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   PastimesClown-Free Zone... sorry, no clowns allowed


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To: Terry Maloney who wrote (434235)12/2/2019 7:36:51 PM
From: Broken_Clock
   of 435302
 
Halfway to fascism? More than say, FDR, who stole property form citizens of Japanese ancestry then interned them in desolate barbed wire camps unless they chose to die as cannon fodder in the 442nd?

Or Truman who nuked two cities in Japan just see if the nuke worked well?

Or Eisenhower who grew the CIA multi-headed monster?

Or Nixon, Ford, LBJ, ad nauseum all the way to Trump?

It was Obama keeping Latino kids in cages and yet the left blamed Trump.

Trump is no better or no worse than any President in my lifetime.

Only Kennedy didn't have enough time in office to screw up too badly.

Trump is sending troops to Saudi Arabia....where's the outrage on that score? It doesn't exist.

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To: Broken_Clock who wrote (434243)12/3/2019 9:21:02 AM
From: Terry Maloney
   of 435302
 
They've all been imperialists, more or less, but I don't recall the others openly embracing their inner brownshirt the way Trump does.

But if you can't see that, fine, enjoy his rallies.

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To: Rarebird who wrote (434236)12/4/2019 8:55:18 AM
From: Terry Maloney
   of 435302
 
Good game last night. <g>

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To: ggersh who wrote (434242)12/6/2019 8:28:19 AM
From: Terry Maloney
   of 435302
 
Watched both games. They are good. And yes, they are dirty ...

ca.sports.yahoo.com

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To: Terry Maloney who wrote (434246)12/6/2019 9:05:23 AM
From: ggersh
   of 435302
 
POS should get 10 games for that if not more
their shouldn't be any place for that shit in the game

Player safety is a total joke along w/Bettman

Hoping Kotkaniemi is going to be alright

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To: ggersh who wrote (434247)12/6/2019 10:00:18 AM
From: Terry Maloney
   of 435302
 
Yeah, 10 games sounds about right. It was a dirty hit for sure.

Kotkaniemi's lucky he didn't break his neck, but it seems it's 'only' a concussion.

And don't get me started on Bettman ... <g/ng>

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To: Terry Maloney who wrote (434245)12/6/2019 12:32:26 PM
From: Rarebird
   of 435302
 
I heard the Isle's played their worst game of the season Tuesday night. Surely, that had nothing to do with the way Montreal was playing. -g-. After an 11 game winless streak, the hockey gods threw Montreal a bone. -g-

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To: Rarebird who wrote (434249)12/6/2019 2:24:37 PM
From: Terry Maloney
   of 435302
 
Sure ... <g>

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From: Broken_Clock12/11/2019 7:06:54 PM
3 Recommendations   of 435302
 
Chris Hedges....one of my all time favorite journalists
truthdig.com


Dec 09, 2019 Opinion | TD originals
The Great American Shakedown

The Democratic Party and its liberal supporters are perplexed. They presented hours of evidence of an impeachable offense, although they studiously avoided charging Donald Trump with impeachable offenses also carried out by Democratic presidents, including the continuation or expansion of presidential wars not declared by Congress, exercising line-item veto power, playing prosecutor, judge, jury and executioner to kill individuals, including U.S. citizens, anywhere on the planet, violating due process and misusing executive orders. Because civics is no longer taught in most American schools, they devoted a day to constitutional scholars who provided the Civics 101 case for impeachment. The liberal press, cheerleading the impeachment process, saturated the media landscape with live coverage, interminable analysis, constant character assassination of Trump and giddy speculation. And yet, it has made no difference. Public opinion remains largely unaffected.

Perhaps, supporters of impeachment argue, they failed to adopt the right technique. Perhaps journalists, by giving voice to opponents of impeachment—who do indeed live in a world not based in fact—created a false equivalency between truth and lies. Maybe, as Bill Grueskin, a professor at the Columbia University Journalism School, writes, impeachment advocates should spend $1 million to produce a kind of movie trailer for all those who did not sit through the hours of hearings, to “boil down the essentials of the film” and provide “a quick but intense insight into the characters, setting the scene with vivid imagery—to entice people to come back to the theatre a month later for the full movie.” Or perhaps they need to keep pounding away at Trump until his walls of support crumble.

The liberal class and the Democratic Party leadership have failed, even after their defeat in the 2016 presidential election, to understand that they, along with the traditional Republican elites, have squandered their credibility. No one believes them. And no one should.

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To: Rarebird who wrote (434249)12/19/2019 12:35:11 PM
From: Broken_Clock
   of 435302
 
RB
Your worst fears for the D's chances against Trump are being realized.
The ill conceived impeachment debacle may be the cherry on the D cake. I read this week that trump recently added 600,000 new donors to his reelection campaign. R's are crushing the D's in campaign contributions.

“Let Them Impeach And Be Damned”: History Repeats Itself With A Vengeance As The House Impeaches Donald Trump





Below is my column in the Hill newspaper on the striking similarities between the Johnson and Trump impeachments — a comparison that should be unsettling for most voters as history repeats itself with a vengeance.

Here is the column:

“Let them impeach and be damned.” Those words could have easily come from Donald Trump, as the House moves this week to impeach him. They were, however, the words of another president who not only shares some striking similarities to Trump but who went through an impeachment with chilling parallels to the current proceedings. The impeachment of Trump is not just history repeating itself but repeating itself with a vengeance.

