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   Technology StocksThe *NEW* Frank Coluccio Technology Forum


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To: Win-Lose-Draw who wrote (41290)8/15/2012 9:19:12 PM
From: LindyBill
   of 46820
 
We have no expectation of privacy when we are out and about. But I don't like the idea that the police know where I am at all the time. And this is just the start of it.

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To: pltodms who wrote (41287)8/16/2012 1:34:32 AM
From: axial
   of 46820
 
Hi Plato - 'There oughta be a law.' Who says?

'According to Albert Einstein: "The most incomprehensible thing about the universe, is that it is comprehensible." - While it does not appear all that comprehensible to me, it certainly seems surprising that the laws of physics are as simple and straightforward as they are, even when they are at odds with our intuition. When you think about it: is it not surprising that there should be any laws of physics?'



zenker.se

Jim ;)

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From: Frank A. Coluccio8/16/2012 9:36:42 AM
   of 46820
 
Builders and Architects Quibble over $20 MM Locker Room Measurement Stakes
--

Slide show: One World Trade Center’s Skinny Spire Redesign Might Not Measure Up

August 15, 2012






Image courtesy Port Authority of New York & New Jersey

archrecord.construction.com

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From: Cautious_Optimist8/16/2012 9:47:00 AM
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
News

Major Advance Made In Generating Electricity From Wastewater August 13, 2012

Engineers at Oregon State University have made a breakthrough in the performance of microbial fuel cells that can produce electricity directly from wastewater, opening the door to a future in which waste treatment plants not only will power themselves, but will sell excess electricity.

The new technology developed at OSU can now produce 10 to 50 more times the electricity, per volume, than most other approaches using microbial fuel cells, and 100 times more electricity than some.

Researchers say this could eventually change the way that wastewater is treated all over the world, replacing the widely used “activated sludge” process that has been in use for almost a century. The new approach would produce significant amounts of electricity while effectively cleaning the wastewater.

The findings have just been published in Energy and Environmental Science, a professional journal, in work funded by the National Science Foundation.

“If this technology works on a commercial scale the way we believe it will, the treatment of wastewater could be a huge energy producer, not a huge energy cost,” said Hong Liu, an associate professor in the OSU Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering. “This could have an impact around the world, save a great deal of money, provide better water treatment and promote energy sustainability.”

Experts estimate that about 3 percent of the electrical energy consumed in the United States and other developed countries is used to treat wastewater, and a majority of that electricity is produced by fossil fuels that contribute to global warming.

But the biodegradable characteristics of wastewater, if tapped to their full potential, could theoretically provide many times the energy that is now being used to process them, with no additional greenhouse emissions.

OSU researchers reported several years ago on the promise of this technology, but at that time the systems in use produced far less electrical power. With new concepts – reduced anode-cathode spacing, evolved microbes and new separator materials – the technology can now produce more than two kilowatts per cubic meter of liquid reactor volume. This amount of power density far exceeds anything else done with microbial fuel cells.

The system also works better than an alternative approach to creating electricity from wastewater, based on anaerobic digestion that produces methane. It treats the wastewater more effectively, and doesn’t have any of the environmental drawbacks of that technology, such as production of unwanted hydrogen sulfide or possible release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

The OSU system has now been proven at a substantial scale in the laboratory, Liu said, and the next step would be a pilot study. Funding is now being sought for such a test. A good candidate, she said, might initially be a food processing plant, which is a contained system that produces a steady supply of certain types of wastewater that would provide significant amounts of electricity.

Continued research should also find even more optimal use of necessary microbes, reduced material costs and improved function of the technology at commercial scales, OSU scientists said.

Once advances are made to reduce high initial costs, researchers estimate that the capital construction costs of this new technology should be comparable to that of the activated sludge systems now in widespread use today – and even less expensive when future sales of excess electricity are factored in.

This technology cleans sewage by a very different approach than the aerobic bacteria used in the past. Bacteria oxidize the organic matter and, in the process, produce electrons that run from the anode to the cathode within the fuel cell, creating an electrical current. Almost any type of organic waste material can be used to produce electricity – not only wastewater, but also grass straw, animal waste, and byproducts from such operations as the wine, beer or dairy industries.

The approach may also have special value in developing nations, where access to electricity is limited and sewage treatment at remote sites is difficult or impossible as a result.

The ability of microbes to produce electricity has been known for decades, but only recently have technological advances made their production of electricity high enough to be of commercial use.

About the OSU College of Engineering
The OSU College of Engineering is among the nation’s largest and most productive engineering programs. In the past six years, the College has more than doubled its research expenditures to $27.5M by emphasizing highly collaborative research that solves global problems, spins out new companies, and produces opportunity for students through hands-on learning.

