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From: Glenn Petersen7/6/2019 11:10:50 AM
1 Recommendation   of 46802
 
What Trump’s Huawei Reversal Means for the Future of 5G

Huawei is the top threat to American dominance in wireless technology. And the U.S. is woefully, even disgracefully, behind.

By Andrew Ross Sorkin
New York Times
DealBook
July 1, 2019



A Bangkok shop selling phones from Huawei, the Chinese company that poses the biggest threat to the United States’ dominance of the future of wireless technology.CreditCreditDiego Azubel/EPA, via Shutterstock
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In an impromptu question-and-answer session late last month at the White House, President Trump was asked about the nation’s efforts to block Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications company, from doing business in the United States and with our allies around the globe.

“Huawei is something that is very dangerous,” Mr. Trump said. Then, almost in the same breath, he added: “It’s possible that Huawei would be included in a trade deal. If we made a deal, I can imagine Huawei being included in some form or some part of a trade deal.”

Over the weekend in Japan, Mr. Trump appeared to choose trade over national security, suspending the ban on United States companies’ supplying equipment to Huawei as he hopes to reach a trade deal with President Xi Jinping of China. Without providing any details, he declared that American companies could sell to Huawei without creating a “great, national emergency problem.”

He said this even as own secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, spent the past several months traveling the world warning our allies that Huawei is a profoundly dangerous security threat and instructing them to freeze out the company.

Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, used Twitter to call Mr. Trump’s reversal “a catastrophic mistake” that “will destroy the credibility of his administration’s warnings about the threat posed by the company, no one will ever again take them seriously.” (Mr. Trump followed the same playbook with ZTE earlier this year, banning it and then reversing the ban to placate the Chinese.)

While Mr. Trump may view Huawei as both “dangerous” and a pawn in the trade war, the truth is it may be something else entirely.

Huawei is the most significant long-term competitive threat to the United States’ dominance of the future of wireless technology. And the United States is woefully — even disgracefully — behind.

No matter what the United States does to hobble Huawei — and Mr. Trump’s latest stance will only hasten its rise — it will not alter a fundamental problem that clouds the conversation: The United States needs a meaningful strategy to lead the world in next-generation wireless technology — a kind of Manhattan Project for the future of connectivity.

Don’t take my word for it.

In April, amid the frenzy over the report from Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel investigating Russian election interference, another alarming government report was issued — and largely overlooked.

It was written by the Defense Innovation Board, a group of business leaders and academics that advises the Defense Department. And it was a scathing indictment of the country’s 5G efforts.

“The leader of 5G stands to gain hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue over the next decade, with widespread job creation across the wireless technology sector,” wrote the board, a who’s-who of the tech world that includes the former Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt, the LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and Walter Isaacson, the author and a former chief executive of the Aspen Institute.

“The country that owns 5G will own many of these innovations and set the standards for the rest of the world,” the board wrote.

It added in no uncertain terms: “That country is currently not likely to be the United States.”

It is no wonder. No American company makes the devices that transmit high-speed wireless signals. Huawei is the clear leader in the field; the Swedish company Ericsson is a distant second; and the Finnish company Nokia is third.

It is almost surprising that the Defense Department allowed the report to be published at all, given the board’s remarkably blunt assessment of the nation’s lack of innovation and what it said was one of the biggest impediments to rolling out 5G in the United States: the Pentagon itself.

The board said the broadband spectrum needed to create a successful network was reserved not for commercial purposes but for the military.

To work best, 5G needs what’s called low-band spectrum, because it allows signals to travel farther than high-band spectrum. The farther the signal can travel, the less infrastructure has to be deployed.

In China and even in Europe, governments have reserved low-band spectrum for 5G, making it efficient and less costly to blanket their countries with high-speed wireless connectivity. In the United States, the low-band spectrum is reserved for the military.

