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   Technology StocksThe *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum


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From: axial1/18/2013 8:39:35 PM
   of 46820
 
Trial for asteroid course deflection

Space agency to smash 660-pound spacecraft into near-Earth asteroid

' The European Space Agency (ESA) is preparing to tackle a seemingly impossible task, the deflection of a near-Earth asteroid in 2022. The ESA will conduct a live test run on 65803 Didymos, which is 800 meters across. Unlike asteroid Apophis, 65803 Didymos is not an asteroid that’s likely to impact Earth, meaning that the ESA’s test run will not be an Armageddon-like effort to save mankind from impending doom. As DVICE points out, the ESA is simply going to attempt to alter the trajectory of a near-Earth asteroid to determine that if it had been on deadly collision course with Earth, the impact would have made it miss.'

thespacereporter.com

Jim

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From: axial1/18/2013 10:03:09 PM
   of 46820
 
CNET, CBS and the Newspaper/Broadcast Cross-Ownership Rules

' Let me add to this yet-another-reminder why media ownership matters. One occasionally hears alleged that media owners will never risk such damage to their brand as to intentionally interfere with their co-owned distribution platforms. As incidents like this remind us, that is just wishful thinking. People do stupid crap all the time. But when I make a stupid decision, I do not end up censoring national news. The idea that owners like CBS will decide not to influence news coverage because, as rational actors, they don’t want to risk damaging their brands goes in the same category as believing that banks would never make risky loans so we can deregulate the subprime mortgage market.'

tales-of-the-sausage-factory.wetmachine.com

Jim

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To: axial who wrote (42071)1/19/2013 12:59:01 AM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 46820
 
Let's just hope the ESA puts enough English on that shot, and it doesn't backfire on us all!

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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (42073)1/19/2013 11:32:35 AM
From: axial
   of 46820
 
Yep. Or in the game of interplanetary billiards, that the object ball doesn't break into pieces with trajectories of their own. Not without risks, is it?

OTOH mankind spends trillions for weaponry on hair-trigger alerts, sufficient for total self-annihilation.

It's important that we protect ourselves from external threats, so we can maintain that ability ;)

Jim

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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (41934)1/19/2013 11:36:21 PM
From: Peter Ecclesine
2 Recommendations   of 46820
 
Report from IEEE 802 Vancouver, BC Jan 13-18 session
Attendance was 375+, the majority from Asia-Pacific

IEEE 802.11 323 voters
ieee802.org - homepage
ieee802.org - timelines
mentor.ieee.org - documents

802.11ac (Very High Throughput below 6 GHz) Draft 5.0 in the members area. Started Working Group Recirculation Ballot (WGRB) January 17th. Will request going to Sponsor Ballot out of March meeting.

802.11ad (Very High Throughput 60 GHz) was published Dec 28, 2012. It is available for $5 at techstreet techstreet.com|802_11ad_2012;product_id=1820568

802.11af Operation in TV White Spaces, an amendment to the 11ac Very High Throughput below 6 GHz radio resolved all comments and Draft 3.0 will enter WGLB next week. A 802.11af D2.0 prototype radio is being developed in Canada.

We expect 802.11ah Sub 1 Ghz Operation to similarly amend 11ac for small channels in unlicensed bands below 1 GHz. The 11ah specification framework is 802.11-11/1137r13
mentor.ieee.org

The revision of IEEE 802.11-2012 started with a draft including 802.11ae-2012 and 802.11aa-2012 standards.ieee.org and ~300 improvements to the standard. We will start Draft 1.0 Working Group Letter Ballot about February 8th.

802.11aj China Millimetre Wave is meeting bi-monthly in China going forward, starting week of January 20th.

802.11ak General Link ieee802.org and

802.11aq Pre-Association Discovery ieee802.org
held their first meetings.

