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   Biotech / MedicalLife Sciences Research, Inc (LSRI)


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To: leigh aulper who started this subject7/31/2002 9:37:06 AM
From: Paul Lee
   of 22
 
LSR Announces Second Quarter Results
BUSINESS WIRE - July 31, 2002 09:30
EAST MILLSTONE, N.J., Jul 31, 2002 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Life Sciences Research, Inc. (OTCBB:LSRI) announced today that revenues for the quarter ended June 30, 2002 were $28.6 million, 19% above the revenues for same period in the prior year of $24.0 million.

The Company reported net income for the quarter ended June 30, 2002 of $2.9 million, compared with a net loss of $1.7 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2001. Net income per share for the quarter ended June 30, 2002 was $0.24 compared with a net loss of $0.28 in the quarter ended June 30, 2001. Net income included non-cash exchange gains on the conversion of the Company's dollar denominated liabilities including bonds into UK sterling of $3.3 million compared to exchange losses in the same period last year of $0.3 million. Excluding that non-cash currency gain, Earnings before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization ("EBITDA") was $3.2 million for the second quarter, or 11.2% of revenues, compared with $1.6 million, or 6.7% of revenues, for the same period in the prior year.

Revenues for the six months ended June 30, 2002 at $54.7 million were 17% above the revenues for the same period in the prior year of $46.7 million. The Company reported a net loss for the six months ended June 30, 2002 of $0.4 million compared with a net loss of $6.0 million in the six months ended June 30, 2001. The loss per share for the six months ended June 30, 2002 was $0.04 compared with a loss of $1.02 in the six months ended June 30, 2001. EBITDA was $3.6 million for the first half of the year, or 6.6% of revenues, compared with $1.3 million, or 2.8% of revenues, for the same period in the prior year.

Brian Cass, LSR's President and Managing Director said "We established a positive momentum during 2001 and this is being sustained as we progress through 2002. Our business has shown excellent improvement on all of our key measurements this quarter, with meaningful growth in revenues, margins, and new orders. Positive cash flow resulted from strong operating results and improvements in working capital. We're enjoying a historic level of backlog, and a market for pre-clinical CRO services that is very buoyant at the moment and looks set to continue."

Andrew Baker, LSR's Chairman and CEO, said "We're proud of the excellent operating results LSR achieved in the quarter, an important step towards the results that have historically been achieved by this Company and others in our industry. We are encouraged by the support we're seeing for both our staff and Company. The record orders and backlog that we've seen in each of the past two quarters are the highest compliment we can be paid by our clients, and we are committed to continue working diligently to retain their confidence and respect. We're also pleased to see growing liquidity in our stock on the US trading markets, further convincing us of the valuable benefits of our new structure."

Life Sciences Research, Inc. is one of the world's leading Contract Research Organizations providing product development services to the pharmaceutical, agrochemical and biotechnology industries. LSR brings leading technology and capability to support its clients in non-clinical safety testing of new compounds in early stage development and assessment. The purpose of this work is to identify risks to humans, animals or the environment resulting from the use or manufacture of a wide range of chemicals which are essential components of LSR's clients' products. The Company's services are designed to meet the regulatory requirements of governments around the world. LSR operates research facilities in the United States (the Princeton Research Center, New Jersey) and the United Kingdom (Huntingdon and Eye, England).

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To: leigh aulper who started this subject11/1/2002 2:50:12 PM
From: Paul Lee
   of 22
 
LSR Announces Third Quarter Results
Friday November 1, 1:52 pm ET

EAST MILLSTONE, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov. 1, 2002--Life Sciences Research, Inc. (OTCBB:LSRI - News) announced today that revenues for the quarter ended September 30, 2002 were $30.0 million, 16.5% above the revenues for the same period in the prior year of $25.7 million.
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The Company reported net income for the quarter ended September 30, 2002 of $1.5 million, compared with $0.1 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2001. Net income per common share for the quarter ended September 30, 2002 was $0.13 compared with $0.09 in the quarter ended September 30, 2001. Net income included non-cash foreign exchange transaction gains on the conversion of the Company's dollar denominated bonds into UK pound sterling of $1.6 million compared to $2.2 million in the same period last year. Excluding the foreign exchange transaction gains, Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization ("EBITDA") was $3.7 million for the third quarter, or 12.3% of revenues, compared with $1.6 million, or 6.4% of revenues, for the same period in the prior year.