The difference this makes is stark. Google conducted an experiment for the board, placing 5G transmitters on 72,735 towers and rooftops. Using high-band spectrum, the transmitters covered only 11.6 percent of the United States population at a speed of 100 megabits per second and only 3.9 percent at 1 gigabit per second. If the same transmitters could use low-band spectrum, 57.4 percent of the population would be covered at 100 megabits per second and 21.2 percent at 1 gigabit per second.



A London sign advertising 5G, which works best using a part of the wireless spectrum that in the United States is reserved for the military.CreditSuzie Howell for The New York Times
__________

In other words, the spectrum that has been allotted in the United States for commercial 5G communications makes 5G significantly slower and more expensive to roll out than just about anywhere else.

That is a commercial disincentive and puts the United States at a distinct disadvantage.

The spectrum challenge creates a negative feedback loop for manufacturers, which may help explain why no major American technology company has jumped into the fray. But since President Trump issued an executive order that banned the purchase of equipment from companies posing a national security threat — which include Huawei — it threatens the ability of American companies to expand their 5G networks, particularly in rural areas.

United States phone companies like AT&T and Verizon may end up seeking to manufacture their own transmitters given the dearth of options.

Not winning the 5G contest comes with consequences. “If China leads the field in 5G infrastructure and systems, then the future 5G ecosystem will likely have Chinese components embedded throughout,” the Defense Innovation Board wrote. “This would pose a serious threat to the security of D.O.D. operations and networks going forward.”

One of the board’s recommendations is that the Defense Department share its low-band spectrum to accelerate the commercial development of the technology in the United States.

While sharing spectrum comes with its own security challenges, the board raised the prospect of some unique, surprising benefits: “Integration of government and civil use may provide a layer of security by allowing military traffic to ‘hide in plain sight’ as traffic becomes more difficult to see and isolate. Similarly, adversaries might be deterred from jamming this spectrum because they might be operating on the same bands.”

None of this is meant to suggest that Huawei does not represent a national security threat if the Chinese government were to use it to spy on foreign adversaries in the future. (Though, it is worth saying, there is no evidence presented publicly by any American agency that the company’s hardware has been used that way — yet.)

Nor should it be read as an apology for Huawei’s record of stealing intellectual property, which has been well chronicled.

Sharing spectrum should be only the start, however. Policymakers must grasp that the “market” in the United States isn’t working the way it should, especially when state actors like China are supporting companies like Huawei.

If the United States is going to lead the world, Washington needs to think hard about the incentives it provides companies — not only for research and development, where we are still leading, but also for manufacturing the technology that is in our national interest to control as well as what mergers it allows.

One morning in late February, Mr. Trump typed out a message on Twitter: “I want the United States to win through competition, not by blocking out currently more advanced technologies.”

That is a worthy goal, and an achievable one. But it requires more than the Band-Aid solution that is a trade deal or a blacklist. It requires a new strategy.

Maybe we’ll have one in time for 6G.

Andrew Ross Sorkin is a columnist and the founder and editor-at-large of DealBook. He is a co-anchor of CNBC’s Squawk Box and the author of “Too Big to Fail.” He is also the co-creator of the Showtime drama series Billions. @andrewrsorkin Facebook

A version of this article appears in print on July 1, 2019, on Page B1 of the New York edition with the headline: U.S. Lags In the Race For 5G Edge.

nytimes.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio8/24/2019 11:19:30 AM
6 Recommendations   of 46802
 
axial, R.I.P.
--
Dear Fellow Forum Members,

It is with deep sorrow and a heavy heart that I must inform you of the passing of Jim Kayne, a.k.a. axial, a longtime forum member and, for a while, one of the board's most active participants. Jim died on July 8th from a heart attack while doing some renovations.

I learned of Jim's passing while cruising the Cook Report on Internet Economics mailing list several weeks after its posting, where a lifelong friend of his, after gaining access to his pc and files, sent out notices to apparent friends and colleagues.

I'll be obtaining additional contact information over the next several days, which I'll make available via PM to interested members who contact me with a request. Or, you can simply PM me and leave your email address if you prefer.

