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   Technology StocksH POWER CORP (HPOW)


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To: D.Austin who wrote (64)1/9/2002 9:21:44 AM
From: D.Austin
   of 74
 
Hydrogen in, Water Out — Clearly, the AUTOnomy is Clean

DETROIT (Jan. 7, 2001) — The hydrogen-powered future just became easier to imagine with the introduction of General Motors' AUTOnomy concept vehicle. It would run cleaner, use fewer resources and conceivably last twice as long as conventional vehicles.

Fuel cell vehicles consume hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, and emit only water vapor and heat. Emissions such as carbon dioxide are removed from the picture.

However, AUTOnomy is much more than just a clean air vehicle. The GM concept provides much more value than just zero emissions and twice the fuel economy.

"Customers want better fuel economy and a cleaner environment," said Larry Burns, GM's Vice President of Research and Development and Planning. "However, they do not expect to pay more for sustainable mobility. It is incumbent on the auto industry to invent vehicles that are sustainable but do not impose tradeoffs on customers."

Government also plays a critical role, Burns said. Consumer tax incentives, for instance, would help overcome the higher initial costs of advanced technologies and create consumer demand for vehicles that include them, he said.

"AUTOnomy would also be attractive for benefits people don't even associate with fuel cells," Burns added. "It would provide very affordable all-wheel drive, unprecedented safety and comfort, re-configurable interiors, multiple bodies for differing needs, no oil changes, maintenance worries or trips to the gas station."

The chassis also could serve as a mobile energy source, providing heat and electricity for your home, he said.

"That's what will make fuel cell vehicles sell, not the environmental benefits alone. That's what we need to move to a hydrogen economy and the day when the automobile is completely removed from the environmental equation," Burns said.

The skateboard chassis, which includes the propulsion system, fuel storage, brakes, steering and other critical systems, is intended to last up to 20 years.

With a longer service life, AUTOnomy will reduce manufacturing waste and will potentially be easier to recover and recycle than today's vehicles. The body also can be made of recycled materials.

The drive-by-wire technology replaces mechanical systems with electronic ones, eliminating the need for engine oil, transmission fluid or brake fluid. That would further reduce the environmental impact of the automobile.

"Long term, this is the best solution for customers, government, industry and environmentalists," Burns said. "Policy makers in the U.S. and around the world need to give serious consideration to the power of an idea such as AUTOnomy. It is a catalyst for bringing about a hydrogen economy.

"People will buy these cars because they are passionate about them and they offer a better value than today's technology."

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To: 993racer who started this subject2/26/2002 8:58:31 AM
From: D.Austin
   of 74
 
Congressman backs fuel cell technology for U.S.




By:Bill Doak, Editor February 21, 2002




First District Congressman John B. Larson, back in the district to address a rally of veterans in Newington and speak with South End seniors about Social Security and prescription drug costs, sat down to an interview with the Gazette Wednesday.

As he detailed some of the intricate political gamesmanship on the floor of the House of Representatives, the congressman took the opportunity to explain his recent vote in favor of campaign finance reform, said he favors giving government relief to insurance companies - even though unlikely to be approved - and wants to hold off reforming accounting practices in the wake of Enron's bankruptcy.

With the country at war in Afghanistan, and dealing with both international and domestic issues, the two-term East Hartford Democrat not only seems more at ease in discussing the ins and outs of life in the Beltway he appears invigorated by the quickened pace of politics and policy in Washington D.C.

"Everyone is four-square behind Powell, Cheney and President Bush," said Larson. "That being said, domestically everyone still has a conflicting agenda."

For example, gone are the campaign promises of prescription drug reforms prior to September 11, Larson had to tell seniors. And gone as well is deficit reduction and any talk of having a "lock box" to protect Social Security.

Issues such as homeland security and dealing with the international community during a time of crisis and war have replaced the usual rhetoric, he said.

But the technology of the war has also brought a boost to the local defense industry, and made America's allies sit up and take notice. As U.S. Rep. Larson is a member of the Science Committee, he has an inside view of technology which has again made this country the envy of other nations. Technology, he believes, can get us out of future conflicts - or even prevent them before they start.

Larson notes the prevalence of Saudi nationals among the four terrorist teams September 11.

"Oil. This has been an addiction," said Larson. "American troops are camped out on Saudi Arabian soil next to Mecca to make sure there is control over their natural resource. The king collects the wealth from the oil while you have this unbelievable poverty and large groups left out of the mainstream. That was the heart of Senator Joe Lieberman's speech," calling for a more compassionate approach to resolving tensions in the Middle East, Larson related.

"The US has to figure out a way to make us energy independent."
The Congressman wants to use the military action to underscore his point on the need to wean American dependence from foreign oil. He is pushing a "hydrogen" economy based on fuel cells, power generating devices which chemically break down natural gas into water, extracting hydrogen for fuel.

"This technology is not 20 years away, it is two years away," Larson stated. Such fuel cells ought to be used on local buses, such as those using the planned New Britain-Hartford busway. "There should also be trolley-like buses powered by fuel cells."

Government should also create a market by holding a competition amongst the top three auto makers, the congressman added, and cap future oil reserves for "future generations" to use in case of an emergency.

Larson said the fuel cell development could help create a "critical mass" centered in the Connecticut River valley.

"This is the way to go. And it will foster the use of fuel cells in other countries as well."

