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   Technology StocksWestern Digital (WDC)


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From: Eric L7/26/2016 9:34:36 AM
   of 11057
 
Western Digital announces next-gen 64 Layer 3D NAND

>> Western Digital Announces World’s First 64 Layer 3D NAND Technology

256 Gigabit 3-Bits-Per-Cell Chip is the Smallest in the Industry

Western Digital Press Release
Irvine, California
July 26, 2016

businesswire.com

Western Digital Corp. (NASDAQ: WDC) today announced that it has successfully developed its next generation 3D NAND technology, BiCS3, with 64 layers of vertical storage capability. Pilot production of the new technology has commenced in the Yokkaichi, Japan joint venture facilities and initial output is expected later this year. Western Digital expects meaningful commercial volumes of BiCS3 in the first half of calendar 2017.

“The launch of the next generation 3D NAND technology based on our industry-leading 64 layer architecture reinforces our leadership in NAND flash technology,” said Dr. Siva Sivaram, executive vice president, memory technology, Western Digital. “BiCS3 will feature the use of 3-bits-per-cell technology along with advances in high aspect ratio semiconductor processing to deliver higher capacity, superior performance and reliability at an attractive cost. Together with BiCS2, our 3D NAND portfolio has broadened significantly, enhancing our ability to address a full spectrum of customer applications in retail, mobile and data center.”

BiCS3, which has been developed jointly with Western Digital’s technology and manufacturing partner Toshiba, will be initially deployed in 256 gigabit capacity and will be available in a range of capacities up to half a terabit on a single chip. Western Digital expects volume shipments of BiCS3 for the retail market in the fourth calendar quarter of 2016 and to begin OEM sampling this quarter. Shipments of the company’s previous generation 3D NAND technology, BiCS2, continue to customers in retail and OEM. ###

- Eric L. -

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From: Eric L7/26/2016 2:51:32 PM
   of 11057
 
Western Digital SSD Acquisitions ...

... including SanDisk who also made several SSD acquisitions.

Who's who in SSD? - Western Digital

Zsolt Kerekes
StorageSearch.com
June 2016

storagesearch.com

Western Digital's presence in the SSD market has developed by means of 7 successive acquisitions of SSD companies (so far).

I think it is inevitable - given the changes now taking place in the market, WDC's past failures to organically grow its own SSD IP base, and the growing gap which WDC has in the SSD market (particularly in the DIMM wars and NVMe markets) that more SSD companies and technologies will need to be acquired by WDC in the next 2 years.

Until May 2016 WDC's main surrogate and recycler of SSD IP within the enterprise SSD market was its subsidiary HGST. But the acquisition of SanDisk which closed in May 2016 brings with it a bigger quantity and range of SSD product lines and technologies than any of the previous acquisitions which were managed by HGST. I think that the scale of the SanDisk acquisition will mean that readjustments will have to be made about the roles of the various brands now under the control of WDC.

I wouldn't be surprised to see readjustments in the brands, With the stongest candidate in each case being repurposed for big markets such as consumer, enterprise and cloud.

WDC's key SSD acquisitions - from SSD acquisition history

For clarity - Western Digital is shown as the acquiring company below - although in some cases - the acquisitions were done by WDC's SSD surrogate HGST.

In March 2009 - Western Digital entered the SSD market by acquiring SiliconSystems for $65 million in a cash transaction. SiliconSystems was a Top SSD Company in the industrial SSD market. WDC didn't continue the development of the acquired product line into the MLC industrial era.

In March 2011 - Western Digital announced it would acquire HGST for approximately $4.3 billion. Although the primary motive was hard drives - the companies said they would put more resources into SSDs too. The acquisition took a year to complete, and as a result WDC acquired a SAS SSD product line.

In June 2013 - Western Digital announced it had agreed to buy Stec for approximately $340 million. Stec at the time had a market proven but ageing SAS SSD product line and an established market presence in the industrial and military SSD markets. WDC didn't maintain the military and industrial SSD product lines after the acquisition.

