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   Biotech / MedicalGMED - GenoMed Inc.


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From: Tadsamillionaire5/26/2005 8:25:13 PM
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Flu pandemic warnings escalate
By Anita Manning, USA TODAY
Growing concern over a persistent epidemic of bird flu across Asia is leading to urgent calls from international scientists to prepare for a global flu pandemic that could strike, by some estimates, 20% of the world's population. usatoday.com
Subject 52075

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From: Tadsamillionaire5/26/2005 8:31:11 PM
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Avian flu special: Avian flu: Are we ready?
Peter Aldhous1 and Sarah Tomlin2

Peter Aldhous, chief news & features editor.
Sarah Tomlin, commentary editor.

Trouble is brewing in the East. A highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza is endemic in southeast Asia. Many millions of chickens have been culled, but there is a persistent reservoir in domesticated ducks and wild birds. The H5N1 virus isn't going to go away. And each time it emerges, people can be infected.

H5N1 first reared its head in Hong Kong and southern China in 1997, killing six. Since late 2003, it has led to the deaths of more than 50 people in Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia.

The stage is set for the emergence of a fresh human influenza pandemic. These occur when a virus to which most people have no immunity, usually an avian strain, acquires the ability to transmit readily from person to person. H5N1 hasn't yet gained that ability — and hopefully, it will not.

But if it does, the virus could spread across the globe within months. The consequences are difficult to predict. We're unlikely to be as lucky as in 1968, when the relatively mild H3N2 virus killed some 750,000 people worldwide. But the real nightmare scenario is a re-run of the H1N1 flu pandemic of 1918, which left as many as 40 million dead. Standards of health care have improved a lot since then, which will help. But if a pandemic strain were to retain H5N1's current extreme pathogenicity, a similar toll can't be ruled out.

This week, Nature devotes its News Feature and Commentary pages to a detailed consideration of the risks posed by avian flu, and how well we are prepared to deal with it. In the pages that follow, our reporters examine nations' capacity to produce a vaccine against a pandemic strain, and the adequacy of global stockpiles of antiviral drugs. They do not paint an encouraging picture.

Repeated warnings about the international community's failure to respond to the pandemic threat have fallen on deaf ears. So in our opening News Feature, we use the benefit of fictional hindsight to throw the issues into starker relief, describing a future pandemic through the weblog of a journalist in the thick of things. This is fiction, but not fantasy — the storyline was drawn up in consultation with those who could soon be dealing with the situation for real.

In our extended Commentary section, starting on page 415, experts who are grappling with the issues tackle some hard questions. Which nations are ready, and which are not? David Ho asks if China is in a better position to cope with new microbial threats since the 2003 SARS outbreak. And Anthony Fauci outlines what US researchers are doing to develop vaccines and drugs.

Asian countries are the most immediately vulnerable. Robert Webster and Diane Hulse address the possibility of controlling flu outbreaks in these nations at source, pointing to two examples of successful intervention to wipe out the disease in poultry — in Hong Kong in 1997 and more recently in Thailand. Joining up the dots between animal and human health is also the concern of Albert Osterhaus and his colleagues. They propose a permanent global flu task force to strengthen coordination among agencies on the ground.

If we are fortunate, we may still have the time to take these messages on board. As Michael Osterholm warns in his Commentary, a flu pandemic could bring human tragedy and a global economic catastrophe. Let's hope world leaders heed the warnings.

nature.com

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From: jmhollen6/7/2005 9:33:14 AM
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GenoMed Announces 3rd Year of its West Nile Virus Trial; Now Part of BioShield II

Contact: Paula Hempen, PhD GenoMed, Inc. tel. 314-983-9933
David Moskowitz MD GenoMed, Inc. dwmoskowitz@genomed.com

ST. LOUIS--June 7, 2005--GenoMed Inc.-- ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol: GMED) a St. Louis, Missouri-based Next Generation Disease Management company, announced today that it will be conducting a clinical trial to prevent and treat West Nile virus encephalitis for the third summer in a row. The Company's approach to viral diseases was recently included in BioShield II, the landmark anti-bioterrorism bill recently introduced in the U.S. Senate by Senators Joseph Lieberman (D-CT), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and Sam Brownback (R-KS).