Noting the new configuration of the First Congressional District, which Larson describes as a "backwards C or a crab," the congressman now counts among his constituencies Bradley International Airport, part of the city of Torrington, part of Middletown and the north half of Glastonbury.

"I consider the whole city as being in my district," said Larson.
The congressman said he "feels very lucky" that the district remains overwhelmingly Democratic. Asked if he would entertain a run for Senate, the former East Hartford teacher said he is "very content" in his current role in Washington D.C.

The congressman, who also co-owned an East Hartford insurance agency, also said he hopes to revisit a reform package to help the insurance industry obtain some government relief from major catastrophes it now faces during a time of possible terrorism and war.

"The defense department says it is 100 percent certain September 11 will happen again. Now, actuaries have to consider that when they underwrite property. How do you do that in New York City, where the cost of September 11 is already $40 billion?"
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To: 993racer who started this subject2/26/2002 9:43:52 AM
From: D.Austin
   of 74
 
added @ 2.39 Building up my free share's---
LoOkInG tO sElL aGaIn--low 4's

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To: D.Austin who wrote (67)2/26/2002 11:29:34 AM
From: Scoobah
   of 74
 
a Major defection from HPOW to DCH ??

Tuesday February 26, 11:00 am Eastern Time
Press Release

SOURCE: DCH Technology, Inc.

DCH Adds Malhotra To New Management Team
VALENCIA, Calif., Feb. 26 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- DCH Technology, Inc. (Amex: DCH - news), a manufacturer of hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen sensors and provider of hydrogen safety services, announced the hiring of Dr. Sanjiv Malhotra as Vice President -- Business Development and Marketing for all DCH lines of business. Malhotra is a well-known and influential participant in the hydrogen energy industry, most recently serving as Director, Business Development, Marketing and Sales for H Power Corporation. Malhotra assumed his DCH position yesterday morning.

While serving H Power, Malhotra spearheaded the formation of several strategic business alliances -- forging financial, joint development and marketing agreements generating substantial revenues and establishing significant channels to market. He also negotiated revenue-generating research contracts and licensing fees.

``One of our highest strategic priorities entering 2002 was to bring in an established business development executive to assist our transition to commercial operations, and we are fortunate to retain an individual of Dr. Malhotra's status in the industry,'' said John Donohue, DCH President and Chief Executive Officer. ``Sanjiv understands the business dynamics of the hydrogen power industry extremely well. He brings to DCH exceptional experience and tremendous credibility. We are confident that he will accelerate the outreach activities we have in place and open the door to several potential partners we've targeted.''

``I am impressed by DCH's proven technology, new management team, and the strong strategic plan they have that focuses on the nearest-term commercialization opportunities,'' Malhotra said. ``My experience on both the technical side and business side of hydrogen matches well with this vision. I'm totally focused on generating some very exciting and significant partnerships for the Company.''

Malhotra holds both a Doctorate in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering and Masters in Business Administration from the University of Iowa. He has authored and presented several technical and business presentations on fuel cells. Malhotra was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, where he was involved with a fuel cell project funded by the Electric Power Research Institute.

For additional information, please contact Investor Relations at 1-661-775-4380 or at invest@dcht.com. Web page: www.dcht.com .

Safe Harbor: This press release includes statements that are considered ``forward-looking'' within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements reflect DCH Technology's current views about future events and performance. Investors should not rely on these statements because they are subject to a variety of risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. These factors include, but are not limited to, the cost of development and market acceptance of DCH's sensor-based systems and fuel cells as well as fuel cells in general, the availability of financing for DCH's operations, the ability of DCH to secure strategic investors, competition, the cost and availability of materials, governmental regulations, and other factors detailed in DCH Technology's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

SOURCE: DCH Technology, Inc.

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To: Scoobah who wrote (68)2/26/2002 8:49:06 PM
From: Silicon Trader
   of 74
 
HPOW chart looks great ,,, should go higher from here

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To: Scoobah who wrote (68)2/26/2002 11:42:01 PM
From: D.Austin
   of 74
 
Heeeeellllllllllo H2SteveO
I really cannot comment on that one.I try and stick with the risky plays I know best.
I believe the chart on this one looks like a coiled spring.
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Check out the green line on this chart

askresearch.com
symbol=HPOW&country=USA&size=1024x768&months=12+months&type=Bar&color=Modern&scale=Logarithmic&overlay=exponential&moving1=50+day&moving2=200+day&moving3=None&bollinger=20+day&ind_vol=on&ind_sto=on&sto=15-5-5&wpr=12&rsi=8&ind_macd=on&macd=12-25-9&roc=16-8&ind_mfi=on&mfi=13&refresh=180

and a gap up to 3 is just around the corner.

see ya Dennis

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To: 993racer who started this subject4/2/2002 9:55:59 AM
From: D.Austin
   of 74
 
thenation.com

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To: 993racer who started this subject4/22/2002 7:14:40 PM
From: DEM
   of 74
 
Anybody see any news causing the bump at the end of the day on fuel cell companies? Thanks

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To: DEM who wrote (72)8/6/2002 7:52:42 PM
From: Oak Tree
   of 74
 
Are you interested in this stock. I met a guy on a plane from this company. They were buying a Canadian company that makes special rugged outdoor LEDs for marking the road. He claimed that HPOW had the best technology for fuel cells. Wasn't obvious however that they had any useful patents. I bought a couple thousand shares anyway.

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To: Oak Tree who wrote (73)2/14/2004 10:27:00 AM
From: Keith Fauci
   of 74
 
cnn.com

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