In July 2013 - Western Digital announced it had acquired VeloBit (an SSD software company operating in the SSD auto-caching market).

In September 2013 - Western Digital acquired Virident Systems (a leading PCIe SSD company) for approximately $685 million in cash.

In December 2014 - Western Digital acquired Skyera - which at that time - due to its unique big controller architecture - had a commanding lead in rackmount storage capacity density in the petabyte SSD market. WDC almost immediately after the acquisition end of lifed Skyera's product line. And although it is not yet clear where the acquired systems IP will be used - it has many possible applications within cloud focused rackmount systems.

In October 2015 - Western Digital agreed to acquire SanDisk for $19 billion. SanDisk at that time had entered the standard rackmount SSD market and had enterprise SSD product lines in the PCIe SSD market (primarily from Fusion-io), Software (from FlashSoft and other acquisitions) and SAS SSDs (from SMART Storage). SanDisk was also a leading supplier of consumer SSDs and flash memory. # # #





The two preceding tables are from an AnandTech article which is excerpted in the following post linked back to this one.

- Eric E-L -

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To: Eric L who wrote (11050)7/26/2016 4:52:20 PM
From: Eric L
   of 11057
 
Western Digital SanDisk Acquisition Challenges (and Opportunities) ...

"The acquisition of SanDisk by Western Digital not only transforms the latter into a vertically-integrated maker of storage devices and platforms. ... <snip> On paper, Western Digital is now the only company which can build (pretty much) any type of storage device, from a single-chip SSD for tablets to a storage array featuring SSDs and NAND flash. ... <snip> ... The biggest challenge for Western Digital today should be to integrate all of its parts into one company, eliminate redundancies, streamline product lineups, avoid internal competition and keep up the pace of innovation. "

>> Western Digital’s Acquisition of SanDisk Officially Closes

Anton Shilov
AnandTech
May 16, 2016

anandtech.com

<snip> By taking over SanDisk, Western Digital will become one of the world’s largest suppliers of storage devices and solutions, which will be able to address virtually all kinds of storage needs. ... <snip> ... The combined company will control over 40% of the HDD market, around 10% of the SSD market and a substantial chunk of NAND flash supply (together with Toshiba, SanDisk operates the world’s largest NAND flash production complex).

The new entity will also be very powerful financially: last fiscal year Western Digital achieved revenue of $14.6 billion and net income of $1.5 billion (down from $15.1 billion and net income of $1.6 billion a year before), whereas SanDisk’s annual revenue for the 2015 fiscal year was $5.56 billion, a decrease of 16% from 2014. But while the combination of Western Digital and SanDisk has a huge potential, it will not be easy for the two companies to become one, especially keeping in mind that Western Digital and SanDisk have not fully absorbed HGST, Fusion-io and a number of other companies they acquired in the recent years.

Portfolio Overlap: In the coming quarters, Western Digital and SanDisk will have to optimize their product lineups and either integrate or eliminate redundancy projects, two rather tough challenges.

The explosive growth of the solid-state storage market helped to create rather innovative developers of NAND-based storage solutions for enterprises and hyperscale data centers, whereas established players faced a new reality and had to become parts of bigger entities. To strengthen its portfolio of products for the lucrative data center market, SanDisk has acquired Pliant Technology, FlashSoft, Schooner Information Technology, SMART Storage Systems and Fusion-io in the recent years. Because of its multi-billion takeovers, SanDisk greatly expanded its portfolio of products as well as intellectual property. What is important to note is that even now some of SanDisk’s products overlap and address essentially similar market segments.

[see tables in previouys post]

Western Digital was not sitting idle too. In addition to HGST (which currently absorbs the majority of Western Digital’s enterprise NAND-related assets), the company bought Virident, STEC, VeloBit, Amplidata and Skyera. Western Digital is not new in the SSD world: the takeover of SanDisk adds NAND flash manufacturing capacities, something that Western Digital needed to become a vertically integrated provider of HDDs, SSDs and all-flash storage arrays. This means that in addition to Western Digital gaining a lineup of consumer SSDs, it does mean there are a number of overlapping product lines and a lot of staff in similar roles.