The closing reports are in 11-12/1445r0
mentor.ieee.org

overview of regulatory activity involving 802.11, discussed January 17
mentor.ieee.org

802.11 position on FCC 12-118 TV bands repack and auction

mentor.ieee.org

802.11 position on FCC 12-148 3550-3650 MHz NPRM

mentor.ieee.org

OFCOM, CEPT and ETSI continue to develop the Harmonized Standard for Operation in TV white spaces EN 301 598 v0.0.13, and OFCOM closed their white spaces consultation
stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk

== 802.15 “Personal Area Networks” 125 voters

ieee802.org - homepage
mentor.ieee.org - documents

mentor.ieee.org

== 802.16 Broadband Wireless Access 42 voters

ieee802.org - homepage
mentor.ieee.org - documents

== 802.19 Coexistence Assurance Working Group 48 voters

ieee802.org - homepage
mentor.ieee.org - documents

== 802.22 Wireless Regional Area Networks 33 voters

ieee802.org - homepage
mentor.ieee.org - documents



802.22.1a - amendment for Advanced Beaconing, PAR and 5C, has begun work on 3550-3650 MHz beacon system allowing Navy ships to signal spectrum availability shoreward.



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To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (42075)1/20/2013 7:16:24 PM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 46820
 
Petere,

As always, much appreciated. Thanks.

FAC

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/21/2013 1:42:48 PM
   of 46820
 
'Standard Quantum Limit' Smashed <?>, Could Mean Better Fiber-Optic Comms
FiberOpticsOnline | January 10, 2013

Communicating with light may soon get a lot easier, hints recent research* from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland's Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), where scientists have potentially found a way to overcome a longstanding barrier to cleaner signals. The findings, which demonstrate for the first time an error rate far below the "standard quantum limit" for a wide range of light levels, could increase the efficiency of fiber-optic systems by reducing both the power needed to send a signal and the number of errors the receiver makes.

Light waves traveling through a fiber-optic cable often carry digital information encoded as differences in phase between one wave and another. The crests of two waves that are "in phase" pass a point at the same time, while if the two waves are 180 degrees out of phase, one crest passes while the other's trough does. Receivers can be designed to detect more than just two phase angles—0, 90, 180 and 270 degrees, for example—and the more phases they can detect, the more information can be packed into a signal, increasing the rate of data transmission. However, a constant problem is that phase states slightly overlap one another, meaning that there is a chance a state with 180-degree phase will be mistaken for a 0, 90 or 270-degree phase state. To minimize these errors, engineers must use more optical signal power—which amps up the cost as well.

A potential solution would be an improved receiver that does a better job distinguishing among the different phase states. But designers have struggled for decades to get past a barrier they call the standard quantum limit, which is the best performance an ideal conventional receiver could ever attain.

Cont.: fiberopticsonline.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/21/2013 1:52:47 PM
2 Recommendations   of 46820
 
Refactoring Consumer Electronics

By Bob Frankston | IEEE Xplore | January 2013

The consumer electronics (CE) business is in the throes of a wrenching change from business in which value is added through the use of sophisticated electronics to one in which information is the “secret sauce.” The new opportunity is interconnecting devices and information. But, as we will see, this puts the telecommunications business model at odds with the consumer electronics need for connectivity as a basic resource.

In the past, the industry’s use of connectivity has been viewed as a layer of added value. This is no longer true. This is because communications in the sense of exchanging meaning between devices is no longer communications in the sense of information confined to a channel. The Internet has made distance disappear in the sense that two devices can easily exchange bits even if they are literally a world apart.

Cont.: frankston.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/21/2013 5:55:41 PM
   of 46820
 
It might not get weirder than this

"Sophie, daughter of Google's Eric Schmidt, blogs their North Korea visit: http://t.co/p7sonJYP (interesting read)"

Hat tip: Jaap van till on the Cook Report on Internet Protocol

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/23/2013 9:24:10 AM
   of 46820
 
RFID System Helps Firms Track Workers
Luke Abaffy | ENR | 01/11/2013

enr.construction.com

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