A part of the bill reads:

"CHAPTER 5; REPORT AND ADMINISTRATION. SEC. 2151. REPORT TO CONGRESS. Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in consultation with the Assistant Secretary for Medical Readiness and Response of the Department of Homeland Security and the Director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease of the National Institutes of Health, shall submit a report to Congress that describes alternatives to traditional vaccines and anti-viral therapeutics for viral diseases, including negative immunomodulation compounds that partially suppress a macrophage-dependent innate immune response of an individual to viral pathogens, in order to decrease morbidity and mortality from an excessive immune response."

This language exactly describes GenoMed's patent-pending method to gently suppress the innate immune response in order to treat most viral diseases in the general population.

Said Dr. Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, "Our record in West Nile virus currently stands at 11-3. For best results, we know to use our treatment in patients who aren't immunocompromised, and to begin treatment early."

Physicians in Utah, and Stanislaus County in California, are currently studying GenoMed's WNV protocol for use in their residents.

GenoMed's protocol was also used last summer by bird rescuers, with a 50% success rate. A second trial is planned again for this summer. Owls, hawks, and eagles have been saved using GenoMed's protocol, but so far no crows. This year's goal is to try to save crows, too.

"Horses should also benefit from our approach," Dr. Moskowitz added. "Veterinarians already use non-steroidal drugs to try to reduce the brain inflammation in horses, so our anti-inflammatory approach should make sense to them."

To enroll in GenoMed's trial, which uses already existing, safe medication present in every drug store, just go to www.genomed.com and click on the link for the West Nile virus trial.

About GenoMed

GenoMed has found what it believes to be the "master" disease gene, and has already been able to prevent kidney failure due to diabetes and hypertension in whites, blacks and Hispanics; dramatically delay the progression of terminal emphysema; and begin to see success in treating autoimmune diseases, West Nile virus encephalitis, and cancer. GenoMed has recently found several thousand genes for the top six solid cancers in Caucasians--breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate--and is currently offering its Healthchip(r) for early diagnosis of cancer on a research basis.

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From: jmhollen6/14/2005 2:34:08 PM
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GenoMed to be Awarded Second Patent, for Treating Acute Kidney Failure Without Dialysis

Contact: David Moskowitz MD GenoMed, Inc. tel. 314.983.9933

ST. LOUIS (June 14, 2005) - GenoMed, Inc.-- ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol GMED), a St. Louis, Missouri-based biotechnology and Disease Management company, announced today that the US Patent Office has allowed claims and will be following up with an issued patent shortly on the Company's treatment to treat acute kidney failure with a drug rather than the dialysis machine.

Currently, patients with acute kidney failure are placed on the kidney machine in a hospital until their own kidney function improves. The older a person is, the less likely their kidneys are to recover, and the longer they have to stay on kidney dialysis. Acute kidney failure carries a 50% risk of dying, and involves a much longer and more expensive hospitalization.

GenoMed's treatment makes use of an already existing, generic drug. It has been used in adults, including those with hepatorenal syndrome, and newborns, with over a 70% success rate. A larger trial, for publication, is being planned.

GenoMed's treatment is ideal where access to kidney dialysis is scarce, e.g. after an earthquake, or on the battlefield, or in the Third World. First World countries interested in cutting healthcare costs and improving the atrocious mortality of acute renal failure might also be interested in the company's approach.

About GenoMed

GenoMed is a Next Generation DM™ company that translates knowledge of disease pathways into better patient outcomes so as to lower healthcare costs. GenoMed is currently marketing its patent-pending protocols for preventing chronic kidney failure due to high blood pressure or diabetes, and slowing down emphysema. The Company has recently developed a Healthchip® to predict the six most common cancers in Caucasians: breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate. Testing is available on a research basis.