The closest of the three prior presidential impeachment cases to the House effort today is the 1868 impeachment of Andrew Johnson. This is certainly not a comparison that Democrats should relish. The Johnson case has long been widely regarded as the very prototype of an abusive impeachment. As in the case of Trump, calls to impeach Johnson began almost as soon as he took office. A southerner who ascended to power after the Civil War as a result of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Johnson was called the “accidental president” and his legitimacy was never accepted by critics. Representative John Farnsworth of Illinois called Johnson an “ungrateful, despicable, besotted, traitorous man.”

Johnson opposed much of the reconstruction plan Lincoln had for the defeated south and was criticized for fueling racial divisions. He was widely viewed as an alcoholic and racist liar who opposed full citizenship for freed slaves. Ridiculed for not being able to spell, Johnson responded, “It is a damn poor mind that can only think of one way to spell a word.” Sound familiar? The “Radical Republicans” in Congress started to lay a trap a year before impeachment. They were aware that Johnson wanted their ally, War Secretary Edwin Stanton, out of his cabinet, so they then decided to pass an unconstitutional law that made his firing a crime.



To leave no doubt of their intentions, they even defined such a firing as a “high misdemeanor.” It was a trap door crime created for the purposes of impeachment. Undeterred, Johnson fired Stanton anyway. His foes then set upon any member of Congress or commentator who dared question the basis for the impeachment. His leading opponent, Representative Thaddeus Stevens of Pennsylvania demanded of them, “What good did your moderation do you? If you do not kill the beast, it will kill you.”



As with Trump, the Johnson impeachment was a fast and narrow effort. On paper, his was even faster, since Johnson was impeached just days after the approval of an inquiry. But the underlying investigation began more than a year earlier and was actually the fourth such effort. Yet it also was largely based on the single act of firing Stanton. It collapsed in the Senate due to seven courageous Republicans who voted to acquit a president they despised. One of them, Edmund Ross of Kansas, said that voting for Johnson was like looking down into his open grave. Ross then jumped because he felt his oath to the Constitution gave him no alternative.

The Trump impeachment is even weaker than the Johnson impeachment, which had an accepted criminal act as its foundation. This will be the first presidential impeachment to go forward without such a recognized crime but, like the Johnson impeachment, it has a manufactured and artificial construct. The Trump impeachment also marks the fastest impeachment of all time, depending on how you count the days in the Johnson case.

Take the obstruction of Congress article. I have strongly encouraged the House to abandon the arbitrary deadline of impeaching Trump before Christmas and to take a couple more months to build a more complete record and to allow judicial review of the underlying objections of the Trump administration. But Democrats have set a virtual rocket docket schedule and will impeach Trump for not turning over witnesses and documents in that short period even though he is in court challenging congressional demands. Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton both were able to go to court to challenge demands for testimony and documents. The resulting judicial opinions proved critical to the outcome of the cases.

Under the theory of the House, members can set any ridiculously short period and then impeach a president who, like Trump has done, seeks judicial review over claims of executive privileges and immunities. It is another trap door impeachment. Democrats did subpoena documents until October but have not issued any subpoenas for critical witnesses such as John Bolton. They did not hold a vote for an inquiry until the end of October. They set a vote for December to manufacture a time crush.

The same is true with the abuse of power article. I testified that the House had a legitimate reason to investigate this allegation and, if there was a showing of a quid pro quo, could impeach Trump for it. Democrats called highly compelling witnesses who said they believed such a quid pro quo existed, but the record is conflicted. There is no statement of a quid pro quo in the conversations between Trump and the Ukrainians, and White House aides have denied being given such a demand. Trump declared during two direct conversations, with Republican Senator Ron Johnson and Ambassador Gordon Sondland, that there was no quid pro quo.

One can question the veracity of his statement, as he likely knew of the whistleblower at the time of the calls. But there is no direct statement in the record by Trump to the contrary. Democrats and their witnesses have instead insisted that the impeachment can be proven by inferences or presumptions. The problem is that there still are a significant number of witnesses who likely have direct evidence, but the House has refused to go to court to compel their appearance. The House will therefore move forward with an impeachment that seems designed to fail in the Senate, as if that is a better option than taking the time to build a complete case.

With half of the country opposing impeachment, the House is about to approve two articles of impeachment designed to play better On CNN than in the Senate. Meanwhile, a lack of tolerance for constitutional objections is growing by the day. Some critics have actually cited Johnson as precedent to show that impeachment can be done on purely political grounds. In other words, the very reason the Johnson impeachment is condemned by history is now being used today as a justification to dispense with standards and definitions of impeachable acts. One commentator has embraced the use of Johnson as precedent with a statement that might make every “Radical Republican” from the 19th century smile, saying, “At least they impeached the motherf—-r.”

Indeed, many Democrats seem to be taking away the wrong lesson on impeachment from Johnson himself, who declared, “Whenever you hear a man prating about the Constitution, spot him as a traitor.” This is how history not only repeats itself, but repeats itself with a vengeance.

Jonathan Turley is the chair of public interest law at George Washington University and served as the last lead counsel in a Senate impeachment trial. He testified as a Republican witness in House Judiciary Committee hearing in the Trump impeachment inquiry. Follow him @JonathanTurley.

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