6, 2006. Said her physician, who is lead author on the case report, 'Prior to this experiment, for over two years, there has not been more than a day, at least during the winter months, when she has not required some Vicodin.'

Her pain ceased within a few days of resuming GenoMed's treatment in February. In June, her physician intentionally stopped GenoMed's treatment. Off GenoMed's treatment, the patient's pain recurred within a week. When she again resumed GenoMed's treatment, her pain again stopped within a few days. She has been pain-free on GenoMed's treatment for three months now, since June.

Said Dr. David Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, 'Although only a single patient, she satisfied Koch's postulates, which constitute a rigorous clinical test. As long as the patient was using our treatment, her pain was gone. On two occasions, one accidental and one deliberate, our treatment was stopped. On both occasions her pain recurred promptly, only to disappear quickly after treatment was resumed. It doesn't get much more convincing than this.'

Added Dr. Moskowitz, 'Ever since Max Perutz showed the molecular defect in sickle cell hemoglobin in 1946, for which he won the Nobel Prize, sickle cell disease has been a sober reminder that knowing the molecular cause of a disease is still a far cry from curing it.'

Dr. Moskowitz ended by saying, 'We're eager to acquire more sickle cell patients to see if what has cured this patient's pain will work for every patient. It's fitting that our potential cure comes during America's Sickle Cell Awareness and Pain Awareness Month.'

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From: jmhollen10/10/2006 9:32:22 AM
   of 347
 
Nature Medicine Articles Support GenoMed's Pending Patent on Bird Flu

Contact: David W. Moskowitz MD CEO, GenoMed tel. 314.983.9933 dwmoskowitz@genomed.com


ST. LOUIS—October 10, 2006—GenoMed™ (OTC Pink Sheets GMED), the Next Generation Disease Management company whose business is public health™, announced today that its approach to avian influenza ("bird flu") is now supported by the prestigious journal Nature Medicine.

Click here for Nature Medicine article of September 10, 2006 nature.com
Click here for Nature Medicine article of September 8, 2006 nature.com

Said Dr. David Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, "It has taken the virology community a long time to recognize the lethality of high cytokine levels. We realized it four years ago. Two years ago, we published that our anti-inflammatory approach works for another lethal viral disease, West Nile virus encephalitis."

Dr. Moskowitz continued, "Unfortunately, the current Nature Medicine articles still point to the danger of a high viral load and call for anti-viral drugs. We believe that cytokines kill the patient, not the virus. GenoMed's approach is to convert patients to asymptomatic viral shedders, which is what happens naturally whenever a patient recovers from any viral illness. Our approach should make antiviral drugs unnecessary for the general population. For this reason GenoMed's general viral antidote was included in BioShield II (Section 2151)"

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "At this point, as with the rest of our treatments (Daily Newstown article), the crucial element missing is public awareness. We're reminded every day that if people had only known about us earlier, we could have saved their lives."

About GenoMed

GenoMed owns "use" patents (which are pending) for the use of already existing, safe blood pressure pills to treat many diseases besides high blood pressure, including avian influenza. GenoMed estimates that it can already save 25% of healthcare costs and extend life by 5 years. The company is trying to get the world to realize this sooner rather than later.

.

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To: jmhollen who wrote (316)10/12/2006 2:58:31 PM
From: Tadsamillionaire
   of 347
 
Moskowitz needs a bigger drum! I realize he is the company, but this stuff works!

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