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From: elmatador2/21/2019 11:55:07 PM
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U.S. won't partner with countries that use Huawei systems - U.S.'s Pompeo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday warned that the United States would not be able to partner with or share information with countries that adopt Huawei Technologies Co Ltd systems, citing security concerns.

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In an interview on Fox Business Network, Pompeo said nations in Europe and elsewhere need to understand the risks of implementing Huawei’s telecommunications equipment and that when they did, they would ultimately not use the company’s systems.

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“If a country adopts this and puts it in some of their critical information systems, we won’t be able to share information with them, we won’t be able to work alongside them,” Pompeo said.

“We’re not going to put American information at risk,” he added.

Asked about European nations pushing back on U.S. calls to ban Huawei, Pompeo said the United States has been talking to other nations to make sure they “understand the risk of putting this Huawei technology into their IT systems” and that “they’ll make good decisions when they understand that risk.”

Reporting by Susan Heavey and Makini Brice; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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From: ftth2/25/2019 8:11:50 PM
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1TB microSD cards are now a thing
LINK

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To: ftth who wrote (46737)2/25/2019 11:04:09 PM
From: Elroy Jetson
1 Recommendation   of 46765
 
All the more reason for all phone makers to emulate Samsung and build phones with an SD slot.

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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (46721)2/27/2019 4:18:33 AM
From: elmatador
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Europeans trying to accommodate Huawei will delay 5G. They will bring back the old regime of the 70s.

linkedin.com

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From: Elroy Jetson2/27/2019 4:26:38 PM
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Sprint has a lot of high-frequency capacity to carry fast data but far too few transmitters which will have to be densely located to make use of this frequency.

So Sprint is already implementing a sneaky and curious new program to greatly increase their number of high-frequency small cell transmitters by offering their customers a free "magic box" for their home or business. They want you to place your "magic box" next to a window - not for you, but for everyone outside of your building.

A Sprint "magic box" is a cell site which connects to your network and uses your electricity.

It provides you faster wireless data service, along with everyone else within a block or two. If you request a "magic box" but do not plug it in or return it, Sprint will charge you $140.

So long as you keep your "magic box" fed and connected to your network it's "free" - but it can't improve your voice call quality, only provide a faster data connection because unlike T-Mobile, the Sprint network does not implement VoLTE voice over data, currently (Voice over LTE) but with a new phone Voice over 5G.

The 260,000 Sprint "magic boxes" already distributed are 4G-LTE but 5G "magic boxes" are a few months away.

MAGIC BOX - volunteer to become part of Sprint's network - sprint.com


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To: Elroy Jetson who wrote (46740)2/28/2019 3:23:51 AM
From: elmatador
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FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says US tops all other countries in 5G technology race

The head of the Federal Communications Commission says the U.S. is leading the world in the development and deployment of 5G technology.

"In my view, we're in the lead with respect to 5G," FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said to the Wall Street Journal in a interview during which he expressed his pleasure with the way telecommunications companies are developing the infrastructure necessary for the new wave of mobile broadband across the country.

The administration has viewed the deployment of the technology as a step in safeguarding national security interests. In the middle of the race for 5G is a technological competition with China for global 5G supremacy.

The Mobile World Congress in Barcelona has proved to be a theater for that 5G race with international delegations sent from around the world ready to begin partnership talks. The FCC chairman, who forms part of the U.S. delegation sent to Barcelona, has been jockeying potential suitors and is meeting with allies to set a contractual framework putting U.S. companies at the forefront of global deployment of 5G technology. At the conference, Chinese telecommunication giant Huawei unveiled their new 5G-capable devices and announced a 5G partnership with the United Arab Emirates.

“It’s much more of a concrete discussion now because we really are on the doorstep of 5G deployments at scale,” Pai said. “In past years, when 5G was much more of an abstraction to some, I suppose both the potential and challenges of 5G networks weren’t as concretely presented to regulators and businesspeople alike.”

Both the federal government and firms in the U.S. technology industry have been spurred by Trump to ramp up the production of 5G-capable technologies and the deployment of the 5G broadband networks across the country. Last week, the president expressed that he wanted more U.S. companies to move towards the adoption of 5G technology or risk "getting left behind."

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To: elmatador who wrote (46741)2/28/2019 4:17:39 AM
From: Elroy Jetson
   of 46765
 
I don't know that he's right or wrong, but consider the source.


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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (46721)3/5/2019 7:29:18 AM
From: elmatador
   of 46765
 
How 5G will be built
linkedin.com

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From: TimF3/5/2019 9:36:51 AM
1 Recommendation   of 46765
 
Apple Plans to Close Stores in Eastern District of Texas in Fight Against Patent Trolls [Updated]
Friday February 22, 2019 7:30 am PST by Joe Rossignol

Apple plans to close both of its retail stores within the Eastern District of Texas in a few months from now in an effort to protect itself from patent trolls, according to five sources familiar with the matter.

Apple Willow Bend in Plano, Texas and Apple Stonebriar in Frisco, Texas, both located in the northern suburbs of Dallas, are expected to permanently close in mid April. One source said each store's final day of business will be Friday, April 12. Employees were briefed about the plans earlier this week.

To continue to serve the region, Apple plans to open a new store at the Galleria Dallas shopping mall in Dallas, just outside the Eastern District of Texas border. One source said the store will open Saturday, April 13.



The plans are significant, as U.S. law states that patent infringement lawsuits may be filed "where the defendant has committed acts of infringement and has a regular and established place of business." By closing its stores in Eastern Texas, Apple is ending its established place of business in the district.

Residency is also a factor in determining the applicable venue of a patent infringement lawsuit, but in May 2017, the Supreme Court shifted precedent by ruling that a U.S. corporation resides only in its state of incorporation. Apple is incorporated in California, not Texas, satisfying this clause.

The Eastern District of Texas has been a hotbed for patent litigation over the past few decades due to well-established rules for patent infringement cases, experienced judges, lower probability of cases being transferred to another district, and quicker jury verdicts, according to a SMU Dedman School of Law paper.

Patent infringement lawsuits against Apple will likely shift to U.S. district courts in Northern California and Delaware.

Fortunately, we're hearing that the plans, while inconvenient, are not too detrimental for employees. One source said Apple has offered employees opportunities to transfer to other stores, work from home for AppleCare, or severance to those who are not interested in working at another Apple location.

Apple has yet to publicly announce the plans. We reached out to Apple for comment late Thursday but have yet to hear back.

Update: Apple has confirmed the impending store closures in a statement issued to TechCrunch:
We're making a major investment in our stores in Texas, including significant upgrades to NorthPark Center, Southlake and Knox Street. With a new Dallas store coming to the Dallas Galleria this April, we've made the decision to consolidate stores and close Apple Stonebriar and Apple Willow Bend. All employees from those stores will be offered positions at the new Dallas store or other Apple locations.
Apple did not provide a specific reason for the store closures beyond consolidation.

macrumors.com

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From: Peter Ecclesine3/13/2019 2:12:06 PM
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IEEE 802.11 Real Time Analytics summary and recommendations 19/65r6

mentor.ieee.org

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