Revenues for the nine months ended September 30, 2002 were $84.7 million, which were 16.9% above the revenues for the same period in the prior year of $72.4 million. The Company reported net income for the nine months ended September 30, 2002 of $1.1 million compared with a net loss of $6.0 million in the nine months ended September 30, 2001. Net income per common share for the nine months ended September 30, 2002 was $0.11 compared with a loss of $1.02 in the nine months ended September 30, 2001. Net income included non-cash foreign exchange transactions gains on the conversion of the Company's dollar denominated bonds into UK pound sterling of $3.9 million compared to a $0.8 million foreign exchange transaction loss in the same period last year. Excluding the foreign exchange transaction gain/loss, EBITDA was $7.3 million for the first nine months of the year, or 8.6% of revenues, compared with $3.0 million, or 4.1% of revenues, for the same period in the prior year.

Brian Cass, LSR's President and Managing Director said "Our third quarter operating results reflect continued and meaningful progress on each of our key measures. Top line growth in both the US and the UK has been very solid, both sequentially and compared with last year. Another excellent quarter for new orders means we are now some 20% ahead on a year to date basis resulting in a record backlog of $85 million."

Mr. Cass continued, "We remain focused on operating profits and cash generation, both of which are showing solid progress. Operating profit is the highest level in over five years, and this has driven positive cash flow from operations for the second quarter in a row. Furthermore, we've made significant progress in reducing working capital levels during 2002. These two things together have helped us achieve an increase in our cash position and a decrease in our debt since the beginning of the year."

Andrew Baker, LSR's Chairman and CEO, added "This is an exciting time for LSR, not just because of the improving operating results that Brian and his team are achieving, but also because of the encouraging prospects for our whole industry sector. Our excellent order growth this year is indicative of the strong market demand for drug discovery services which is also reflected in the interest shown by investors in the Contract Research sector. Now that our stock is trading exclusively on the US market we look forward to benefiting from this very positive environment of support and understanding."

Life Sciences Research, Inc. is a global Contract Research Organization providing product development services to the pharmaceutical, agrochemical and biotechnology industries. LSR brings leading technology and capability to support its clients in non-clinical safety testing of new compounds in early stage development and assessment. The purpose of this work is to identify risks to humans, animals or the environment resulting from the use or manufacture of a wide range of chemicals which are essential components of LSR's clients' products. The Company's services are designed to meet the regulatory requirements of governments around the world. LSR operates research facilities in the United States (the Princeton Research Center, New Jersey) and the United Kingdom (Huntingdon and Eye, England).

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From: leigh aulper1/31/2005 9:19:31 AM
   of 22
 
Animal Rights Group Aims at Enemy's Allies
Harassment Campaign Targets Suppliers, Customers of Product Testing Company
By Glenn Frankel
Washington Post Foreign Service
Monday, January 31, 2005; Page A16

HUNTINGDON, England -- Greg Avery was a small-time activist on the fringes of the animal rights movement here when, one day in 1999, he trailed a truck full of cats from a breeding farm to its destination: the gates of Huntingdon Life Sciences, Britain's largest animal research laboratory.

Suddenly, he recalls, it came to him: Why focus on one little cat farm when you could declare war on a major publicly traded company that experiments on thousands of animals each year?

Over the next five years, the Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty campaign, known as SHAC, brought Huntingdon to the edge of bankruptcy and forced the company to cease trading on the London Stock Exchange and move its corporate headquarters to New Jersey. Activists with clubs assaulted two of its senior executives, while dozens of other employees reported harassment ranging from damage to their property to threatening phone calls and false allegations of pedophilia.

The campaign spread to the United States, where a federal grand jury in Newark last May indicted SHAC USA and seven individuals on charges that included violation of the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act. The trial is scheduled for June.

The campaign against Huntingdon -- a company with 1,400 employees and $120 million in annual sales -- is the longest, most aggressive and most ambitious that the militant wing of the animal rights movement has ever conducted. It marks an escalation in tactics and a new internationalization of the movement, which to a large extent was born and bred in Britain and still follows the lead of British activists.

