SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology StocksThe *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum


Previous 10 Next 10 
From: Frank A. Coluccio1/23/2013 10:36:39 AM
   of 46820
 
WDM-PON x 2:
--
[1] COCONUT project to develop coherent ultra-dense WDM-PON
January 22, 2013 | Lightwave Staff

Abstract: “COCONUT” is a delightfully approximate acronym for “COst-effective COhereNt Ultra-dense-WDM-PON for lambda-To-the-user access networks.” The aim of the project is to define, study, and realize a fully scalable optical broadband access network that significantly extends the network dimensions in terms of bandwidth use, reach, and number of accommodated users. The envisioned access network technology evolves from the almost-commercial WDM-PON architecture to the realization of the ultra-dense WDM approaches, opening the way to the “wavelength-to-the-user” concept.

Complete: lightwaveonline.com
--

[2] Fujitsu, Motorola Mobility Announce Interoperable GPON-WDM Solution for the United States Department of Defense
Jan. 22, 2013 | Motorola

Joint Interoperability Test Command-certified platforms bring unparalleled security, reliability and efficiency to government customers
[...]
Motorola’s Passive Optical LAN (POL) greatly simplifies enterprise network deployment, operation and management. POL is based on proven GPON technology that delivers enhanced security, carrier-class reliability and significant power savings. Motorola’s POL solution also delivers tremendous cost savings, with up to a 55 percent reduction in capital and up to a 75 percent reduction in overall operational costs, for combined Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) savings of up to 65 percent over traditional LAN architectures.Fujitsu’s FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet ONP is a standards-based solution that integrates key advanced networking technologies including, centralized L2 switching, ROADM, and transmission up to 100G. The Fujitsu and Motorola platforms demonstrate data sharing with minimal latency or jitter effects.
[...]
The FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet ONP supports Connection-Oriented Ethernet (COE), ROADM and SONET/SDH. By combining circuit and packet-based switching into a single platform, government organizations can transition from a legacy infrastructure to a converged core that transports TDM alongside new GPON traffic. The simultaneous support for multiple traffic types allows government agencies to leverage existing technology investments while migrating to a next generation network infrastructure.

Complete: mediacenter.motorola.com

Hat tip: platdms

------

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (34114)1/23/2013 11:04:20 AM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 46820
 
KPN partners with Fon to expand Wi-Fi network
Wednesday 23 January 2013

Dutch operator KPN has partnered with Fon to roll out a network of Wi-Fi hotspots based on its customers' home broadband routers. The Wi-Fi routers of KPN subscribers will send out a second Wi-Fi signal, available for other KPN customers and Fon users. In return, KPN customers will have access to Fon's international network of almost 8 million hotspots.

KPN already has a network of 1,500 public hotspots, a number set to strongly increase with the new plan, the operator said. The Fon network will be tested over the next six months and launched at the end of this year. KPN's plan to expand Wi-Fi access follows a similar plan from rival Ziggo, which started testing in the city of Groningen last year a service opening up customer routers for Wi-Fi sharing.

Cont.: telecompaper.com

Hat tip: Jaap

------

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Frank A. Coluccio1/23/2013 11:33:14 AM
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
Belgium Plans to Store Wind Energy on Artificial Island
offshorewind.biz | Jan 18th, 2013

Belgium is on track to solve issues of storing surplus electricity generated from offshore wind by building an artificial island in the North Sea. It would be located 3 km off the coast near the town of Wenduine and built in shape of a doughnut, where excess energy would be stored by pumping water out of a hollow in the centre. The water would be let back in through turbines when power demand is higher than supply. Also, it would work as an offshore substation to transform the voltage of electricity generated from wind, Reuters writes. This plan was revealed on Wednesday at the port of Zeebrugge by Belgium’s North Sea Minister Johan VandeLanotte, whose spokeswoman is cited by Reuters as saying that this is a great solution for storing wind energy when there is not enough demand for the electricity.

Cont.: offshorewind.biz

From Reuters: reuters.com


fac: the sketch above aside, for a moment, what were once animated cartoons depicting metaphorically the principles of electricity, are now the blueprints of future energy solutions ...

------

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (42083)1/23/2013 12:07:28 PM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 46820
 
More of the same, hold the donuts ...

Google supports groundbreaking HVDC project
Barbara Vergetis Lundin | FierceSmartGrid | Jan 23 2013

Google is one sponsor supporting the development of the New Jersey Energy Link, the first offshore backbone electricity transmission system proposed in the United States. The project will improve the reliability of New Jersey's power grid, and help lower electricity prices by delivering both offshore wind and conventional electricity where and when it is needed. The next decade will see the three-phase development of Atlantic Wind Connection's New Jersey Energy Link -- an offshore electrical transmission cable, buried under the ocean, linking energy resources and users in northern, central and southern New Jersey.