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From: jmhollen6/16/2005 8:23:46 PM
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GenoMed Treats Its First Presumptive West Nile Virus Patient of 2005

Contact: David Moskowitz MD GenoMed, Inc. tel. 314-983-9933 dwmoskowitz@genomed.com


ST. LOUIS--June 16, 2005--GenoMed Inc.-- ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol: GMED) a St. Louis, Missouri-based Next Generation Disease Management company, announced today that it has successfully treated its first patient this summer with presumed West Nile virus encephalitis.

The patient is a previously healthy 17 year old woman in Philadelphia, PA, whose parents called GenoMed yesterday from her hospital room. Their daughter had been agitated with a fever for three days. Bacterial meningitis had been ruled out by the hospital staff with a spinal tap. Her parents called GenoMed when she became delirious, and could no longer recognize them, despite being on antiviral medications. A family member had found out about GenoMed's clinical trial for West Nile virus on the Internet.

After two doses on GenoMed's protocol, 12 hours apart, the patient's mental state has improved markedly, according to her mother. She could recognize her parents, could tell her mother that she felt hot and thirsty, and has been sleeping quietly.

Said Dr. Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, "This patient's medical team diagnosed viral encephalitis. It will take a week or two to establish whether or not it's West Nile virus encephalitis. But since our treatment approach should work for most viruses, we could initiate treatment empirically. We're extremely gratified that her family turned to us, and even more excited that the patient has responded so quickly, as we've seen in previous summers."

The patient's doctors had told her parents to be prepared for her to remain delirious or in a coma for two to three weeks.

Physicians in Stanislaus County, California are now rushing GenoMed's WNV protocol to the local Institutional Review Board for use in their residents.

To enroll in GenoMed's trial, which uses already existing, safe medication present in every drug store and hospital, just go to www.genomed.com and click on the link for the West Nile virus trial.

About GenoMed

GenoMed has found what it believes to be the "master" disease gene, and has already been able to prevent kidney failure due to diabetes and hypertension in whites, blacks and Hispanics; dramatically delay the progression of terminal emphysema; and begin to see success in treating autoimmune diseases, West Nile virus encephalitis, and cancer. GenoMed's broad-spectrum anti-viral approach was specifically mentioned in BioShield II, recently introduced in the US Senate. GenoMed has recently found several thousand genes for the top six solid cancers in Caucasians--breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate--and is currently offering its Healthchip(r) for early diagnosis of cancer on a research basis.

.

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From: jmhollen6/21/2005 3:29:39 PM
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GenoMed's Method to Prevent Most Kidney Dialysis Featured on IKIDNEY.COM

Contact: David Moskowitz MD GenoMed, Inc. tel. 314-983-9933 dwmoskowitz@genomed.com

ST. LOUIS--June 21, 2005--GenoMed Inc.-- ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol: GMED) a St. Louis, Missouri-based Next Generation Disease Management company, announced today that its method to prevent up to 90% of kidney dialysis was featured in the latest version of NEPHROLOGY Incite, a newsletter for kidney patients at www.IKIDNEY.com.

Dr. David Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, was interviewed about his work on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). Said Dr. Moskowitz, "Using higher than usual doses of certain ACE inhibitors can actually reverse chronic kidney failure. But this approach must be started while a person's serum creatinine is below 2. A normal serum creatinine is less than 1.5. Patients aren't referred to a kidney specialist until their creatinine is close to 3. So it's imperative that patients learn about this before it's too late for them."

The full interview is at:
ikidney.com

About GenoMed

GenoMed has found what it believes to be the "master" disease gene, and has already been able to prevent kidney failure due to diabetes and hypertension in whites, blacks and Hispanics; dramatically delay the progression of terminal emphysema; and begin to see success in treating autoimmune diseases, West Nile virus encephalitis, and cancer. GenoMed's broad-spectrum anti-viral approach was specifically mentioned in BioShield II, recently introduced in the US Senate. GenoMed has recently found several thousand genes for the top six solid cancers in Caucasians--breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate--and is currently offering its Healthchip(r) for early diagnosis of cancer on a research basis.
.

