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   PastimesThe California Energy Crisis - Information & Forum


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To: deepenergyfella who started this subject2/4/2001 5:20:13 PM
From: deepenergyfella
   of 1715
 
If California dot.coms continue to run out of a reliable power supply, then investors might use sites like this one to get the scoop on how it is impacting the various companies.

So I'm adding GOTO and INSP to my watch list because in 6 months time I can see people would have good reason to visit the site, or even subscribe because the portal has so much relevant business and stock information on the California companies.

def

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To: deepenergyfella who wrote (25)2/6/2001 1:06:17 AM
From: Angler
   of 1715
 
DPnNRGfella:

I will watch GOTO and INSP for a while; they're cheap enough for a shot.

However, I still think the best pure power plant play is CPN. They've got plants that will fit in anywhere just like the little imported compacts and subcompacts that turned the business of Detroit around during the aftermath of the Arab fuel crisis in '74.

Small is beautiful to the environmentalists especially since their plants don't burn oil and coal.

Angler

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To: Angler who wrote (26)2/6/2001 8:26:09 PM
From: deepenergyfella
   of 1715
 
Angler, I liked your analogy "...just like the little imported compacts and subcompacts that turned the business of Detroit around"

I agree, and think small power generators will sell well
in the next decade from what I've read.

Off-topic Have you heard of a small company called Capstone? They apparently, make these little miniature gas turbines that are being used at wellsites and for some new hybrid cars. The wellsite ones I can see being a big seller
in next few years or so, rather than running into other types power supply that might not be as reliable.

def

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To: deepenergyfella who wrote (27)2/6/2001 10:54:46 PM
From: Angler
   of 1715
 
Capstone? No, it's a new one on me. I'll check it out.

Angler

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To: deepenergyfella who started this subject2/7/2001 9:08:57 PM
From: deepenergyfella
   of 1715
 
Just my luck...INSP was in my 'watch list' instead of my
'real' portfolio and today it surges 37%.

def

"InfoSpace surges on promise of "improved" outlook
SEATTLE, Feb 7 (Reuters) - InfoSpace Inc. (NASDAQ:INSP) shares surged nearly 37 percent on Wednesday after the supplier of content and tools for Web sites and wireless services said it would detail an "improved" financial outlook next week.

InfoSpace stock rose $1-11/32 to $5 in Nasdaq trading, a day after it hit a year low of $3-1/2, but still far below its 52-week high of $138-1/2."

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To: deepenergyfella who wrote (24)2/8/2001 2:50:04 PM
From: Don Knowlton
   of 1715
 
The Republicans are trying to put pressure on Gray Davis. See the petition at this link:
Web Site: saveourpower.com

Also, on the radio news last night there was a report that state senators in Davis's own party are demanding that he reveal his "plan" in a written document. They seem to be afraid that he does not have one.

The SJ Mercury reports this morning that many critics are complaining that in the last 20 days he has secretly spent almost $1 billion of taxpayer money for spot market electricity with no accountability or reporting.

Maybe there is not really a leader at the state level who can get California out of the mess created by the state government.

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To: Don Knowlton who wrote (30)2/10/2001 8:38:47 PM
From: Angler
   of 1715
 
Sounds to me like "deals" are being made behind closed doors.

I hope not.

I think Senator Feinstein had it right. We're just going to have to get used to paying more for energy in the short run. If they mask it somehow to keep consumers' bills down and then have a balloon payment in later years, we'll be worse off than ever. For one thing cheap rates encourage more waste and less conservation.

Better to bite the bullet now.

Angler

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To: deepenergyfella who started this subject2/11/2001 11:51:21 AM
From: deepenergyfella
   of 1715
 
These $30 Million in bonuses are a pretty decent incentive...for just a 'peaker' plant. Does anyone know of any companies that build them?

Friday February 9 6:04 AM ET
Calif. Races To Open More Plants
By JENNIFER COLEMAN, Associated Press Writer

...The governor's latest plan is designed to add 5,000 megawatts - enough to power 5 million homes - to California's power grid by summer by cutting down on paperwork and streamlining the approval process for small natural gas or renewable-fuel power plants that would run only during peak hours. Plants online by summer would be eligible for $30 million in bonuses...

...Davis asked President Bush (news - web sites) to direct federal agencies to issue permits for small plants within the same time frame. The White House said it is reviewing the request...

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To: sea_biscuit who wrote (18)2/11/2001 2:57:48 PM
From: James R. Barrett
   of 1715
 
The solution is simple.

Nuclear Power Plants.
Nuclear Power Plants.
Nuclear Power Plants.
Nuclear Power Plants.
Nuclear Power Plants.
Nuclear Power Plants.

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To: deepenergyfella who started this subject2/13/2001 9:28:21 PM
From: deepenergyfella
   of 1715
 
Increased threat of outages in Calif
Tuesday, 13 February 2001 20:12 (ET)

Increased threat of outages in Calif
By HIL ANDERSON, UPI Chief Energy Correspondent

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 13 (UPI) -- Cold weather across the West pushed California even closer to the brink of rolling blackouts Tuesday and prompted the release of more water from the hydroelectric dams along the
Columbia River.

California power officials issued a plea for increased electricity conservation due to a higher level of generators being off-line due to mechanical problems, and warned that rolling blackouts appeared likely in
Northern California as the evening peak demand period approached.

"When we have a cold snap, we can definitely see demand rise," said Patrick Dorrinson, spokesman for the California Independent System Operator. "When it's stormy and dark all day, you probably are going to be using more
lights."

Dorrinson said that the agency was hurriedly trying to nail down enough power to meet the expected peak demand of 31,340 megawatts and that there was cautious optimism that additional supplies plus increased conservation
would allow the state to make it through the day. Pacific Gas & Electric Company, however, was contacted earlier in the day to see if any of their major commercial customers would be willing to cut their power use.

"We would be imprudent if we hadn't," said Dorrinson, who stressed that it would not be known very far in advance if the outages would be needed.

"We are primarily trying to avert blackouts," he stated.

The agency, which oversees most of the state's power grid, was getting some 3,000 megawatts of electricity from the Pacific Northwest where electricity supplies have been dwindling.

The Bonneville Power Administration announced Tuesday it was increasing the volume of water flowing through its hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River. While boosting the flow helps meet cold-weather demand, it also means
more water will not be available to help the spring salmon run on the river, a fact that concerns environmentalists and Native Americans who have been pushing for government to step in and preserve the salmon breeding patterns.

"We are seeking to appropriately balance the needs of fish and electricity consumers during a serious drought," said Steve Wright, acting BPA administrator. "Even so, we have employed every means available to minimize deviations from salmon guidelines this year and will continue to do so."

The use of BPA resources at a time when California is importing about 3,000 megawatts per day from the Northwest has been a sore point among lawmakers and residents who feel they are being asked to sacrifice their own
needs in order to keep the lights on in California.

Washington Gov. Gary Locke told representatives of his state's rural electricity co-ops Tuesday that their organizations should continue to get first crack at BPA power supplies.

Locke also chastised the Bush administration for its refusal to institute a cap on wholesale electricity prices in the entire West.

"Unfortunately, the administration has made it clear that it does not believe that strong action is necessary," Locke opined. "That is unfortunate, because I can tell you, the administration's policy of inaction is simply not working -- and our businesses suffer, our citizens suffer and
our economy suffers."
--
Copyright 2001 by United Press International.
All rights reserved.

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