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   Technology StocksThe *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum


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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/17/2013 11:33:41 AM
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Intel Develops Silicon Photonics for Disaggregated, Rack-Scale Servers
January 16, 2013 | ConvergeDigest



Intel is working with Facebook and the Open Compute Project to develop silicon photonic connectivity for the next generation of disaggregated server racks combing compute, storage and networking resources. At the Open Compute Summit in Santa Clara, the companies also unveiled a mechanical prototype built by Quanta Computer that includes distributed input/output (I/O) using Intel Ethernet switch silicon.

Cont.: convergedigest.com

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To: russet who wrote (42060)1/17/2013 2:31:40 PM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
Hi russet.

re: "3D Printers Can Now Pump Out 30-Round Magazines"
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Another example of disintermediation at work. Poor gun store owner (for starters). What will widespread 3D printing do to market dynamics? Interesting.

A friend once related to me how he once sent his ten year-old niece a birthday gift cross-country by emailing her a gift certificate for a specific doll that was all the craze. I'll bet he never thought he'd one day be able to achieve the same end by simply emailing an AMF file. Then again, maybe he did.

FAC

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/17/2013 3:46:04 PM
2 Recommendations   of 46820
 
Netflix CDN v. The Cable Guys or "Comcast v. Level 3 Part Deux -- Peering Payback!"
By Harold Feld | January 17, 2013
Few things make me experience the bitter joy of Cassandrafreude more than watching someone flip the other guy’s argument. So it is with Netflix and Time Warner Cable, and their current beef over Netflix making its new uber-HD content available to ISPs for free, but only through Netflix’s content delivery network (CDN). TWC accuses Netflix of demanding "unprecedented" access and privileges for its own (i.e., Netflix's, not TWC's) content. (Although ESPN360 actually went so far as to charge ISPs on a per subscriber basis some years back, which strikes me as a little more extreme than just saying "use my CDN," but lets not quible on this point.)

Cont.: publicknowledge.org

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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (42063)1/17/2013 5:16:54 PM
From: Win-Lose-Draw
   of 46820
 
That's interesting. I read a few "consumer" facing articles this morning about how some of the big cablecos were - for some inscrutable reason - unable to provide this "SuperHD" functionality. This was causing confusion amongst consumers who didn't really know what to think.

That article (assuming it's at least vaguely correct) answers the question...

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From: axial1/17/2013 7:16:29 PM
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Fractal human behavior:

Facebook Concept Used by 16th Century Scholars

' Professor Jane Everson, Principal-investigator, said: "Just as we create user names for our profiles on Facebook and Twitter and create circles of friends on Google plus, these scholars created nicknames, shared -- and commented on -- topical ideas, the news of the day, and exchanged poems, plays and music. "It may have taken a little longer for this to be shared without the internet, but through the creation of yearbooks and volumes of letters and speeches, they shared the information of the day." '

sciencedaily.com

Jim

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To: axial who wrote (42065)1/17/2013 9:12:45 PM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
   of 46820
 
A very interesting find, Jim. Perusing the Web further, I discovered this:


sci-news.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/18/2013 12:31:55 AM
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INFRASTRUCTURE: Low Water Slowing River Traffic on the Mississippi

Extraordinarily low water levels in the channel of the Mississippi River have complicated barge service and forced companies that supply, deliver and use aggregate and other barge-delivered construction materials to look for alternative methods, sources at those companies say.

Full Story | Slide Show

app.marketing.construction.com
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fac: I receive the print version gratis; I see now that ENR's Web features require a monthly subscription... hmphh!

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From: Frank A. Coluccio1/18/2013 10:44:01 AM
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Storm Surge: An Interview With Climate Change Expert Klaus Jacob On NYC's Post-Sandy Future:

Columbia University geophysicist Klaus Jacob has been warning about how vulnerable New York City is to violent weather for years and, more importantly in his view, how climate change and rising sea levels will transform the shape and character of the metropolis.

By Sarah Crean | Gotham Gazette | January 18, 2013

news.gothamgazette.com;
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fac: while reading this story I was reminded numerous times of the warnings that were aired in advance of other recent, far-reaching calamities ...

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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (42068)1/18/2013 12:23:00 PM
From: axial
   of 46820
 
Frank, in NY and globally there'll eventually be a realization: spending $500 billion subsidizing relocation is preferable to spending that sum on temporary fixes.

We spoke of this years ago re: New Orleans, Florida and Texas.

The question: How long before people understand that, and spending becomes rational? Understood, there's tremendous resistance to relocation. But at least the money only gets spent once.

It would require a hybrid program, mixing cost-effective and immediate protective measures with a long-term migration strategy. Individual compliance would necessarily be voluntary, with the explicit understanding that staying waives all rights to public spending and assistance.

This is gonna be quite a century ;)

Jim

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To: Frank A. Coluccio who wrote (41995)1/18/2013 6:15:01 PM
From: axial
   of 46820
 
[Germany] Power Play: Politician Calls for Nationalization of Electricity Grid

' Green Energy Needs to Find Its Way to the Grid

In the future, a large share of electricity in Germany will no longer be generated in power plants near major metropolitan areas. Instead, the electricity will come from solar and biogas plants, as well as offshore wind farms, mostly in the North Sea and Baltic Sea. The goal is to generate clean, green energy and supply it to large parts of the country. The only problem is that the German electricity grid isn't ready to be connected to the wind farms and transport energy to southern Germany.

According to the current plans approved by the federal government, in the coming years the four grid operators in Germany are to build 1,550 kilometers (963 miles) of high-voltage power lines, including several direct-current transmission lines from north to south. At the same time, dozens of wind farms will have to be connected to the terrestrial power grid through new underwater cables that will cost billions to install. These measures, say the environment and economics ministers, as well as industry representatives, must be "tackled immediately" if the prestigious Energiewende project is to succeed within the foreseeable future. But the steps taken to date are nothing short of paltry. '

spiegel.de

Jim

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