Cont.: fiercesmartgrid.com

------

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Frank A. Coluccio1/23/2013 10:41:40 PM
   of 46820
 
PR: Huawei and Vodafone Complete World's First 2 Tbit/s WDM Field Trial

Shenzhen, China, 23th January, 2013

Huawei, a leading global information and communications technology solutions provider and Vodafone, one of the world’s largest mobile communications companies, today announced the successful trial of 2 Tbit/s optical fiber transmission technologies on Vodafone’s live network. The field trial achieved 2 Tbit/s transmission capabilities of over 3,325km. This provides a data highway capacity 20-times higher than current commercially deployed 100Gbit/s systems and has a speed equivalent to downloading 40 HD videos in one second. This marks an important step forward for optical transport technology advances beyond 100G.

Traffic on carrier backbone networks is growing exponentially, driving global momentum for commercial 100G deployments and attracting attention on optical transport beyond 100G. Riding on cutting-edge technologies such as flex oDSP, super SD-FEC, and flex modulation format, this field trial achieved a record-breaking transmission distance of 1500 km using a super-channel PDM-16QAM-based high spectral efficiency solution, and a second record-breaking transmission distance of 3325 km using a super-channel Nyquist PDM-QPSK-based ultra-long-haul solution. Both transmissions were on a link with G.652 fibers and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) without electrical regeneration. The link used in the trial was on Vodafone's backbone network, passing through a few cities across middle and south Germany.

"We are at the forefront of global 100G deployments, and have taken the lead in delivering key breakthroughs in technologies beyond 100G. Through collaboration with Vodafone and other leading international operators and customer-centric R&D, Huawei is always ready to build advanced optical networks for customers," said Jack Wang, president of Huawei's transport network product line.

To help customers optimize their overall technical architecture and adopt next generation transport networks, Huawei conducted the world's first 2T WDM field trial and pan-European 400G field trial in 2012, and also unveiled a series of scientific research achievements in optical transmission. According to Ovum, Huawei ranks No.1 in the WDM/OTN, 40G, 100G, and global optical network markets, as of Q3 2012.

huawei.com

------

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: axial1/24/2013 2:58:56 AM
   of 46820
 
The Inside Story Of Siri's Origins

' Thirty-five years after HAL’s big screen debut, turning the stuff of science fiction into fact fell to perhaps the only organization with a more outlandish imagination than a Lucas or Spielberg: the Defense Department. In 2003, the agency's investment arm, DARPA, tapped the non-profit research institute SRI International to lead a five-year, 500-person effort to build a virtual assistant, one the government hoped might yield software to help military commanders with both information overload and office chores. Although it wasn't the project's mission, this helper, the Cognitive Assistant that Learns and Organizes, or CALO, would ultimately provide the inspiration and model for Siri.

The Defense Department's financial backing, $150 million in all, united hundreds of top-tier artificial intelligence experts for an ambitious and uncertain endeavor that most corporate R&D labs could only dream of tackling: teaching computers to learn in the wild. The army of engineers at "nerd city" -- one SRI researcher's nickname for the lab -- were tasked with creating a PC-based helper smart enough to learn by observing a user's behavior, and all the people, projects and topics relevant to her work. The undertaking was “by any measure, the largest AI program in history,” says David Israel, one of the lead researchers on CALO.

[...] Virtual assistants had long proved a kind of siren song to an entire crew of Silicon Valley dreamers that wound up shipwrecked in pursuit of a more human, intelligent and helpful HAL. Over a decade earlier, in 1994, Wildfire Communications debuted a new telephone-based assistant, “Wildfire,” that could handle messages, place calls and retrieve voicemail in response to a prompt. Wildfire earned good reviews, but saw little pickup, despite the fact that “she” charmed users with sassy responses. A few years later, Microsoft Office’s assistant Clippy, an over-eager bouncing paperclip volunteering tips and shortcuts, launched to the chagrin of office workers everywhere. Eventually, Clippy made TIME’s list of 50 worst inventions. In 1998, General Magic’s Portico promised to connect the Internet and cell phones with a voice-controlled aide that could read emails and take messages, among other tasks. Within four years, the company shut down the assistant and filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