Proponents of animal testing argue that without it, most of the drugs and modern therapies developed to combat cancer and a host of other diseases would not exist. But animal rights advocates contend that testing is inhumane and largely unreliable. For activists such as Avery, testing is nothing less than mass murder.

The key to strangling Huntingdon, says Avery, has been to focus on harassing its suppliers and customers -- ranging from the bank that lent it money to the caterer who supplied its cafeteria food. "We decided to hit companies who don't need Huntingdon but Huntingdon needs them," he said. "These are banks with tens of millions of pounds -- why risk their reputation for some crappy little company? If they wouldn't make a moral decision, we would force them to make a financial one."

Brian Cass, Huntingdon's managing director, said his company has survived the onslaught and is back on its feet. But Avery, who insists that he and his supporters operate within the law, contends the campaign is well on its way toward driving Huntingdon out of business within the next two years.

Avery, 36, has waged his campaign with just a handful of paid organizers, a few dozen dedicated volunteers and a support system of several thousand sympathizers utilizing a network of cell phones and Web sites. "It's very much a David and Goliath thing," he declared.

But in this war of attrition, it's hard sometimes to tell David from Goliath.

An Obvious Target

On a crisp but sunny autumn Wednesday, Gavin Medd-Hall, 40, an unemployed computer technician, led a band of five protesters on a journey south of London. Over the course of the day, they visited three companies that supply services to Huntingdon or carry out animal research for it on contract. At each stop they unfurled a 10-foot-long vinyl banner with a color photo of a terrified cat strapped down for experimentation.

Outside the local offices of Fujisawa Healthcare Inc., a Japanese drug manufacturer, the protesters pulled out loudspeakers from a backpack and began their harangue. "Five hundred animals are dying every single day in a painful medieval torture chamber," intoned one of them. "You have blood dripping from your hands, Fujisawa, because of your disgusting lust for money and profit."

Huntingdon, which conducts experiments on up to 75,000 rats, mice, guinea pigs, cats, dogs and monkeys every year, is an obvious target. Two hidden-camera investigations in the 1990s uncovered deliberate abuse of animals by staff members in England and the United States. Company officials say that the incidents were isolated and that strong safeguards are in now in place to ensure they don't recur.

Huntingdon operates two labs in England and another in New Jersey that test new drugs, shampoos, food products and industrial chemicals on animals. The company produces toxicology, metabolic and other studies for pharmaceutical companies around the world that by law must conduct such studies before receiving product approval.

The company acknowledges that it kills thousands of animals during its testing, but insists that conditions under which the tests proceed are as humane as possible. An hour-long guided tour of portions of two buildings at the main site here revealed nothing to contradict those claims. Forty beagle puppies in one room were kept in kennel-style conditions. The floors were clean, food and water plentiful and the people in charge expressed affection and concern for the dogs.

Avery said he and each of SHAC's half-dozen full-time employees are paid less than $100 a week. He buys his clothes at a charity shop in London, and he and his family live in a house lent to the movement by a wealthy benefactor. Hundreds of other people donate money or time to the cause, and therein lies its real strength, according to Avery. "They call us extremists," he said. "But 7 million people in this country have cats, and 6 million have dogs. They all identify with animals in the labs."

In the early days of the campaign, Avery was arrested and jailed for threatening the life of a Huntingdon official. SHAC's Web site published the names and home addresses of company employees and urged supporters to harass them. A half-dozen cars of company workers were firebombed. Many of the attacks were carried out in the name of the Animal Liberation Front, an underground movement that has operated sporadically in Britain since the mid-1970s.

Three men in ski masks confronted Cass, the managing director, when he pulled into his driveway one evening in February 2001. They battered him in the head and ribs with pickax handles until a neighbor chased them off. An activist named David Blenkinsop, 38, is serving a three-year sentence for the assault on Cass as well as five years for his part in a firebombing campaign.