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From: jmhollen6/22/2005 9:48:47 AM
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GenoMed CEO Briefs AFL-CIO on How to Lower Healthcare Costs

Contact: David Moskowitz MD GenoMed, Inc. dwmoskowitz@genomed.com tel. 314-983-9933


ST. LOUIS--(June 22, 2005)--GenoMed Inc. ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol GMED) announced today that its CEO, David Moskowitz MD, was invited to speak yesterday on lowering healthcare costs before the AFL-CIO Healthcare Taskforce at AFL-CIO headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Said Dr. Moskowitz, "Rising healthcare costs has been the number one labor issue for several years. It's possible that GM could reverse its recently announced layoffs if it found a way to lower its healthcare bill. Fortunately, GenoMed's cutting-edge medicine and cheaper drugs can save 10% of healthcare costs immediately and for years to come."

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "This message, I hope, will also be heard by our nation's fifty state Medicaid programs, which are all in the same boat. The solution some states have taken, like Tennessee and my own state of Missouri, is to simply disenroll hundreds of thousands of Medicaid recipients in order to make ends meet. Rather than cutting these people loose to die, I hope state legislators can follow the AFL-CIO's lead and learn about other options to save money. Clearly, we as a society can no longer afford to ignore 21st century preventive molecular medicine."


.

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From: jmhollen6/24/2005 2:52:04 PM
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GenoMed's WNV Treatment Abruptly Stopped, Patient Deteriorates

Contact: David W. Moskowitz MD FACP GenoMed, Inc. Tel. 314.983.9933


PHILADELPHIA, PA.--June 24, 2005--GenoMed (the "Company") (Pink Sheets GMED), a Next Generation DM(tm) company that uses molecular medicine to improve patient outcomes and save healthcare costs, announced today that its first presumed West Nile virus encephalitis patient is doing poorly after GenoMed's treatment was abruptly stopped last week.

The patient received two doses of GenoMed's treatment for WNV on Wednesday and early Thursday morning last week, and appeared to get better according to her mother (see 6/16/05 press release). When she was moved to the Intensive Care Unit for closer monitoring, her new Attending Physician could not be convinced of the usefulness of GenoMed's treatment, and stopped it. She has been without GenoMed's treatment for over a week now.

Said Dr. David Moskowitz, GenoMed's CEO and Chief Medical Officer, "I happened to be in Philadelphia this week for a Disease Management conference, and visited the patient in the ICU on Wednesday evening. She had evidence of decorticate posturing then, constantly shrugging her shoulders inwards. She was unresponsive to pain or verbal stimuli. The situation looked grim."

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "We will never know in this poor patient's case what would have happened if she had just stayed on our treatment. Perhaps she would be exactly as sick as she is now. But it looked like she was getting better, as eleven out of fourteen of our patients have done the past two summers. Now she has full-blown viral encephalitis, and the eventual outcome does not look good. "

The patient's initial serum test for West Nile virus was negative, as is usually the case, so she has not yet been reported to the health authorities. A convalescent serum titer will be drawn in several weeks to see if she has WNV.

ABOUT GENOMED

GenoMed is a Next Generation DM(tm) [Disease Management] company that uses molecular medicine to improve patient outcomes and thus lower healthcare costs. Although the Company has effective treatments, there are obstacles to their adoption, as illustrated by this example. Currently, the company is marketing its protocols for preventing kidney failure from diabetes and high blood pressure, and significantly delaying emphysema.

GenoMed is conducting a free trial for WNV for the third consecutive summer. Those interested in participating are invited to download the trial documents from the Company's home page at www.genomed.com

.

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From: jmhollen6/29/2005 10:00:39 AM
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GenoMed CEO Testifies Before Missouri Medicaid Reform Commission

Contact: David Moskowitz MD FACP GenoMed, Inc. dwmoskowitz@genomed.com tel. 314-983-9933

ST. LOUIS--(June 29, 2005)--GenoMed Inc. ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol GMED) announced today that its CEO, David Moskowitz MD, has been invited to testify today, the first day of public testimony, before the Missouri Medicaid Reform Commission. The Medicaid Reform Commission is a joint committee of the Missouri House and Senate empanelled to study ways to rein in rising healthcare costs for the Missouri state Medicaid program.