A major challenge for Western Digital and SanDisk will be optimization of their workforce in the coming quarters. It can be expected that the two companies may have to lay off a number of people and there are two problems with this. Firstly, takeovers by large corporations are usually followed by brain drain on all levels: both companies have already lost many people from Fusion-io, Skyera, Amplidata and others. The integration of SanDisk into Western Digital could accelerate departures of other people. Secondly, workforce optimizations amid resignations might disrupt product development and execution of roadmaps.

Keeping in mind that Western Digital is now in the midst of HGST integration, the situation becomes even more complicated. Until recently, WD and HGST had separate R&D divisions and product roadmaps. Unification of different research and development operations can have short-term effects on R&D because usual teams and workflows are disrupted and then new ones are yet to be established. Adding SanDisk to the equation essentially makes things even more difficult. But that is not the only challenge.

Product Lineups: The Competition Continues

At present, Western Digital’s subsidiary HGST uses NAND flash memory from Intel (or IMFT/Micron) to make its enterprise-grade SSDs. Keeping in mind that the two companies have a supply and development agreement in place, it is highly likely that development of solid-state drives based on Intel’s 3D NAND is well underway. Moreover, since Intel and Micron seem to pin a lot of hopes on their second-gen 3D NAND (which production starts this summer), it is possible that HGST will have to use this type of memory as well. A good news is that Skyera’s skyHawk FS all-flash storage array should support various types of NAND memory (including SanDisk’s) because Micron, Toshiba and SK Hynix all invested in the company later acquired by Western Digital and Skyera worked with all of them. Meanwhile, HGST’s FlashMax PCIe SSD accelerators (which it got from Virident) rely on Intel’s NAND, whereas S-series SSDs (which the company got from STEC) use Toshiba’s memory.

Since we are talking about enterprise-grade storage, for which development and validation can take years, it is clear that HGST will continue to use third-party NAND for the foreseeable future, unless Western Digital terminates the agreement with Intel, drops already developed products and replaces them with those designed by SanDisk. Even in this case, it will have to sell Intel-based Ultrastar and FlashMax drives for some time so not to upset customers.

Meanwhile, SanDisk naturally uses its own NAND flash as well as its own controllers to make its SSDs for enterprise markets. Such drives compete against products designed by HGST and not all customers of the two companies could easily switch suppliers of SSDs because their storage systems are tailored for particular drives. In short, HGST’s Ultrastar and FlashMax will continue to compete against SanDisk’s Lightning, Optimus and Fusion ioMemory drives/accelerators for quite a while. Moreover, it looks like Western Digital’s skyHawk FS will also compete against SanDisk’s InfiniFlash to a certain degree.

While the integration of the two companies into one seems to be challenging, the addition of SanDisk’s consumer SSDs to Western Digital’s product lineup is a big deal. It is not a secret that PC form-factors that cannot house 2.5” HDDs are gaining popularity, whereas the total available market of HDDs is declining. It is also noteworthy that there is a rather tough competition between low-end SSDs and HDDs for inexpensive notebooks. By offering both SSDs (especially single-chip SSDs like iNAND) and HDDs, Western Digital will be able to address traditional laptops, emerging 2-in-1s, tablets, ultra-thin notebooks and many other new types of PCs. Moreover, with SSDs and HDDs in its portfolio, Western Digital will be able to offer just what PC makers need for low-cost machines (without having to reduce margins to minimal levels just to get a design win). While SSDs will naturally compete against HDDs, this will unlikely hurt Western Digital. On the other hand, entering SSD market and competing against Samsung is a tough challenge, especially with overlapping products, internal competition, redundant workforce and the necessity to align roadmaps of two companies as well as Toshiba.

Impact on Rivals

Two interesting things that we will have to observe in the coming years will be the impact of Western Digital’s acquisition of SanDisk on the market of storage in general as well as on their rivals, namely Intel, Micron, Samsung, Seagate and Toshiba.

