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   PastimesArchaeology


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From: TimF5/28/2020 9:47:29 PM
2 Recommendations   of 6356
 
Scientists discover that four “blank” Dead Sea Scrolls actually have text
The text appears to relate to the Book of Ezekiel.
arstechnica.com

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From: TimF5/28/2020 9:48:12 PM
5 Recommendations   of 6356
 
Archaeologists in Norway are about to dig up a Viking ship
The Gjellestad ship is roughly 1,200 years old.
arstechnica.com

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From: Brumar896/10/2020 12:45:55 PM
1 Recommendation   of 6356
 
Jews and Arabs Descended from Canaanites DNA analysis, from bodies found at several sites, explains more than half of ancestry

Jonathan Laden June 10, 2020

After examining the DNA of 93 bodies recovered from archaeological sites around the southern Levant, the land of Canaan in the Bible, researchers have concluded that modern populations of the region are descendants of the ancient Canaanites. Most modern Jewish groups and the Arabic-speaking groups from the region show at least half of their ancestry as Canaanite.

In the study, published in Cell, the researchers explain that they used existing DNA analysis of 20 individuals, from sites in Israel and Lebanon, and then added 73 more, taking DNA from the bones of individuals found at Tel Megiddo, Tel Abel Beth Maacah and Tel Hazor (Northern Israel), Yehud (central Israel) and Baq’ah (central Jordan). By first eliminating individuals closely related to other individuals in the sample, then comparing the remaining 62 DNA samples against a dataset of 1,663 modern individuals, they were able to establish the genetic link to the modern populations. The ethnic groups either still living where Canaan once dominated, or from that area prior to moving elsewhere, are largely descended from the Canaanites.

Canaanite relief in basat depicting a lion and a lioness at play, 14th century BC, from Beit She’an, Israel Museum, Jerusalem (Wikimedia commons)

Canaanite culture was dominant in the Southern Levant during the Bronze Age (3,500-1,200 B.C.E.) As Iron Age I began, the Canaanite city-states faded. The Israelites self-identified as a separate group. As Volkmar Fritz speculates in Israelites and Canaanites, the Israelites may have formed distinct living arrangements, establishing small villages on peripheral land not previously settled and living mostly in four-room houses. Ultimately, the Israelites formed the states of Israel and Judah, while other biblical states, Ammon, Moab, Aram-Damascus, and Phoenician city-states, emerged. Today, the region consists of Israel, Lebanon, Jordan, the Palestinian Authority, and southwest Syria.

The study in Cell not only establishes that the ancient Israelites were descended from the Canaanites, but also establishes that the Canaanite people across the separate city-states of the southern Levant, and over a period of 1,500 years, were a genetically cohesive people.

biblicalarchaeology.org

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To: Brumar89 who wrote (6320)6/10/2020 3:19:09 PM
From: Valuepro
   of 6356
 
Interesting, but is not this what was thought of Semitic peoples anyway, or is that too broad a class? Thanks in advance if you can comment.

VP

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To: Brumar89 who wrote (6320)6/10/2020 4:13:43 PM
From: Stan
   of 6356
 
That would not be inconsistent with the Biblical record WRT the Israelites because Judges chapter 3:5-6 records this: "The sons of Israel (AKA Jacob) lived among the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites; and they took their daughters for themselves as wives, and gave their own daughters to their sons, and served their gods."

However, I would say that that article is not the full story because not all the Israelites (without exclusion) would have done that.

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To: Stan who wrote (6322)6/10/2020 4:18:37 PM
From: DMaA
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Using genetic records to recreate migratory patterns has some utility but it is very complex and easily misinterpreted.

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To: Stan who wrote (6322)6/10/2020 5:55:43 PM
From: Brumar89
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Most modern Jewish groups and the Arabic-speaking groups from the region show at least half of their ancestry as Canaanite.

For the larger picture, "at least half of their ancestry as Canaanite" is close enough imo.

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To: Valuepro who wrote (6321)6/10/2020 5:57:19 PM
From: Brumar89
   of 6356
 
Semitic peoples would be a much larger class, I think, and would include peoples outside the region.

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To: Brumar89 who wrote (6325)6/10/2020 7:48:28 PM
From: Valuepro
   of 6356
 
Yes, in looking deeper into the subject I see that "Semitic" - in modern times - refers to people who share the same roots for their languages. That takes in a lot of geography. More commonly, it mistakenly refers to Jewish people alone.

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To: Valuepro who wrote (6326)6/11/2020 10:30:43 AM
From: DMaA
   of 6356
 
refers to people who share the same roots for their languages.

Just like "Indo-European" refers to people who share a family of languages. Who may or may not be genetically closely related.

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