As a first attempt, the Missouri Legislature cut 65,000 patients from the state Medicaid program this spring. These patients lose coverage on July 1st, i.e. this Friday. Since oxygen tanks are among the items no longer covered, many patients will soon die.

Said Dr. Moskowitz, "I'm honored to represent GenoMed and the promise of genomics-based medicine at the very first session of public testimony before the Missouri Medicaid Reform Commission. I'm happy to describe the dramatic cost-savings that Next Generation Disease Management can yield, as I did last week for the AFL-CIO Healthcare Taskforce in Washington, DC. My earnest hope is that Missouri legislators will consider adopting our protocols and stop the disenrollments before a single patient has died."

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "The Missouri Legislature is wrestling with the most critical domestic issue of our time. It is literally a life and death issue for tens of millions of Americans. It seems to me profoundly un-American, on the eve of our nation's birthday, to have people die simply because Medicaid is still paying retail for drugs. The best way to control healthcare costs is to control diseases and cut back on hospitalizations. Only genomics-based medicine can do this. And only GenoMed has demonstrated that it can halt cardiovascular diseases including emphysema."

About GenoMed

GenoMed, Inc. is a Next Generation DM(TM) company whose mission is to improve patient outcomes by identifying the molecular pathways that cause disease. DM (Disease Management) is the only healthcare player whose business model is to profit by lowering healthcare costs. A St. Louis Business Journal article (http://www.stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlouis/stories/2002/05/13/story8.html) first reported that the company applied for patents based on its finding that the ACE gene is associated with many common diseases. The company is currently marketing its protocols for preventing kidney failure due to diabetes and high blood pressure, and delaying the progression of emphysema.
.

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From: jmhollen7/13/2005 10:36:22 AM
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GenoMed Joins International Disease Management Alliance

ST. LOUIS--(July 13, 2005)--GenoMed Inc. ("the Company" or "GenoMed") (National Quotation Bureau's Pink Sheets Symbol GMED) announced today that it has joined the International Disease Management Alliance (IDMA) recently organized by Warren E. Todd, the group's founder and Executive Director.


The IDMA (www.dmalliance.org) was formed to promote the concept of Disease Management around the world. As the only healthcare strategy that both improves patient outcomes and reduces healthcare costs, Disease Management has as much appeal globally as it does in the United States.

Said Warren E. Todd, Executive Director for IDMA, "We're delighted to welcome GenoMed to the Alliance and applaud their recognition of the international potential for disease management . Genomics provides a differentiated approach to disease management that should be well received in countries where more physician-centric models of disease management are common."

GenoMed's CEO, David Moskowitz MD, said, "We are thrilled to be one of the first Institutional members of the new IDMA and look forward to supporting the global expansion. Warren Todd is famous as one of the founders of the Disease Management industry in the U.S., and now around the world. We've long believed that our Next Generation DM(tm) business model would resonate especially well with capitated health plans, such as National Health Services in Canada, Europe, Japan, the United Kingdom, and other Commonwealth countries. GenoMed's membership in the IDMA should provide us with an entree to the global healthcare market. Our reliance on the Internet rather than telephone call centers, and our novel physician-oriented business model, give us a global reach immediately."

Added Dr. Moskowitz, "Rising healthcare costs have already reached a crisis point in the U.S. Medicaid programs in many states have begun disenrolling patients to lower costs. Many of these patients will soon die for lack of medications. The best way to control healthcare costs is to control diseases and cut back on hospitalizations. Only genomics-based medicine can do this. And only GenoMed has demonstrated that it can halt cardiovascular diseases including emphysema."

About GenoMed

GenoMed, Inc. is a Next Generation DM(TM) company whose mission is to improve patient outcomes by identifying the molecular pathways that cause disease. A St. Louis Business Journal article (http://www.stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlouis/stories/2002/05/13/story8.html) first reported that the company applied for patents based on its finding that the ACE gene is associated with many common diseases. The company is currently marketing its protocols for preventing kidney failure due to diabetes and high blood pressure, and delaying the progression of emphysema.

Contact:
David Moskowitz MD FACP
GenoMed, Inc.
dwmoskowitz@genomed.com
tel. 314-983-9933
.

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