Avery insisted that he opposes violence and illegal activity, although he has been convicted four times for activities related to Huntingdon. He, his wife, Natasha Taylor, and his former wife, Heather James, served six months each in 2002 for conspiracy to incite criminal damage after the SHAC Web site published the names and addresses of the Huntingdon employees.

SHAC continues to publish the names, addresses and phone numbers of companies that do business with Huntingdon, although it posts a disclaimer that it "does not encourage illegal actions of any kind against these companies."

After SHAC published the name and address of BOC, a British supplier of gas to Huntingdon, a female employee's property was damaged. A message signed "ALF" was posted on Bite-Back, a Florida-based Web site: "If you don't think it is torture put yourself in that lab for one day. You would not be able to stomach it you sick freaks."

Last month, BOC announced it was severing ties with Huntingdon. A company statement called the move "a commercial decision."

Economic Pressure

A 10-foot-high fence topped by razor wire surrounds the headquarters of Huntingdon Life Sciences, 70 miles north of London, and the front gate is protected by a brick compound.

Cass recalled the time five years ago when demonstrators massed outside the complex every day, shouting abuse and taking down the license plate numbers of employees and suppliers. But the key moment, he said, came when SHAC targeted the company's financial base.

Huntingdon's fund manager, Phillips & Drew, sold its 11 percent stake in February 2000 after its London offices were evacuated following a bomb threat and the disclosure on the SHAC Web site of home phone numbers of the fund's directors.

The Royal Bank of Scotland dropped out a year later, calling in its $35 million loan. And when no other British bank would agree to assume the loan, the Bank of England stepped in to avert bankruptcy. The accounting firm Deloitte and Touche resigned as the company's auditor in February 2003. The company's insurance broker also quit, forcing the government to provide emergency coverage.

Huntingdon eventually found new financing with Stephens Inc., an Arkansas investment bank, and reincorporated in the United States as Life Sciences Research Inc. The American company's share price, which fell to less than $1 in 2002, has risen to more than $11, and it recently reported its 15th consecutive quarter of revenue growth.

"This company is in a lot stronger position today than it was in 2000," said Cass, who remains grimly defiant. On the bulletin board of his office is a photo of him in a SHAC sweat shirt that reads: "Spongers, Hypocrites Anarchists Cowards."

At first, he said, government officials were slow to react. But this past year, police arrested 202 people on charges related to animal rights activism. The government has enacted new laws to establish security zones around businesses and homes targeted by activists, to allow for the prosecution of people colluding in harassment, and to enable executives and boards of directors of targeted companies to keep their identities and addresses confidential.

Officials are acting in part out of concern that SHAC's success is spreading. Earlier this year, activists pressured Cambridge University into scrapping plans to build a primate research center, and a new campaign is seeking to force Oxford University to abandon plans for a new $35 million research laboratory.

Cass said the new laws have made a difference, although he maintains that activists still get away with intimidation. "I'll believe these things have worked when that phone rings and it's a High Street bank saying, 'We'd like you to open an account with us,' " he said.

Just as Huntingdon migrated to the United States, SHAC has followed. Kevin Kjonaas, a student at the University of Minnesota, traveled to England to work with Avery and James in the early days of the campaign. He returned to the United States and founded SHAC USA. Kjonaas is one of seven activists facing federal animal terrorism charges for allegedly conducting and encouraging violence, vandalism and intimidation against Life Sciences, Stephens Inc. and other companies. The activists, who deny the charges, argue that the authorities are violating their right of free expression by branding them as terrorists.

Despite the new pressures, Avery insisted that SHAC will triumph. Its most recent newsletter pledged to move on to demonstrations at British airports to block the importation of lab animals for testing at Huntingdon. "Time to close the gateways to hell," reads the headline, which appears under SHAC's motto: "We never give in and we always win."