While Intel has a broad SSD portfolio, which includes client and server drives, enterprise storage has been Intel’s primary focus from the very start. Development of storage class memory (3D XPoint) as well as its long-term vision of data center architecture indicates that Intel wants a significant and lucrative chunk of the enterprise storage market. Since the company is a major supplier of server CPUs, it is plausible that it will be a main provider of emerging NVDIMM SSDs for the future Intel Xeon platforms. Western Digital (HGST) will remain Intel’s SAS SSD development partner for a while, but Intel does not plan to supply 3D XPoint memory to any other makers of drives at this time, meaning HGST will not be able to address the highest end of the enterprise SSD market with 3D XPoint. However, since both SanDisk and Western Digital have been developing various storage platforms tailored for particular needs (such as HGST’s Active Archive System and Fusion-io’s InfiniFlash), there will be huge parts of the market that the combined company will be able to address without directly competing against Intel. Moreover, SanDisk is developing storage-class memory with HP, which will help to compete against Intel’s 3D XPoint eventually.

Micron was historically focused on the production of DRAM and NAND memory, but in the recent years it accelerated its push into actual products based on their chips. Right now, the company offers a portfolio of SSDs for virtually all market segments, including big data analytics, databases, hyperscale/private data centers as well as virtualized environments. Micron will continue to compete against SanDisk’s SSDs for respective segments and will be able to build hybrid storage solutions when/if needed together with Seagate. What Micron cannot do today is to offer all-flash storage arrays like Western Digital’s Skyera. Moreover, with Western Digital’s takeover of SanDisk, Micron will lose a customer for its NAND flash memory eventually, which is not necessarily a bad thing, given the company’s focus on products and not on commodity chips.

Speaking of Seagate, we should note that the company is facing major challenges. The firm does have state-of-the-art storage technologies, it offers Nytro solid-state storage accelerators, SandForce SSD controllers and various solutions in its arsenal (in fact, the company even claims to havethe world’s fastest SSD in its portfolio). However, Seagate does not have its own NAND flash production (unlike two of its competitors, Toshiba and Western Digital), which is why its chances on the market of consumer SSDs are somewhat limited due to cost reasons and strong competition from Samsung (the only big fabless SSD suppliers are Kingston and LiteOn). Being unable to supply storage products for emerging PC form-factors greatly limits Seagate’s growth potential in general because while HDDs are not going anywhere in the next decade, or even two, their usage in the client PCs is set to decline, and so far sales of high-capacity HDDs for hyper-scale data centers have not offset declines of client hard drives. Recently Seagate announced plans to reduce its own HDD production capacities to improve financial positions, but it remains to be seen how this could help it to guarantee either a steady supply of NAND flash or its own NAND flash production capacities. In any case, Seagate will continue to fiercely compete against Western Digital in the growing market of high-capacity hard drives for cloud data centers and that will impact the third remaining maker of HDDs, Toshiba.

Right now, Toshiba is the only company in the world which sells both SSDs and HDDs, an exclusive advantage it is about to lose. The company does not have helium-filled hard drives in its arsenal to address the most lucrative part of the hyper-scale data center market with 8 TB and 10 TB models. Moreover, unlike its partner SanDisk, Toshiba did not acquire any solid-state storage startups to address the market of all-flash storage systems for data centers. The company still has very advanced SAS and PCIe SSDs in its lineup, hence, it can compete for the market of solid-state accelerators, even though its capabilities are somewhat limited here due to the lack of sophisticated enterprise-grade caching software. While Toshiba has its own NAND flash and HDD production capacities, it yet has to gain technologies (software, hardware, etc.) to better compete for lucrative parts of the storage market. At present, Toshiba is in the midst of a financial scandal and it is hard to expect it to focus on revamping its storage capabilities at this time. However, it remains to be seen what happens next.

SSDs? HDDs? The Industry Needs Solutions!