SOURCE: Oregon State University

http://www.wateronline.com/doc.mvc/major-advance-made-generating-electricity-from-wastewater-0001

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To: Cautious_Optimist who wrote (41295)8/16/2012 10:16:28 AM
From: Frank A. Coluccio
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
Thanks, Cautious. Interesting find. It recalls one of those sometimes-scrutinized and -criticized experimental areas that NASA's been exploring since the Sixties, which appears now to be yielding fruit here on Earth. More recently this research has received attention in relation to Martian exploration, as described in this recent item from Wired:
--

NASA Wants to Power Robots With Microbes
By Wired UK Email Author January 4, 2012



By Mark Brown, Wired UK

For NASA’s Martian rovers, it seems that bigger is better. The $2.5 billion (£1.6 billion) Curiosity — which is currently whizzing towards the red planet following its November 2011 launch — is five times bigger than twin predecessors Spirit and Opportunity.
[...]
Microbial fuel cells harness the metabolic processes of bacteria, sending harvested electrons through an anode-cathode-resistor circuit to generate electricity. The advantages are that bacteria can be squashed into a battery with high energy density compared to traditional lithium-ion power sources, and the ability of microorganisms to reproduce acts like a natural battery charger. [!!]
[...]

Complete: wired.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio8/16/2012 11:02:17 AM
   of 46820
 
PR: IBM and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Begin First Production At New York's Latest Semiconductor Fab

First products from Fab 8 developed and manufactured in New York's 'Tech Valley'

Saratoga County, N.Y., Jan. 10, 2012

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced an agreement to jointly manufacture advanced computer chips at both companies' semiconductor fabs in New York's "Tech Valley." The new products recently began initial production at IBM's 300mm fab in East Fishkill and GLOBALFOUNDRIES' Fab 8 in Saratoga County, and are planned to ramp to volume production in the second half of 2012. The chips are the first silicon produced at GLOBALFOUNDRIES' newest and most advanced manufacturing facility.



Complete: globalfoundries.com

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From: pltodms8/16/2012 9:50:01 PM
   of 46820
 
New system could predict solar flares, give advance warning to help protect power grids
Published 16 August 2012

Researchers may have discovered a new method to predict solar flares more than a day before they occur, providing advance warning to help protect satellites, power grids, and astronauts from potentially dangerous radiation

homelandsecuritynewswire.com

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From: pltodms8/16/2012 9:58:10 PM
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
Water shortages water treatment | Homeland Security News Wire


Depending on the depth of the drilling, it can take anywhere from two gallons to two million gallons of water to frack one well; drilling companies consume enough water in their fracking operations to meet the needs of between 66,400 and 118,000 households; in the parched Midwest, farmers raise questions about water-use priorities

homelandsecuritynewswire.com

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From: Frank A. Coluccio8/17/2012 2:08:02 AM
   of 46820
 
Wi-Fi is killing mobile advertising
August 13, 2012 | TelecomAsia

Operators are increasingly enthusiastic about the prospects of Wi-Fi offload in their 4G roadmaps. But that’s going to be bad news for mobile advertising – at least until Facebook steps in to save the day.

That’s according to Shawn Scheuer, co-founder and CEO of mobile advertising network Moolah Media, who says that data from Moolah in May and June 2012 shows that conversion rates across “thousands of lead generation campaigns and over 100 million clicks” varied between 11.5% and 3.9% when ads were served over carrier networks, but just 0.6% for ads served via Wi-Fi connections.

The problem is that when users connect via Wi-Fi, it’s impossible to use targeting information like their wireless carrier to send more relevant ads to mobile users, Scheuer wrote in an op-ed for All ThingsD:

A mobile user’s carrier reveals a lot about who they are and how they might interact with an ad – information that’s essential for an ad to reach its target audience and to ultimately be profitable. Even the most basic facts are important: If an ad requires a credit card purchase, it makes sense to target users on a monthly billing cycle rather than those on prepaid carriers who may not have credit.

Cont.: telecomasia.net

Hat tip: Rob Powell @ telecomramblings.com

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From: pltodms8/17/2012 9:43:37 AM
1 Recommendation   of 46820
 
A fresh chapter for organic data storage

A book complete with illustrations has been encoded in DNA.

Monya Baker
16 August 2012
nature.com

“It's using some simple ideas in very elegant ways to improve the density of information that one can store,” says Condon. She says that the technology will work best for specialized applications in which data need to be stored for a long time without being read.

The ideal storage period might be as long as centuries, says Kosuri. Even as other storage technologies become as obsolete as magnetic tape and floppy disks are now, researchers will always be trying to improve technology for reading and writing DNA, because the molecule is so central to biology.

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