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

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From: tayronachan5/4/2005 7:43:07 PM
   of 22
 
earnings look ok. comments? eom

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From: Paul Lee6/14/2005 9:06:10 PM
   of 22
 
LSR Announces Full Repayment of Bank Debt with Proceeds from Sale Leaseback and Internal Cash

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tue Jun 14 16:05:02 2005 EST
EAST MILLSTONE, N.J., Jun 14, 2005 (BUSINESS WIRE) --
Life Sciences Research, Inc. (OTCBB: LSRI) announced
today that it paid in full its outstanding bank indebtedness of GBP
22.6 million (approximately $41.3 million) using the proceeds from the
sale-leaseback of its three operating facilities and cash on hand.
The sale-leaseback was entered into with Alconbury Estates, an
investment company controlled by Andrew Baker, the Company's Chairman
and CEO. The purchase price for the three facilities was $40 million,
consisting of $30 million cash at closing and a five year $10 million
variable rate subordinated promissory note, which Alconbury has agreed
to make a best effort to repay within twelve months. The Company has
entered into corresponding leases for those facilities for 30 years,
with 2 five-year options, with rentals commencing at $1.8 million per
year for the New Jersey facility and GBP 1.7 million ($3.1 million)
for the two U.K. facilities. Net costs to the Company associated with
this transaction were approximately $1 million. Costs incurred by
Alconbury were approximately $4.5 million, which was paid by the
Company, but will be repaid by Alconbury as agreed.
Brian Cass, LSR's President and Managing Director said, "As we
have stated in our public filings since 2001, we have long seen the
benefits of leveraging our real estate assets for long term financing,
as well as to better position the Company for future growth. This
transaction, which was made possible by the efforts and commitment of
the Company's Chairman, achieved important strategic objectives for
the Company. We have fully repaid our bank debt which was coming due
in one year and have effectively provided secure long term financing
in exchange for paying rent. Moreover, we have done so while ensuring
the continued availability of our core operating facilities to the
Company for the foreseeable future. This structure could also be
considered as a financing mechanism for possible facility expansion
for our Company should we so desire in the future."
In accordance with the provisions of FASB Interpretation No. 46R
(FIN 46), the Company will reflect the consolidation of Alconbury
Estates into its accounts until such time as the $10 million
subordinated note has been repaid. Although a significant ongoing
impact of that consolidation will be eliminated by the minority
interest entries associated with this transaction, it will mean that
the Company will not record the gain and loss associated with the sale
of the properties, nor recognize the associated decrease in
depreciation, until FIN 46 consolidation accounting no longer applies.
At that time, the Company will record a non-cash loss of approximately
$44 million for the sale of the UK properties, and a gain of
approximately $6 million, amortized over the term of the lease, for
the US property. In addition, the Company anticipates a reduction in
its annual depreciation charge of approximately $3.5 million.

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From: andy575710/10/2005 1:08:12 PM
   of 22
 
NYSE listing; will co get listing it was promised?

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From: Paul Lee2/9/2006 12:27:08 AM
   of 22
 
LSRI drops to Pink Sheets amid animal rights action
Wed Feb 8, 2006 7:39 PM ET
By Bill Berkrot

NEW YORK, Feb 8 (Reuters) - Embattled animal testing lab Life Sciences Research Inc.(LSRI.PK: Quote, Profile, Research), target of an intensive protest campaign by animal rights activists, was forced to start trading shares on the Pink Sheets this week, five months after it expected to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

"Delisting them to the Pink Sheets is not enough, so we are now moving into next stage of the campaign, which is getting them delisted from the Pink Sheets," Camille Hankins, co-founder of New York-based Win Animal Rights (WAR), said on Wednesday.

"The prize is to close down LSRI and stop that killing."

Life Sciences officials could not immediately be reached for comment.

The company, which does animal research for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, was set to join the Big Board in September, when the NYSE suddenly and without explanation pulled the plug on the listing.

A month later, the company was still hoping to join the NYSE as promised.

But the campaign of intimidation and threats by animal rights activists led to the resignation of the company's primary market maker, Legacy Trading, and Life Sciences Research suffered the indignity of being dropped to trading on the Pink Sheets.

A Pink Sheets official, informed of WAR's aim to get the company delisted from the Pink Sheets, said there was nothing he could do about it.

"We are not a regulator," said the official, who asked that his name not be used.

He said the only way a company can be removed from the Pink Sheets was if the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suspends trading or if brokers were to stop trading the company's shares.

Hankins said her group would continue its picketing protests against the company on almost a daily basis. The group, which accuses LSRI of profiting by the suffering and killing of animals, also plans to make executives of biotech companies attending a major conference in New York next week walk a gauntlet of protesters.