While client storage technologies are important, enterprise storage will remain the most lucrative segment of the market. The data center today is evolving very quickly and for many applications a dedicated level of multi-tiered storage of HDDs, SSDs or even a combination of them, is still not enough. Don’t get me wrong here: we still need purpose-built hard drives and solid-state drives, but in many new cases they are not installed in general purpose servers but are a part of storage solutions that are designed for particular purposes. Historically, such solutions came from companies like EMC, IBM, HP, Hitachi Data Systems, Netapp and so on. However, in the recent years the market of external storage solutions began to transform.

Firstly, a variety of startup companies has started to sell all-flash storage solutions. These can offer a number of advantages since such firms usually build everything (except flash) in-house and use custom technologies and know what they are doing very well. All-flash arrays, such as SanDisk’s InfiniFlash (512 TB of NAND, 2 million IOPS, 3U form-factor) or Western Digital’s Skyera skyHawk FS (136 TB of NAND, 400K IOPS, 2.4 GB/s, 1U form-factor), provide numerous performance and cost advantages over traditional HDD-based data storage solutions, which is why such all-flash arrays are gaining popularity these days. Furthermore, since they are purpose-built, they deliver performance right out of the box and solve rather complex problems.

Secondly, traditional makers of hard drives in the recent years entered the market of storage systems with Active Archive (HGST), ClusterStor/OneStor (Seagate) and some other HDD-based storage arrays. Such devices are based on high-capacity hard drives and are designed to store massive amounts of data. While sales of many mission-critical storage systems are declining because of all-flash arrays (we see it in the reports of HDD makers as well as industry reports like the one linked above), systems optimized for archive and nearline storage are gaining traction.

To get expertise to develop storage arrays, both Seagate and Western Digital acquired multiple companies in the last few years. However, only Western Digital can now build all-flash storage arrays using its own NAND flash, own controllers and own SSDs. Meanwhile, Seagate will have to rely on SSDs co-developed with third-party providers. A good news is that the company has a long-term development agreement with Micron, but it remains to be seen whether Seagate will be able to offer anything comparable to all-flash arrays from SanDisk or Skyera.

While storage solutions may not be the primary business for Western Digital today, in a world where IT is moving to either private or public clouds, expertise in hybrid-flash and all-flash storage arrays is hard to overestimate. Obviously, the company will need different types of products to address public and private cloud customers. Hypothetically, as one big company with various assets, Western Digital could be able to address everyone with the right products, provided that it manages to smartly integrate SanDisk, HGST and others without losing valuable assets and people en route.

Final Words

The acquisition of SanDisk by Western Digital not only transforms the latter into a vertically-integrated maker of storage devices and platforms, but reflects many industry trends. Client devices transit to flash storage, whereas IT computing is moving to the cloud. To offer the right solutions, Western Digital needed a new set of assets and the takeover brings them to the company.

On paper, Western Digital is now the only company which can build (pretty much) any type of storage device, from a single-chip SSD for tablets to a storage array featuring SSDs and NAND flash. In many ways, Western Digital is now a competitor not only to companies like Seagate, Toshiba, Micron and Samsung, but to EMC, HPE, Intel, Hitachi Data Systems and others. Fighting many wars is a tough business and it remains to be seen how well will it work out for Western Digital.

However, winning market share from EMC or HPE is not the main concern of the company right now. The biggest challenge for Western Digital today should be to integrate all of its parts into one company, eliminate redundancies, streamline product lineups, avoid internal competition and keep up the pace of innovation. ###

- Eric L. -

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From: Eric L7/29/2016 12:44:08 PM
   of 11057
 
FQ4/CQ2 and Fiscal Year 2016 Western Digital Financial Results

>> Western Digital Announces Financial Results for Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2016

Western Digital Press Release
Irvine, Calif.
July 28, 2016

wdc.com

Western Digital Corp. (NASDAQ: WDC) today reported revenue of $3.5 billion and a net loss of $351 million, or $1.34 per share, for its fourth fiscal quarter ended July 1, 2016. On a non-GAAP basis, fourth quarter net income was $208 million, or $0.79 per share. In the year-ago quarter, the company reported revenue of $3.2 billion and net income of $220 million, or $0.94 per share. Non-GAAP net income in the year-ago quarter was $356 million, or $1.51 per share.

