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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46802)1/31/2021 2:26:07 AM
From: elmatador
2 Recommendations   of 46820
 
Wi-Fi proponent Jessica Rosenworcel to lead FCC as Acting Chairwoman

January 24, 2021 | Breaking News | by Claus Hetting, Wi-Fi NOW CEO & Chairman

By Claus Hetting, Wi-Fi NOW CEO & Chairman

On Thursday of last week the new US administration picked 8-year commissioner veteran Jessica Rosenworcel to succeed Ajit Pai at the helm of the FCC. For now Ms Rosenworcel will lead the FCC as Acting Chairwoman. Jessica Rosenworcel has been a passionate Wi-Fi proponent for her entire FCC career.

We suspected it would happen – and frankly some of us have been silently cheering it on – then on Thursday it finally did: Long-time Wi-Fi proponent and 8-year FCC veteran Jessica Rosenworcel has been selected by the new US administration to succeed Ajit Pai at the helm of the world’s most powerful telecom regulatory body, the Federal Communications Commission.

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Ms Rosenworcel has been designated ‘Acting Chairwoman’ for now but it is not unreasonable to expect that she may eventually be confirmed for the permanent FCC chairmanship of the Biden administration. There are no specific rules as to how US administrations choose their FCC chairpersons and previous chairman Ajit Pai was also selected from among presiding FCC commissioners by the Trump administration at the time .

Above: Jessica Rosenworcel – today Acting Chairwoman of the FCC – being interviewed by Wi-Fi NOW CEO Claus Hetting at Wi-Fi NOW USA 2016 in Washington, D.C.For now the Wi-Fi industry will be more than delighted that one huge Wi-Fi proponent – in the form of Ajit Pai – has been replaced by another to head the FCC. Ms Rosenworcel has consistently been an outspoken and fervent supporter of more spectrum and more Wi-Fi-friendly regulation including spearheading the effort to release the 5.9 GHz band and strongly supporting Ajit Pai’s drive to release the full 6 GHz band to unlicensed use.

Ms Rosenworcel is a strong advocate of connecting all Americans with broadband services and has been particularly vocal on the need to finally close the ‘homework gap’ giving all children across the US access to the Internet connectivity they need for schooling and education. She’s also a big supporter of upgrading the US federal government’s widely successful E-rate program (in existence since 1996) intended to make broadband services more affordable for schools and libraries across the nation.

Ms Rosenworcel has been a frequent speaker at Wi-Fi NOW events starting at our inaugural US event in Washington DC in 2016 and most recently at the virtual Wi-Fi World Congress this past October ( see the interview here).

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To: elmatador who wrote (46804)1/31/2021 9:02:10 PM
From: Peter Ecclesine
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
We met with FCC OET and WTB to discuss next steps in using FCC ULS data to
protect 6 GHz incumbents
ecfsapi.fcc.gov

and answer questions on the TR-1008
ecfsapi.fcc.gov

I am in a group that is putting the 6 GHz band in harness, much like the 5 GHz band was put
in harness in the early 2000s.

1200 MHz has a lot of uses we cannot foresee.

Wi-Fi Now is useful to say the obvious, the toothpaste is coming out of the tube.

802.11ax was approve January 26 and will be published soon, after IEEE Std 802.11-2020 is published in mid-February.

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46805)1/31/2021 9:06:25 PM
From: engineer
   of 46820
 
interesting Peter that the 802.11ax is finally approved, but has been in chipsets for more than 3 years. I did not realize that it was not a fully "approved" standard until now.

Thanks for that.

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To: engineer who wrote (46806)1/31/2021 9:27:14 PM
From: Peter Ecclesine
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
The big amendments, 11ac, 11ax, 11be take 5-7 years
11ac started in 2008, 11ax started in 2014, 11be started in 2019

ieee802.org

WiFi Alliance does an early release approval before the amendment is published, then an r2
a couple of years later with whatever options become popular.

Getting a 2000 person year project over the finish line is hard, as many pull away to the next big project.

Look at start and RevCom and SB approval timespans on your favorite amendments.

Little ones like 11j Japan, 11y 3650 MHz, 11af TVWS take 2-3 years, depending on Korea Inc or other
opposing blocks.

petere

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46807)2/1/2021 2:10:07 AM
From: elmatador
   of 46820
 
Good stuff.
Have you met the author of the article Claus Hetting CEO of Wi-Fi NOW?