WAR activists have also threatened to step up their campaign by staging protests at the offices and homes of executives of Life Sciences' major investors and customers, including drug makers Pfizer Inc. (PFE.N: Quote, Profile, Research), GlaxoSmithKline Plc (GSK.L: Quote, Profile, Research), Novartis AG (NOVN.VX: Quote, Profile, Research) and Roche Holding AG (ROG.VX: Quote, Profile, Research).

Previous protests have taken place at the homes of LSRI's investors and market makers.

Another animal rights group, the Animal Liberation Front, claimed responsibility for spray-painting slogans across the walls of two New York-area yacht clubs frequented by employees of a Wall Street firm that was going to trade shares of Life Sciences. The firm then changed its mind.

Before the planned NYSE listing, contact information for hundreds of NYSE employees appeared on the Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty Web site (www.shac.net).

Life Sciences is the parent of British-based Huntingdon Life Sciences, which has long been a target of U.K. animal rights activists.

LSRI shares closed down 10 cents at $11.30 on Wednesday. Shares were trading for about $18 on the Nasdaq Bulletin Board in September.

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From: leigh aulper3/7/2006 10:00:00 AM
   of 22
 
Animal activists are guilty of incitement
First conviction under '92 federal law
Friday, March 03, 2006
By JOHN P. MARTIN and BRIAN T. MURRAY
Newhouse News Service
TRENTON -- In a case closely monitored by social activists and the industries they target, six animal-rights supporters were convicted yesterday of conspiring to harass, threaten and stalk associates of a New Jersey research laboratory.

The verdict by a federal jury marked a government victory in a trial that was as much a test of the limits of activism as it was a measure of criminal evidence.

The defendants were young adults who prosecutors said used the Internet to organize and incite a nationwide terror campaign against individuals doing business with or for Huntingdon Life Sciences, a firm that uses animals to test products for pharmaceutical companies.


Throughout the country, targets reported being stalked by bullhorn-wielding protesters in their neighborhoods or communities, receiving ominous phone calls, finding messages such as "Puppy Killer" painted on their driveways or seeing anonymous online postings of the names, ages and schools of their children.

The defendants, which also included their umbrella group, Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty Inc., portrayed the charges as an infringement of their right to assemble and exercise free speech. And they contended there was no proof linking them to a crime.

But in their third day of deliberations, the panel of seven men and five women disagreed.

Convicted of conspiracy to commit animal enterprise terrorism and interstate stalking were Joshua Harper of Seattle, Andrew Stepanian of Huntington, N.Y., and Lauren Gazzola, Jacob Conroy and Kevin Kjonaas, who lived together in Pinole, Calif. A sixth defendant, Darius Fullmer of Hamilton, was found guilty only on the conspiracy charge.

In one corner of a courtroom packed with supporters, an audible gasp went up as the verdicts were read. Gazzola began crying; the other defendants shook their heads.

Acting on a request from prosecutors, Senior U.S. District Judge Anne Thompson immediately jailed all the defendants except Fullmer, though she agreed to consider bail. Most face at least three years in prison.

U.S. Attorney Christopher Christie hailed the verdict as one of national significance. "There is no place in a democratic, law-abiding society for extremists who incite or use violence and intimidation as a means to an end," he said.

The defendants and their lawyers declined to comment.

Pamela Ferdin, the group's new president, said she could not discuss the case but still pressed her cause with reporters: "I feel sorry for the animals right now being abused and tortured inside Huntingdon Life Sciences," she said. "Those animals get life without parole."

The activists were the first to be tried under the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, a rarely used 1992 statute Congress enhanced in recent years after concerns from the pharmaceutical industry.



One industry trade group praised the verdict yesterday, as did Huntingdon Life Sciences.

"The government and this jury have sent a strong message to those who would ignore the democratic process and resort to criminal activity to advance their political views," said Mike Caulfield, Huntingdon's general manager.

One of Europe's largest testing companies, Huntingdon, based in Great Britain, uses tens of thousands of rats, fish, monkeys and dogs each year to conduct federally mandated safety tests for drug makers and other clients at labs in England and Franklin Township, Somerset County. The animals are typically destroyed after the testing.

