SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology StocksTivo (TIVO) Interactive TV


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: TimF who wrote (2060)11/17/2010 10:01:37 PM
From: i-node
   of 2093
 
After 3 yrs with the cable company's crappy DVR I finally moved back to TIVO a couple weeks ago.

It is such a better product. Since I tend to invest in companies selling products I like, I had a look at their financial statements for the first time in a few years, too.

OMG. Talk about a train wreck.

I would think someone could turn this company into something.

Maybe a government bailout is order.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: i-node who wrote (2063)11/18/2010 11:20:48 AM
From: TimF
   of 2093
 
Is the ‘Free’ DVR TiVo’s Last Stand?
By Ryan Lawler Nov. 15, 2010, 9:45am PDT 3 Comments

What do you do when you’re a consumer electronics company that depends on subscription revenue and you’re hemorrhaging subscribers? If you’re TiVo, you give your product away for free and raise your subscription rates, hoping to make up for lost sales over the course of a two-year contract.

TiVo, which was once synonymous with the DVR, has seen its subscriber numbers plummet over the last several years as cable companies have undercut its products by leasing DVR boxes of their own to subscribers. The company lost 666,000 subscribers over the past year, or nearly a quarter of its user base.

To combat further subscriber losses, TiVo announced special holiday pricing today, aimed at getting consumers excited once again about owning one of its DVRs, as opposed to leasing one from their cable provider. For the next six weeks — and possibly longer — TiVo will be selling its Premiere DVR for just $99, which is $200 off the usual retail price of $299. But that price comes with a hitch: rather than pay the usual $12.95 monthly service fee, TiVo requires purchasers of the $99 Premiere DVR to pay $19.99 a month for a one year contract. But that’s not the only special promotion TiVo is pushing; sign a contract for two years of service at the inflated rate; and you get a Premiere DVR for free.

The problem with these promotions, as pointed out by the Washington Post, is that they’re not always a good deal for consumers. Getting a TiVo DVR for $99 might seem like good for the first year, but if you continue to shell out $19.99 for three years of service, you’re actually paying more than if you bought your DVR for the non-discounted rate. WaPo runs the math:

TiVo normally sells its Premiere DVR for $299.99 and charges $12.95 a month for service. That yields a total one-year cost of $455.39. After two years, you’ll have spent $610.79; after three, $766.19. If you take the $99.99 offer, your expenses hit $339.87 after one year, $579.75 after two and $819.63 after three.

You’ll do better under another, non-XL offer that TiVo doesn’t mention on its home or product-information pages: Pay nothing for a Premiere in return for committing to two years of $19.99-a-month payments (after which the $19.99 rate remains bolted to the DVR). Under this offer, you’d pay $239.88 after one year, $479.76 after two and $719.64 after three.

It might be difficult for TiVo to convince consumers to pay a higher monthly fee and sign a one- or two-year contract for DVR service when they can already lease a similar box from their cable or satellite provider for less than what TiVo is asking. While most cable DVRs don’t offer nearly as many features or flexibility as what TiVo has put together with its Premiere box, for many cable subscribers, what Comcast or Time Warner Cable has to offer is good enough.

gigaom.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: TimF who wrote (2060)11/18/2010 11:25:42 AM
From: TimF
   of 2093
 
The New DirecTV TiVo Is Still Delayed (2011)
Filed by Dave Zatz under Satellite TV, TiVo

Not that you had any doubts after seeing the beta correspondence and executive comments, and I don’t want to beat a dead horse. However, I did notice TiVo has updated their website to reflect that a 2010 DirecTV TiVo launch is off the table.

Earlier last week (below):

TiVo and DIRECTV have renewed their partnership, which means a new HD DIRECTV DVR featuring the Emmy® award-winning TiVo service is expected to launch to support satellite customers in 2010.

Later last week (above):

TiVo and DIRECTV have renewed their partnership, which means a new HD DIRECTV DVR featuring the Emmy® award-winning TiVo service is expected to launch to support satellite customers in the future.

Additionally, DirecTV.com now states:

We expect the new receiver to launch in early 2011 and we will provide more information as soon as it is available.

9 Responses for "The New DirecTV TiVo Is Still Delayed (2011)"

1. Dave Zatz October 3rd, 2010 at 9:23 am

Yes, I’ve obsessively been refreshing that web page pretty regularly, anticipating this sort of update.

Also, if I were a TiVo investor I might be a little bit miffed. While TiVo isn’t material to DirecTV’s business, TiVo’s relationship with DirecTV is highly material to theirs. Given the timing, I find it unlikely TiVo was not aware that they possibly couldn’t get it done in 2010 when discussing their quarterly earnings in late August. They didn’t outright lie given their new, vague phraseology (as opposed to the earlier, specific “2010? declarations), but their comments could appear misleading assuming they knew the unlikeliness of launching this year.