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To: elmatador who wrote (46808)2/1/2021 7:28:30 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46820
 
Yes, we were on video conf with Claus last week to discuss a 6 GHz workshop. He had slipped on ice the day before and was waiting minor surgery. Wi-Fi NOW does market promotion where opportunity presents - e.g., April 24, 2020 in Washington DC. Right now Regions 1 and 2 are presenting opportunities.

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46809)2/1/2021 9:47:14 AM
From: elmatador
   of 46820
 
Yes. He broke his wrist and had to to get the bones screwed back into place

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To: elmatador who wrote (46810)3/4/2021 11:52:53 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46820
 
Wi-Fi NOW Brazil 6 GHz - starts about 38 minutes in for 20 minutes - slides in English, speaker in Portugese, questions in English Klaus conducts the discussion

wifinowglobal.com <- registration required.

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From: Peter Ecclesine3/17/2021 4:38:08 PM
3 Recommendations   of 46820
 
Revisiting Wireless Internet Connectivity: 5G vs Wi-Fi 6

Herein we revisited the debate associated with wireless Internet connectivity by providing a new evaluation of the two main technologies involved in the provision of next generation wireless broadband: 5G and Wi-Fi 6. Our analysis highlights how the futures for 5G and Wi-Fi 6 needs to be understood within the larger context of how earlier generations of cellular and Wi-Fi technologies have shaped the evolution of wireless networking and what this may mean for the future.

sciencedirect.com

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46812)8/16/2021 12:38:12 AM
From: elmatador
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
Telecoms innovation talk may be nothing but hot air

A history of squandered opportunity bodes ill for technology growth
Fildes AUGUST 13 2021

No expense was spared when Telefónica set up its London incubator a decade ago, as the Spanish telecoms group installed collaborative spaces, gaming pods and meeting rooms in the form of hot-air balloons. Staff from the company’s UK mobile network O2 were not even allowed in.

Telefónica Digital was dissolved after just two and a half years. But it stands as the sector’s boldest attempt to tap into start-up stardust.

Cash-rich telecoms companies with tens of millions of customers should be hothouses for innovation. But although the sector has been critical to the digital age, it has squandered the opportunity to be a tech trailblazer.

The industry has been exceptional at predicting the future but spectacularly bad at reaping the benefits. The first cloud storage, digital content, mobile payments and video conferencing services all bore telecoms brands and became highly lucrative ventures — for other companies.

The MP3 compression technology that drove the download market was invented by Telecom Italia staff. Three, the UK operator, pre-empted the era of YouTube and Spotify by launching successful video sharing and music platforms. Vodafone was ahead of the curve on mobile wallets and mobile commerce. Yet none paid off in extra profit.

Buying into the future hasn’t worked either. BT spied an opportunity to connect phone calls within apps when it bought promising US start up Ribbit in 2009. Ribbit quickly failed but rivals have blossomed. Twilio, for example, is now valued at $67bn — more than twice the current market value of BT.

The common theme on why these attempts to innovate fail is hierarchy. Telecoms companies are large, regulated, bureaucratic beasts that demand control and lack patience. Bright ideas are smothered at birth as boards have become risk averse.

That caution is evident at BT’s research labs. Adastral Park, which takes its name from the Latin per ardua ad astra (through adversity to the stars), is driven not by “moonshots” but “applied research”. That esoteric work may underpin huge advances in future telecoms networks but it is unlikely that BT’s consumers and investors will even notice.

It is a similar story at Bell Labs. The US research powerhouse, once the beating heart of then all-powerful AT&T, lays claim to inventing everything from transistors to information theory to the digital hearing aid. Yet author Douglas Coupland described finding a company under a “massive bell jar in which time has gone static” when he visited last decade.

A new generation of telecoms executives are once again talking up a big growth game in digital innovation based on 5G and full fibre. They paint a picture of networks at the heart of an even more connected world. Yet research & development spend sits between 1 per cent and 2 per cent of revenue at most large telecoms companies, according to MTN Consulting.

Even Telefónica relaunched a dedicated technology arm two years ago promising double-digit growth once again. As it tries to sell a stake in the business, the proceeds may tell us if the latest tech drive was worth the effort or just another case of hot air.

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