SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology StocksThe *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (46763)2/5/2020 3:33:13 AM
From: elmatador
   of 46812
 
Axial aka Jim Kayne was a good member of this forum and I have several discussions with him.

May his soul rest in peace.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (46765)2/5/2020 3:33:42 AM
From: elmatador
   of 46812
 
Will 5G flop?

Are we seeing the ISDN of the 21st century?
planetanalog.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)


To: elmatador who wrote (46776)2/5/2020 3:48:59 AM
From: Elroy Jetson
   of 46812
 
One of the most dangerous aspects of the newer GHz frequencies used for the 802.11ad WiGig and 5G cell phone networks is their energy is unable to penetrate the human body.

Some of the GHz waves bounce off your skin and are scattered, while some are converted into heat similar to sunlight - but at much lower power levels.

As a result there's a great danger that these GHz frequencies will never reach your phone or the transmission tower.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)


To: elmatador who wrote (46776)2/5/2020 8:18:04 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
1 Recommendation   of 46812
 
Hi Elmat,

The PlanetAnalog article on iW modulation took me back two decades to xG, a Florida based radio modulation whose demonstration involved a bus ride from the base of the tower to a "distant" receive site, no cellphones allowed. Needless to say, the line of sight distance between tower and receive sight was much less than the distance the bus traveled around the plantation.

The article compares iW at 3 GHz to QAM at 28 GHz, which inherently is
69.5 dB pathloss to 88.9 dB pathloss, a difference of 19.4 dB due to frequency alone.

linuxfromscratch.org

It is good to see software defined radios in the wild, but I take the claim of "reducing the need for bit checking and extreme transmission power levels" with a grain of salt as production Wi-Fi does more with low transmit power levels.

IEEE 802.11ax features 1024 QAM up to eight spatial streams

cisco.com

802.11ax and 5G cannot flop, but what is promised can change to align with what is delivered.

petere

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Elroy Jetson who wrote (46777)2/5/2020 8:25:36 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46812
 
Hi Elroy,

The Mobile Manufacturers Forum is engaged on RF safety, especially the newer GHz frequencies.

emfhealth.info

A new SAR standard above 6 GHz is expected in March.

The mm frequency cellphones know which antennas are close to the person, and put more energy into antennas that are no shrouded by the person.

petere

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46779)2/5/2020 5:22:36 PM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46812
 
About measuring RF exposure above 6 GHz:
The revised IEEE C95.1 has been published which includes revised limits above 6GHz.

We do have some test guidance from FCC

petere




Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Elroy Jetson who wrote (46777)2/14/2020 1:49:30 AM
From: elmatador
   of 46812
 
Cisco is playing hard to get... Chuck Robbins, the chief executive of Cisco Systems, ruled out taking control Nokia and Ericsson, a blow to the Trump administration’s hopes of creating a champion to counter Huawei

linkedin.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)


To: elmatador who wrote (46781)2/14/2020 4:14:34 AM
From: Elroy Jetson
   of 46812
 
There'd better be a pay-off at the end of the "playing hard to get".

I own Cisco shares and have been getting very little respect. Just a 3% dividend and a bunch of drama.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: elmatador who wrote (46781)2/14/2020 7:56:35 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46812
 
Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found here.
ft.com

"Cisco is already working with Japanese ecommerce company Rakuten on building a mobile network based on the new [OpenRAN] technology, with US start-up Altiostar supplying the key software at the heart of the system. Most mobile operators, however, are set to upgrade their existing networks to prepare for 5G, rather than build networks like this from the ground up."

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46783)2/14/2020 9:10:00 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46812
 
It looks like the EC Radio Spectrum Policy Group sees opportunity

RSPG20-005 rspg-spectrum.eu

Page 12 New Radio Spectrum Policy Programme (RSPP)

Scope of RSPG activity
The RSPG will develop an opinion contributing to a new multiannual RSPP taking into account the latest technological and regulatory developments and Union policy objectives, including the need to support Gigabit connectivity and climate neutrality targets. The new RSPP should apply up to 2030 and cover various sectors and Union policies using spectrum.
To this end and with regard to the Request for an Opinion on an RSPP by the Commission, the RSPG will consider the following topics:
- making available at least 12 GHz of spectrum below 100 GHz to promote innovative wireless services (including WiFi and 5G and beyond);
- concrete coordinated actions to facilitate the take-up of shared spectrum use;
- the positive impact of technological innovation on efficient spectrum use;
- network evolution and spectrum needs of terrestrial broadcasting and PMSE;
- specific SMEs needs for spectrum;
- approaches to improve environmental sustainability in relation to spectrum authorisation, management and use.
- Improve the visibility of measures to ensure coherence between harmonised standards (RED) and spectrum regulatory framework, and
- opportunities for coordination between civilian and military use of spectrum,

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)
Previous 10 Next 10