“our plan remains to launch DIRECTV by year end”
“we hope to be able to push out late this year”

zatznotfunny.com

Edited - Left old link (below) but replacing quoted content with a newer post (above).

Delayed DirecTV TiVo Manufacturer Revealed
Filed by Dave Zatz under Satellite TV, TiVo

zatznotfunny.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: TimF who wrote (2064)11/18/2010 11:38:36 AM
From: i-node
   of 2093
 
When the cable guy came to install the cable card in my new one, I said, "Gosh, bet you don't see many TIVOs these days". He said, "Actually, we're seeing more of them. Everyone wants them for Netflix".

And I have to tell you, the Netflix capability is attractive. We have a Netflix DVD we've been sitting on for 3 months. But streaming movies on TIVO is convenient, and works well. With Netflix having expanded its streaming content, I wouldn't be surprised to see a boost. Except for this $20/month thing.

There has been some complaining about the $20/month arrangement because it would appear that although they haven't done so yet, the game plan is to raise prices to $20/month. That big a jump is dangerous to their business plan. They might go to $15/month without a lot of complaining, but $20? I'm not sure.

The real play, of course, is Netflix, which promises to save as much in postage as the increased streaming content is costing them, over time.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Road Walker who wrote (2062)11/18/2010 11:45:14 AM
From: TimF
1 Recommendation   of 2093
 
TiVo v. EchoStar: En Banc Summary

In 2006, a jury found that EchoStar willfully infringed a critical TiVo patent. The federal judge who presided over the trial issued an injunction barring EchoStar from further infringement and requiring disablement of DVRs already placed with EchoStar subscribers. On EchoStar's first appeal, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the jury's verdict with respect to the software claims of the patent, and EchoStar did not challenge the terms of the injunction. EchoStar then claimed, however, that it had created new, non-infringing DVR software (the “work around”), and thus did not need to disable any of its DVRs. In 2009, the trial judge found that EchoStar’s work around was still infringing and had violated the court's injunction. Earlier this year, a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals upheld that decision. The case is now pending, at the request of EchoStar, before the full ("en banc") Federal Circuit, where it will be argued on November 9th before all the Federal Circuit judges. As TiVo has argued in its brief to the full court, the case is important to the entire patent system because judges must have the authority to enforce their orders in patent cases. Otherwise, determined infringers will be able to force innovative companies -- and the investors, suppliers, customers, and commercial partners who respect and rely on their patents -- into an endless game of litigation cat-and-mouse.

investor.tivo.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: TimF11/18/2010 11:49:59 AM
   of 2093
 
TiVo Releases Online Season Pass Manager
Filed by Dave Zatz under TiVo, Web

Later today, TiVo subscribers will gain the ability to re-order, transfer, or delete their Season Passes online at www.tivo.com/spm. Which is quite powerful when combined with the pre-existing web scheduling capabilities and To Do List functionality. This may seem like a minor feature, and perhaps it is in the grander scheme, but I can tell you it’s infinitely more efficient and practical to handle these tasks via computer than remote.

In addition to effectively segregating his and hers DVRs, as we have above, the new online Season Pass manager is also good for quickly cleaning up shows you’re no longer interested in (or the networks have removed for you). And it should even allow you to migrate all your Season Passes to a new TiVo – assuming they’re simultaneously active for a time.

Deleting and copying Season Passes is pretty straight forward. Check the shows, click the button. Reprioritization is done via some slick AJAXy drag and drop functionality. While I’ve had access to the feature for a few days, I haven’t actually been home to track how quickly changes are propagated from the cloud down to our actual TiVo hardware. However, I’m told it should happen in under 15 minutes. And, in some cases, Season Pass modifications may even appear near instantaneously.

To address some concerns that have cropped up in the forums… No, this is not solely limited to Premiere hardware. And, yes, it’s not quite the whole home (automated) cooperative scheduling many of us have been pining for. But it’s a solid start. (Plus, in my case, cooperative schedule may not help much – we attempt to record “must have” shows on both TiVo units as our Cisco tuning adapters regularly flake out.)

zatznotfunny.com

Chucky October 13th, 2010 at 11:20 am

“If you have a THD or S3, there may not be enough reason to upgrade now unless you can get a good deal (like some of the one Electronics Expo has run – ~$150).”

I’d happily pay the full retail price on a Premiere to replace my THD if TiVo would go ahead and make it easy for the 3rd party community to create free tools to swap hard drives.

(I’d run the classic UI, but I could make excellent use of the better performance and larger capacity of the Premiere. Not to mention that forward compatibility has value.)