Sincerely,
Frank A. Coluccio

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (46762)9/11/2019 8:07:24 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46802
 
Huawei Has a Plan to Help End Its War With Trump During a rare interview, the company’s chief executive proposed negotiations with the Justice Department.

By Thomas L. Friedman Opinion Columnist Sept. 10, 2019


nytimes.com After a week of interviews in Beijing, Shenzhen and Hong Kong, I’ve come away with some strong feelings about the United States-China trade dispute. There are two battlefronts: One is the negotiation to eliminate the barriers to American companies competing in China, and the other is what to do about Huawei, China’s enormous telecom networking company that Beijing sees as a crown jewel of national innovation and the Trump team sees as a giant global espionage device.

<> That is why I was happy to accept the invitation of Huawei’s founder and chief executive, Ren Zhengfei, to come to his company’s headquarters in Shenzhen for a rare interview, which he used to — for the first time — propose negotiations with the Justice Department to try to resolve all the outstanding issues between Washington and Huawei.

<> Ren told me: “If the U.S. reaches out to us in good faith and promises to change their irrational approach to Huawei, then we are open to a dialogue. The U.S. shouldn’t try to destroy Huawei over something trivial. If the U.S. feels we have done something wrong, then we can discuss it in good faith and find a reasonable solution. I think we can accept that approach."

He added for emphasis, “There are no restrictions on what we would be willing to discuss with the Department of Justice.”

And if the United States — which has no indigenous 5G networking manufacturer — still does not trust Huawei to install its equipment across America at scale, added Ren, then he is also ready, for the first time, to license the entire Huawei 5G platform to any American company that wants to manufacturer it and install it and operate it, completely independent of Huawei.

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From: Frank A. Coluccio10/2/2019 2:51:26 PM
1 Recommendation   of 46802
 
Huawei CEO Has an Elaborate Plan to Create a 5G Rival in the U.S.

Naomi Xu Elegant | September 28, 2019

Huawei Technologies Co Ltd. is willing to license its 5G cellular networking technology to another rival company for a one-time fee—provided that company is American.

Cont. : fortune.com

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From: Peter Ecclesine12/18/2019 1:35:48 PM
1 Recommendation   of 46802
 
Hi All,

Cisco announced Cisco One, the unification of switching and routing silicon
ONE Silicon, ONE Experience, MULTIPLE Roles
blogs.cisco.com

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46766)12/22/2019 12:58:06 PM
From: Lazarus
   of 46802
 
Can you ELI5 the significance of that.

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To: Lazarus who wrote (46767)12/23/2019 12:01:58 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46802
 
Cisco has a common hardware group developing ASICs for all products, meaning

CiscoOne management and processing will be across most wireless and wire access technologies

e.g., common random MAC address processing, common multicast forwarding, etc.

Most switching products do not understand or manage wireless the same way they manage wired.

The significance is to organizations with a lot of wireless connectivity.

petere

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46768)12/23/2019 12:10:05 AM
From: Lazarus
   of 46802
 
Thanks Peter. Of course, having read that I'm glad I'm not 5 'cuz my 67 year old mind doesnt quite get it. But, I will put CSCO on watch. I though to buy it around $14 - $17 after the dot-com bust but never did.

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (46768)12/23/2019 12:21:20 AM
From: Lazarus
   of 46802
 
Thanks Peter. Of course, having read that I'm glad I'm not 5 'cuz my 67 year old mind doesnt quite get it. But, I will put CSCO on watch. I though to buy it around $14 - $17 after the dot-com bust but never did.

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To: Lazarus who wrote (46770)12/23/2019 7:30:13 AM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46802
 
Internet of crap (encryption): IoT gear is generating easy-to-crack keys

Poor entropy in embedded devices leading to weaker certificates: study
By Shaun Nichols in San Francisco 16 Dec 2019 at 14:00
theregister.co.uk

[

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