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   Strategies & Market TrendsVoting Machine Companies


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To: levy who wrote (50)1/30/2001 5:10:54 PM
From: Jay Arkay
   of 69
 
Global hitting new 52-week highs
Volume has also been strong on the TSE, nearly 200,000 on Monday, and over 200,000 today (Tuesday). There is a sharp upward trend in the share price, which should only be accentuated by the start of trading of Global on AMEX shortly. It has been accepted for listing on AMEX, but first trade date there is not yet announced--could be next week. With the start of trading on AMEX, increased understanding of this company's unique position and strengths by American investors, and the likely surge in business as counties begin to modernize their election equipment (likely aided by $100s of millions from Congress), Global shares (ASE: GLE) should soar. American investors who can access the TSE or buy in the US under symbol GLELF would be wise to do so prior to the likely run-up following the start of AMEX trading. This is not a flash in the pan or short-term holding; it looks good for great returns over several years. Do your due diligence (www.stockhouse.ca has an active Global forum (TSE: GSM) but don't stop there). Jay

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To: Jay Arkay who wrote (51)1/30/2001 5:23:40 PM
From: Jon Tara
   of 69
 
I was quite pleased with the manner in which Global pursued their AMEX listing. Unless I missed something, they just submitted the application, and kept quiet about it. Good to see a company that avoids the usual hype and nonsense that seems to surround applications for listings.

I bought some GLELF at what I thought was a pretty risky price, of $1.57. This was right after a very significant run, and felt it could have a very significant retracement. It retraced, but not as much as I expected, so glad I did get in when I did.

(And what a pain in the butt buying it - I called TD Waterhouse, thinking they could buy it on the TSE, since they are Canadian-owned brokerage. They fumbled-around for a few minutes, and figured-out that it could be bought on the pinks as GLELF. I took a big breath and had them go ahead and buy at market.)

I don't normally buy low-priced or OTC stocks, but my research led me to this as the only pure-play in election technology. They have significant market-share, and the price (P/E) was right, and I figured some kind of U.S. listing would be forthcoming.

One point of confusion that should be cleared-up in the market shortly is that until this week, I thought this was a Canadian company, and that that might be somewhat of a detrement in the U.S. market, with some "patriotic" forces wanting to buy systems from an American company. But it appears that they are headquarters in W's backyard, in Texas. They are listed on the TSE, and have their annual meeting in Vancouver, so I can see how people can be confused... (LOL, I'm STILL confused - why do they have their annual meeting in Vancouver?) I guess they listed where they could get listed.

I don't think a double within the near term (say, within a month of the listing) is at all unreasonable.

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To: Jon Tara who wrote (52)1/30/2001 7:48:28 PM
From: Jay Arkay
   of 69
 
Global had its origins in Canada, in the Vancouver area where they still maintain some R&D staff and the official headquarters. But yes, you are right, the major operations and real headquarters are in McKinney, Texas, good for that patriotic American flavor. With the AMEX listing and growth in US sales (where most sales have been in recent years), Global could well change its incorporation site to the US. That would make good sense. With the Spectrum acquisition, Global also has operations in the Seattle area, good for high-tech proximity. Note that the AGM two years back was actually held in Texas, to the disappointment of us few Canadian shareholders who attend when it is held in Vancouver. If we get a lot of big American shareholders over the next year, I would not at all begrudge a Texas site for the next AGM. I expect that your pink-sheet speculation will prove to be a very prudent and profitable one. Sorry that you found it hard to buy; things should be much better next week, when I expect AMEX trading to begin, or not long after that. I agree that a double within a month of active trading on AMEX is not beyond reason.

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To: levy who started this subject2/4/2001 8:47:48 PM
From: Jay Arkay
   of 69
 
Tomorrow's the day--Global starts trading on AMEX under the symbol GLE. In trading on the TSE (where it will continue to trade under the symbol GSM), the shares have shot up from C$2.20 to C$3.90 over the past two weeks. C$3.90 is just US$2.60 per share in American currency. There is rumored to be a take-over offer in the works for US$5 per share, and some of us long-time followers of Global think that the bidding could go much higher before the game is over. Global is the ONLY publicly traded company that is fully devoted to the election equipment (hardware and software) industry, and it has been a pioneer in that industry. Sales of voting equipment are about to explode in the aftermath of the US election fiasco and with the aid of hundreds of millions of dollars of US federal grants to county electoral authorities who need to modernize (Global's sales in each of the last three years were just around $20 million each, a figure that could be multiplied 3, 4, 5 or more times over the next few years; incremental sales are highly profitable, and Global has been profitable even at its recent sales levels.) Keep an eye on GLE trading tomorrow and in the weeks ahead.

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To: Jay Arkay who wrote (54)2/4/2001 11:41:20 PM
From: Jon Tara
   of 69
 
BTW, I checked with my broker, and was told that GLELF is a "mandatory conversion" to GLE, and should automatically show-up in your accounts.

If you are holding GSM.TO, you may need to talk to your broker and arrange to have it exchanged.

In at $1.57.

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To: Jay Arkay who wrote (54)2/7/2001 11:15:54 AM
From: levy
   of 69
 
I plugged in gle and got some other company?

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To: levy who wrote (56)2/7/2001 11:42:56 AM
From: Jay Arkay
   of 69
 
GLE was formerly the symbol for Gleason Corp. on NYSE, which stopped trading some time ago. GLE is also the symbol for Global ThermoElectric on the TSE. What you need to specify is GLE on AMEX, and that should produce Global Election System. Some of the quotation services may be behind in updating their symbols (though they should not) since Global started trading on AMEX just on Monday. If your quote service does not yield Global under this symbol, try a different quote service. Hope that helps.

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To: Jay Arkay who wrote (57)2/7/2001 12:15:46 PM
From: levy
   of 69
 
this says amex

siliconinvestor.com

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To: levy who wrote (58)2/7/2001 1:22:38 PM
From: Jon Tara
   of 69
 
Jay, the price and exchange are right, but everything else (company name, news) are wrong. You might try reporting to SI, but with their recent personnel cuts - good luck!

Try Yahoo - they have the correct information.

The GLE shares showed-up in my TD Waterhouse account on Tuesday morning. (Waterhouse only shows the previous day's holdings and prices, which is pretty darn annoying...)

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To: levy who started this subject2/8/2001 6:57:02 PM
From: Tom Clarke
   of 69
 
This article may be of interest

Players hoping to become big election technology providers are Votehere.net, Election.com, Safevote, and an assortment of hardware manufacturers, systems integrators, networking companies, and digital security companies. And then there are giant companies, such as IBM, which have plenty of resources to effectively take on the market. While startups like Votehere.net and Election.com have first-mover advantage, Ms. Bonsall says, "States may decide to wait it out to see if some of the big companies come in and trump what's out there."

redherring.com

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