[...] But corporate politics have been unkind to Siri, and the endeavor's prospects may be jeopardized by its loss of many powerful advocates within Apple. Though Saffo, the Stanford professor and futurist, cautions deciphering Apple's inner workings is like "trying to understand North Korea," he ventures that Siri has become "an artificially-intelligent orphan" within the company. Only one of Siri’s three co-founders, Tom Gruber, remains at the company. Kittlaus left three weeks after Apple re-launched Siri in 2011, and Cheyer quit a year later. Apple's Forstall, who introduced Siri at its first keynote and oversaw the company's iOS software, was fired last year. Steve Jobs died the day after Siri debuted. And Luc Julia, who replaced Kittlaus as head of Siri, lasted just 10 months at Apple before leaving in 2012.

[...] “The future of virtual personal assistants is to make it so we don’t have to think so much and work so hard to do things that are possible,” says Kittlaus. “It’s less about survival and more about exploring the world.” Yet for all the efficiencies these do engines may provide, they may also carry a significant risk. Evan Selinger, a fellow at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, argues that less friction in our lives may "render us more vulnerable to being automatic," and eliminate crucial opportunities for moral deliberation. "The digital servant becomes the digital overlord, and we don’t even recognize it."

They might also make us an easy target for an algorithm that knows more about our bad habits and indulgences than we do, and isn't above exploiting them. The stream of suggestions from virtual assistants, especially if advertisers have a say, could make us more susceptible to overeating and over-spending. A spouse knows not to encourage you to stop by the steakhouse given your heart condition. But would Siri? Or Google Now if Google got a big ad buy from the steakhouse? Would Siri nag you into becoming your best self or would it coddle and humor you into a state of blissful complacency? By freeing us of the irritants and drudgeries of life that keep us from pursuing our more serious interests, the promise of virtual assistants offers a release into an inconceivably higher state of being. As the mathematician and philosopher Alfred North Whitehead observed, “Progress is measured by what you no longer have to think about.”

But progress toward what? That may be one of the few questions our assistants won’t be able to answer. '

huffingtonpost.com

Jim

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: axial who wrote (42086)1/24/2013 11:13:43 AM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 46820
 
[Half-jest] Why resort to robots and virtual personal assistants when there are cheaper ways to get results? For example, here's one possibility why companies located in China have lower operating costs. (View on a PC)

http://static.video.qq.com/TPout.swf?auto=1&vid=r010673xh67

I doubt the kid has a union card. But hey! Given the locale?

Hat tip: Ron T.

------

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)


To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (42087)1/24/2013 1:29:49 PM
From: Sultan
   of 46820
 
Amazing.. Cool kid..

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (42087)1/24/2013 1:45:56 PM
From: axial
   of 46820
 
Maybe quite young, but not so unusual. You'll find many farm kids doing the same here in North America.

Everything from a Bobcat or Kubota to a big Case. Aside from that, the ordinary Joe - not a child, but inexperienced nevertheless - can rent such equipment easily. Check it out.

---

On a tough job the difference between the men and the boys shows up quickly in efficiency and safety. Terrain, difficulty and tight limits, sequence of tasks can all add up to a money-losing proposition, though the equipment is easily operated. Even the best screw up: stuck, rolled, or broken-down from pushing equipment (especially hydraulic) past its limits. Co-workers hit by rotating buckets or unexpected movement.

So it's a fun video, but as you're aware ("half-jest") somewhat deceptive.

Jim

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Peter Ecclesine who wrote (42075)1/25/2013 4:13:00 PM
From: Peter Ecclesine
   of 46820
 
Today the NTIA responded to Congress mandate to study sharing the 5 GHz bands

ntia.doc.gov

The report concludes that further analysis will be required to determine whether and how the identified risk factors can be mitigated through, for example, the promulgation of new safeguards in addition to the FCC’s existing requirements. Accordingly, NTIA, in collaboration with the federal and industry stakeholders and the FCC, will conduct quantitative analysis of potential mitigation requirements in connection with regulatory proceedings. In the next phase of its assessments, NTIA will lead detailed quantitative studies described more fully in this report, which will include additional analysis and measurements to evaluate the feasibility of existing, modified, proposed and new spectrum-sharing technologies and approaches. These studies will be supported by and involve direct interaction between federal and non-federal stakeholders, including representatives of the wireless industry and the intelligent transportation community. In addition, NTIA, the FCC, the State Department and the other affected federal agencies will continue to work cooperatively with industry representatives and international partners to fully assess various sharing scenarios in these bands and to address the international dimensions and ramifications of these issues.


Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)
Previous 10 Next 10