The company generated $355 million in cash from operations during the fourth fiscal quarter of 2016, ending with total cash and cash equivalents of $8.2 billion. On May 4, 2016, the company declared a cash dividend of $0.50 per share of its common stock, which was paid to shareholders on July 15, 2016.

For fiscal 2016, the company achieved revenue of $13.0 billion and net income of $257 million, or $1.06 per share, compared to fiscal 2015 revenue of $14.6 billion and net income of $1.5 billion, or $6.18 per share. On a non-GAAP basis, fiscal 2016 net income was $1.2 billion, or $5.09 per share, compared to fiscal 2015 net income of $1.8 billion, or $7.76 per share. The company generated $2.0 billion in cash from operations during the 2016 fiscal year and it returned $524 million in dividends and share repurchases combined.

"Fiscal 2016 was a transformative year for our company and we are pleased by our customers' response to the new Western Digital," said Steve Milligan, chief executive officer. "With the combination of SanDisk and our WD and HGST subsidiaries, we are well-positioned to capture global opportunities through our full portfolio of products for data center, client device and client solution end markets. As we begin a new fiscal year, we remain focused on execution and realizing the benefits of our acquisitions while at the same time creating innovative solutions for the market."

The investment community conference call to discuss these results will be broadcast live at 2 p.m. Pacific/5 p.m. Eastern via webcast today. The live and archived conference call/webcast can be accessed online at investor.wdc.com. A quarterly fact sheet including the company's guidance for the first fiscal quarter 2017 will also be posted on the same website. The telephone replay number is +1 (855) 859-2056 in the U.S. or +1 (404) 537-3406 for international callers. The required passcode is 46180701.

About Western Digital

Western Digital is an industry-leading provider of storage technologies and solutions that enable people to create, leverage, experience and preserve data. The company addresses ever-changing market needs by providing a full portfolio of compelling, high-quality storage solutions with customer-focused innovation, high efficiency, flexibility and speed. Our products are marketed under the HGST, SanDisk and WD brands to OEMs, distributors, resellers, cloud infrastructure providers and consumers. Financial and investor information is available on the company's Investor Relations website at investor.wdc.com ###

• FQ4 and Fiscal 2016 Quarterly Fact Sheet (PDF: investor.wdc.com

• FQ4 2016 Conference Call Remarks (PDF transcript): investor.wdc.com

• Fourth Fiscal Quarter 2016 Conference Call/Webcast: investor.wdc.com

# # #

- Eric L. -

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From: Eric L9/30/2016 10:16:28 AM
1 Recommendation   of 11057
 
Barclays: Western Digital Corp. the new IT Hardware Top Pick (replacing Apple)

Barclays issued a note to investors in which it has replaced Apple Inc (NYSE:AAPL) with Western Digital Corp. (NASDAQ:WDC) as the new IT Hardware Top Pick. ... Analyst noted from a market perspective that PC, server and storage dynamics are better than feared.

>> Barclays Raises PT On Western Digital Corp & Seagate Technology PLC Stock

Ken Bock
TCC | The Countrt Caller
September 30, 2016

thecountrycaller.com

Earlier on Thursday, Barclays issued a note to investors in which it has replaced Apple Inc (NYSE:AAPL) with Western Digital Corp. (NASDAQ:WDC) as the new IT Hardware Top Pick. The firm remained convinced with an Overweight rating on the stock but the raised price target from $61 to $71, reflecting an upside potential of 21.48% over the last close of $58.27. Following the firm’s positive commentary on the stock, WDC shares were trading high in Thursday's trading session.

Mark Moskowitz, Barclays’ analyst commented, “We are again raising our forecasts for what could be a series of upward revisions as a result of both market and company-specific factors over the next 6-12 months.” He noted from a market perspective that server, PC, and storage dynamics are better than expected. Earlier, the market feared these figures to be significantly down.

