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   Non-TechWho Really Pays Taxes?


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From: c.horn9/30/2005 4:17:36 PM
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I'm GK!!!!

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To: c.horn who wrote (656)9/30/2005 5:00:42 PM
From: Bill
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you sure are

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From: TimF9/20/2006 2:27:50 PM
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Who really pays taxes?

Apparently in the case of corporate incomes taxes, the main answer is employees.

tcsdaily.com

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To: TimF who wrote (658)9/20/2006 2:53:50 PM
From: Bill
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Good piece.

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To: TimF who wrote (658)9/20/2006 8:50:50 PM
From: c.horn
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I believe I already covered this subject somewhere in the beginning of this thread.

My point boiled down is that Corporations do not pay taxes, People do. :-)

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To: c.horn who wrote (660)9/21/2006 11:29:46 AM
From: TimF
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Yes obviously the companies don't really pay the taxes as you and others have pointed out here.

The question though is do the workers, the customers, or the investors pay the taxes. I'm sure some of the burden goes to each, but apparently the majority of it his the workers.

And then indirectly everyone pays as taxes put a drag on the economy.

I was just trying to be more specific, and provide more evidence.

This is a good thread. I suppose it was dormant for a long time because its about a limited subject, but its an important subject.

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To: Mana who wrote (637)9/21/2006 11:31:41 AM
From: TimF
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So? If taxes will be reduced for high income payer and also for low income payers, How will it be accomplished? Assuming no reduced Government spending?

It can't be accomplished without reduced spending.


It can be accomplished without actual reductions. Certainly without reductions in nominal dollars, and if your patient enough without reductions in real dollars. You just have to hold spending steady and watch the fiscal balance improve.

Of course holding spending steady isn't something politicians usually like to do.

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To: John M. Willis who wrote (647)9/21/2006 11:35:56 AM
From: TimF
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You could simply abolish the corporate tax, but tax the dividends.

Also unless you are abolishing the IRS or greatly reducing its power (which might be a very good thing but which isn't likely to happen if we continue to rely on income taxes), the IRS will simply disallow this attempt at a tax shelter. It will consider it fraudulent.

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From: TimF11/15/2006 7:44:14 PM
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Morton's Fork
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Morton's Fork is an expression that describes a choice between two equally unpleasant alternatives (in other words, a dilemma), or two lines of reasoning that lead to the same unpleasant conclusion. It is analogous to the expressions "between the devil and the deep blue sea" or "between a rock and a hard place".

The expression originates from a policy of tax collection devised by John Morton, Lord Chancellor in 1487, under the rule of Henry VII. His approach was that if the subject lived in luxury and had clearly spent a lot of money on himself, he obviously had sufficient income to spare for the king. Alternatively, if the subject lived frugally, and showed no sign of being wealthy, he must have substantial savings and could therefore afford to give it to the king. These arguments were the two prongs of the fork and regardless of whether the subject was rich or poor, he didn't have a favourable choice...

en.wikipedia.org

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From: Bill2/7/2007 11:11:08 AM
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Updated info:

The Congressional Joint Economic Committee disclosed that the richer half of the American population paid 97 percent of income taxes last year.

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