I don’t see why it’s in TiVo’s interest to not make it easy for the 3rd party community to create disk utils at this point. There are already 3rd party proprietary shops offering pre-upgraded units. Once the cat is out of the bag, TiVo should proactively make life easier for its hard core users, enthusiasts, and evangelists. Not too many customers actually will unscrew the box, after all…

zatznotfunny.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: TimF11/18/2010 11:52:46 AM
   of 2093
 
First Glimpse of the Virgin Media UK TiVo
Filed by Dave Zatz under TiVo

zatznotfunny.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: TimF11/18/2010 11:55:51 AM
   of 2093
 
Hands On with the TiVo Slide QWERTY Remote
zatznotfunny.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: i-node who wrote (2066)11/18/2010 12:01:14 PM
From: TimF
   of 2093
 
TiVo's new $99 and 'free' deals are no deal at all
By Rob Pegoraro

You can now buy a TiVo digital video recorder for just $99 and change. Please don't.

The "special holiday offer" headlined on the Alviso, Calif., company's home page looks like a sizable discount at first. Instead of forking over $299.99 upfront, then paying $12.95 a month in service fees, you can spend $99.99 for the DVR from now through Dec. 31 in return for committing to pay $19.99 a month for service for a year. Or ante up an extra $200 for the higher-capacity Premiere XL recorder and sign up for the same monthly rate.

But TiVo's fine print leaves out an unpleasant provision confirmed by company publicist Lacey Haines in a series of e-mails last week: The $19.99 rate remains in effect forever on those discounted TiVo boxes.

So while you'd be doing well after one year, you'd go underwater not long after two.

Let's do the math. TiVo normally sells its Premiere DVR for $299.99 and charges $12.95 a month for service. That yields a total one-year cost of $455.39. After two years, you'll have spent $610.79; after three, $766.19. If you take the $99.99 offer, your expenses hit $339.87 after one year, $579.75 after two and $819.63 after three.

You'll do better under another, non-XL offer that TiVo doesn't mention on its home or product-information pages: Pay nothing for a Premiere in return for committing to two years of $19.99-a-month payments (after which the $19.99 rate remains bolted to the DVR). Under this offer, you'd pay $239.88 after one year, $479.76 after two and $719.64 after three.

But even that cost outstrips the total expense of paying full retail on a Premiere and then $399 for "lifetime service." (That's supposed to mean "life of that one TiVo box," although I've heard from users who talked TiVo into moving their lifetime service to a new DVR.) This caps your total expenses at $698.99. If you keep a TiVo at least as long as the average computer, the lifetime deal is the best one.

I'm sure it's a coincidence that TiVo's online store doesn't mention the lifetime option unless you click through to a small-type listing of payment plans. That page also notes that if you don't buy a full-price Premiere directly from TiVo, you can pay $129 up front for a year of service, a cheaper option than even lifetime until you begin your fourth year with the DVR.

Only if you retire the TiVo after two years can you guarantee that you'll save money on the free offer--and that's assuming that TiVo will offer the same no-money-down deal on a new model in 2012.

As veteran video blogger Dave Zatz noted over the weekend, TiVo has experimented with this kind of promotion before. In September, the company briefly offered the same deals--and it didn't explain the $19.99/month lock-in any better back then.

Maybe this time, TiVo will realize that modeling pricing strategies after the kookier extremes of wireless carriers is no way to build a business.

Have any suggestions for how TiVo could better package its prices--or tips on getting a better deal out of the company? Let me know in the comments.

voices.washingtonpost.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Road Walker11/24/2010 8:04:09 AM
   of 2093
 
"TiVo announces iPad app to control TiVo box" - TUAW.com

tuaw.com

If you're like most iPad users, then you probably surf the web and check out IMDB with your iPad while watching anything that might be showing on the television. TiVo knows this, embraces this, and wishes to support this. They want to make the experience between your television and your iPad even closer.

TiVo announced Monday a new, upcoming iPad app that will let you use many features of the TiVo service all on your iPad, without ever interrupting what's happening on your larger television screen.

The TiVo iPad application will allow you to browse TiVo's program guide, schedule recordings, remotely control your TiVo unit, and browse your library of recorded shows. Additionally, the app will search both broadcast TV and premium services like Netflix, let you check out the cast and crew information of any shows you're watching, as well as schedule shows to be recorded while you're on the road.

Upcoming does mean that it's not out yet, but TiVo says we'll be notified in the customer newsletter as soon as the app is available. It will be interesting to get our hands on the TiVo app since it really could open up a lot of powerful features.

[Via PCMag.com]

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)
Previous 10 Next 10