Based on his analysis, Mr. Moskowitz has raised estimates on Western Digital stock, as well as Seagate Technologies (STX). The firm has raised the price target on STX stock from $36 to $40, reflecting an upside potential of 5.84% over the closing price of $37.79. “From a company perspective, WD is rapidly retiring/refinancing its large debt burden and greater-than-expected margin upside could be on display at the Analyst Day on December 6," commented Mr. Moskowitz.

WDC stock has a 52-week high of $86.93 and a 52-week low of $34.99 with a 48.94 price to earnings ratio. The California based company has a market cap of $16.36 billion. STX stock has a 52-week high of $49.50 and a 52-week low of $18.42 with a 45.86 price to earnings ratio. Seagate has a market cap of $11.27 billion.

According to FactSet data, majority of the analysts rate WDC stock a Buy, 10 rate it a Hold, two rate it an Overweight stock, while one rates it a Sell. For STX stock on the other hand, 22 analysts have a Hold rating, six have a Buy rating, two have an Underweight rating, while one analyst rates it a Sell. ###

- Eric L -

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From: Puru rama10/7/2016 1:25:10 AM
   of 11057
 
The Cheapest Tech Stocks To Invest In for 2017

At the list of cheap tech stocks at the bottom of this article, naturally. But there’s more to cheap tech stocks than just a list of stock symbols. If you’re thinking of investing in tech stocks and want to find the best cheap tech stocks with the greatest potential for big gains, it’s important to see how technology-sector stocks are performing in the grand scheme of things.

Top Cheap Tech Stocks for 2017
* VMware, Inc.
* Infinera Corp.
* Seagate Technology plc

Original Source:http://www.profitconfidential.com/stocks/what-are-the-cheapest-tech-stocks-to-invest-in-for-2017/

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From: Eric L12/6/2016 9:50:16 AM
   of 11057
 
Western Digital Investor Day today ...

Live Webcaat today at 8:30 a.m. Pacific/11:30 a.m. Eastern: investor.wdc.com

"The event presentations will be posted on investor.wdc.com at the conclusion of the event. An archive of the webcast also will be posted later in the day on the same website."

>> Western Digital Investor Day Scheduled For December 6

Western Digital Press Release
Irvine, CA
November 30, 2016

Western Digital Corp. (NASDAQ: WDC), a world leader in storage technologies and solutions, announced today that at its Investor Day on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, executives will discuss topics including the company's ongoing strategic transformation, market positioning, growth opportunities and financial model. The event will feature presentations by the following:

• Steve Milligan, chief executive officer
• Mike Cordano, president and chief operating officer
• Mark Long, chief financial officer and chief strategy officer
• Steve Campbell, executive vice president and chief technology officer
• Dr. Siva Sivaram, executive vice president, Memory Technology
• Manish Bhatia, executive vice president, Silicon Operations

A live video broadcast of the event, including presentations and the subsequent Q&A sessions, will be accessible via webcast on December 6 beginning at 8:30 a.m. Pacific/11:30 a.m. Eastern. Further details regarding the webcast including the URL link will be made available in the next few days on the Investor Relations section of the company's website at investor.wdc.com. The event presentations will be posted on investor.wdc.com at the conclusion of the event. An archive of the webcast also will be posted later in the day on the same website.

- Eric L. -

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From: Eric L6/12/2017 4:30:41 PM
   of 11057
 
The Redesigned Lines of My Passport and My Book Hard Drives ...



businesswire.com

October 11, 2016 08:00 AM

IRVINE, Calif. -- Western Digital Corporation (“Western Digital”) (NASDAQ: WDC), today introduced modern and innovative redesigns of its My Passport®, My Passport for Mac, and My Book® hard drive lines, which have been highly recognized leading sellers for more than a decade. In partnership with fuseproject, an award-winning industrial design and branding firm, the reimagined products were built with the customer in mind. Developed to help make a connection between the device and user, the new drives also include password protection and hardware encryption so customers will love their hard drive as much as they cherish the content stored on it.