SHAC, as the animal rights group is known, launched its campaign after an activist took a job at a Huntingdon lab in England and secretly filmed footage of lab animals being beaten, deformed or otherwise abused.

Prosecutors in the case acknowledged they had no proof any of the defendants committed acts of terrorism, but they said Gazzola, Conroy and Kjonaas -- who once lived together in a house near the New Jersey lab -- controlled the group's Web site, organized the U.S. campaign and trumpeted harassment by others.

After the verdicts, the lead prosecutor, Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney Charles McKenna asked the judge to order the group to purge names and personal data from the Web site.

During the trial, demonstrators held occasional peaceful rallies outside the federal courthouse, touting photos of caged animals and chanting slogans at passers-by. U.S. marshals added extra security at the courthouse, and the judge sealed the jurors' names from the public record.

Since their indictment in 2004, the defendants, most in their 20s, have become minor celebrities in activist circles. They banded together as "The SHAC 7," giving speeches and headlining fund-raisers.

Yesterday evening, they were led off together in handcuffs.

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From: Paul Lee12/22/2006 7:49:35 AM
   of 22
 
LSR to Commence Trading on NYSE Arca
Friday December 22, 3:30 am ET

EAST MILLSTONE, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Life Sciences Research, Inc. (Other OTC: LSRI - News) announced today that its listing application has been approved by NYSE Arca. Trading is expected to begin this morning under the new ticker symbol "LSR".


NYSE Arca, the first U.S. open all-electronic stock exchange, provides customers with fast electronic execution and open, direct and anonymous market access.

In connection with LSR's listing and trading on NYSE Arca, LSR and NYSE Group, Inc. have entered into a settlement agreement and release under which LSR will release the NYSE from all claims relating to the September 2005 postponement by the NYSE of LSR's trading on the NYSE.

Life Sciences Research is a global contract research organization providing product development services to the pharmaceutical, agrochemical and biotechnology industries. LSR brings leading technology and capability to support its clients in non-clinical safety testing of new compounds in early stage development and assessment. The purpose of this work is to identify risks to humans, animals or the environment resulting from the use or manufacture of a wide range of chemicals which are essential components of LSR's clients' products. The Company's services are designed to meet the regulatory requirements of governments around the world. LSR operates research facilities in the United States (the Princeton Research Center, New Jersey) and the United Kingdom (Huntingdon and Eye, England).

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From: Paul Lee5/2/2007 11:05:56 AM
   of 22
 
Police quiz animal activists after raidsMay 2 2007




A TOTAL of 32 people are being questioned by detectives after raids targeting animal rights extremists including one in Worcestershire.

Police have also seized £100,000 in cash, mobile telephones, computer equipment and documents during the operation which involved 700 officers and has been described as the largest of its kind.

A total of 32 people - 15 men and 17 women - aged between 19 and 68, were arrested in the 30 raids targeting animal rights extremists carried out today across the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands.

An arrest warrant was carried out in Boat Lane, Evesham, but no-one was detained.

In Lancashire, a 51-year-old man and a 59-year-old woman were arrested in Lytham Road, Ashton-on-Ribble; and in Merseyside, a woman was arrested at Freshfields Animal Rescue Centre, East Lane, Ince, Blundell, Liverpool.

In Brynmair, Aberdare, south Wales, a 20-year-old man and a 19-year-old woman were arrested

Financial investigators from the City of London Police Economic Crime Unit are assisting in relation to the quantities of cash recovered.

The raids were the culmination of a two-year investigation into an alleged conspiracy of extremism targeting a variety of organisations and individuals, including Huntingdon Life Sciences in Cambridgeshire, police said.

Officers executed warrants to enter and search premises in Berkshire, Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex, Kent, Glasgow, Greater London, Merseyside, Worcestershire, Lancashire, Northumbria, Yorkshire, South Wales, Belgium and the Netherlands.

Huntingdon Life Sciences has long been a focus both of peaceful demonstrations and more extreme tactics.

A spokesman for Huntingdon Life Sciences said: "It is great to see the results of police investigations from over the past two years beginning to control the activities of animal rights extremists in the UK

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