As the storage landscape continues to rapidly evolve, and the bars for design and user-experience have increased, the team focused on the design and user experience to catapult My Passport and My Book to the next level,” said Jim Welsh, senior vice president, Content Solutions Business Unit, Western Digital. “Through the reimagined design language, we want to engage consumers in a conversation about how storage is core to their lives and how they feel more empowered by the real benefits of capturing, protecting and enjoying life’s precious memories.”

“The way we use data is changing; it’s becoming much more of a personal commodity, something we value,” says Yves Béhar, founder and Principal Designer at fuseproject. “Western Digital lies at the intersection of our physical life and the digital world, and we wanted to create a quality aesthetic that symbolizes this intersection.”

As part of the reimagined design, the My Passport drives will come in six vivid colors – Black, Yellow, Red, White, Orange and Blue – while still providing reliable portable storage that perfectly complements an on-the-go lifestyle. The My Passport for Mac drive is available in a stylish Black color. The trusted desktop storage device, My Book, combines personal style with a massive amount of storage space, up to 8 TB, so users can keep their photos, videos, music, and documents. Each storage device comes with an automatic backup solution for a seamless, user-friendly process, as well as password protection to keep your precious data safe.

The new WD® products include:

My Passport portable hard drives – trusted and loved portable storage, in a reimagined design, that fits in the palm of your hand

• New attractive design with textured bottom
• Password protection with 256-bit AES hardware encryption
• Automatic backup with included WD Backup™ software
• Up to 4TB capacity

My Passport for Mac drives – your MacBook® computer’s best friend

• New attractive design with textured bottom
• Password protection with 256-bit AES hardware encryption
• Formatted for Mac OS® X and Time Machine® ready for easy backup
• Up to 4TB capacity

My Book desktop hard drive – trusted, high capacity backup for PC and Mac®

• Password protection with hardware encryption
• Automatic backup with included WD Backup software
• Up to 8TB capacity

Pricing and Availability

My Passport and My Passport for Mac portable hard drives are protected by a 2-year¹ limited warranty and are available from wd.com and at select retailers and distributors around the world. My Passport drives have a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) starting at $79.99 USD and the My Passport for Mac drive has a starting MSRP of $79.99 USD.

My Book desktop hard drives are protected by a 2-year² limited warranty and are available from the WD store at wd.com and at select retailers and distributors. My Book drives have a Manufacturer’s
Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) starting at $129.99 USD.

¹,² Both the new My Passport which replaces the My Passport Ultra, and the new redesigned My Book carry 3 year limited warranties not 2 year.

About Western Digital

Western Digital Corporation (NASDAQ: WDC) is an industry-leading provider of storage technologies and solutions that enable people to create, leverage, experience and preserve data. The company addresses ever-changing market needs by providing a full portfolio of compelling, high-quality storage solutions with customer-focused innovation, high efficiency, flexibility and speed. Our products are marketed under the HGST, SanDisk and WD brands to OEMs, distributors, resellers, cloud infrastructure providers and consumers.

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WDC Product Pages ...

Portable External Storage: wdc.com

Desktop External Storage: wdc.com

PC MagMy Book Product Review (February 2017)

pcmag.com

Computer Shopper 8TB My Book Product Review (March 2017)

computershopper.com

- Eric L. -

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From: Checkit1236/13/2017 7:31:15 PM
   of 11057
 
Value of WDC's patents? Im seeing that there is a lot of value in the patents that people own and purchase but is there value in any of WDCs to be acquired solely for this value if nothing else? For example t his patent I was researching by a Californian named Par Chadha is Bias control and method for electro-optic modulators which is defined as a electro-optical modulation system comprising an optical modulator for pulse-modulating an incoming light beam in response to a pulsed RF input signal and to a bias signal and for producing a pulse-modulated optical output which is characterized by a plurality of enveloped pulses, optical detector for producing an electrical signal which is representative of the output from the optical modulator, average detecting device for producing pulse envelope signals which are representative of the envelopes of the pulses, and a bias control circuit, using a plurality of pulse envelop signals, for producing the bias signal as a function of the pulse envelopes.

Any thoughts on this or Chadha's other patents that companies like WDC has?

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