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   Technology StocksTivo (TIVO) Interactive TV


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To: jlib who wrote (2039)12/30/2008 10:47:20 AM
From: TimF
   of 2093
 
The $235 drive from New Egg wouldn't be set up for Tivo. Still your right that $549 is an inflated price.

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To: jlib who wrote (2039)12/30/2008 1:10:24 PM
From: Dan3
   of 2093
 
Re: Users have been using external RAIDs with the High Definition TiVos for two years

There's a little more to this device than a simple external drive. They've removed the internal drive, and made the system external only (not that big a deal, really), but do keep in mind that there are 2 1TB drives in that enclosure, together with RAID 1 controller, power supply, and fan - probably about $275 worth of parts.

I've had a 750gb external on my series 3 for about a year and a half, and heard some clicking from a drive once, a few weeks ago. Having a replicated system would be nice. As it is, I'll probably have to replace both the internal and external drives, and be off line while I copy everything over. (I'll probably take the opportunity to increase the internal drive to 1tb or 1.5tb).

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To: Dan3 who wrote (2041)12/31/2008 6:29:11 PM
From: jlib
   of 2093
 
Yes, the idea is good. I also agree with your dollar value of the upgrade. Compare that to their gouge.

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From: JakeStraw3/25/2009 10:43:45 AM
   of 2093
 
Blockbuster OnDemand coming to TiVo DVRs

Blockbuster's video-on-demand service will be available on most standalone TiVo DVRs in the second half of 2009.
ct.cnet.com

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From: TimF4/30/2009 4:30:41 PM
   of 2093
 
Ten years of TiVo: how far we haven't come
by Nilay Patel, posted Apr 28th 2009 at 2:30PM

engadget.com

TiVo's Jim Denney responds to Engadget!
engadget.com

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From: Glenn Petersen6/3/2009 1:22:30 AM
   of 2093
 
A big win for TiVo:

Court Awards TiVo $190 Million in EchoStar Patent Case

By REUTERS
Published: June 2, 2009
Filed at 6:42 p.m. ET

LOS ANGELES, June 2 (Reuters) - A federal judge in Texas awarded set-top box maker TiVo (NASDAQ:TIVO) Inc <TIVO.O> about $190 million in damages on Tuesday in a long-running patent infringement dispute with DISH Network Corp and EchoStar Corp .

U.S. District Judge David Folsom also ordered EchoStar to disable an infringing function on all but about 193,000 digital video recorders placed with subscribers.

Folson also found that EchoStar violated an injunction he put in place after a Texas jury found the company infringed TiVo's patent with several digital video recorder models by implementing new "workaround" technology that TiVo claimed still infringed.

The court set a June 26 hearing on potential sanctions against EchoStar.

In his final order, Folsom ruled that TiVo should recover from EchoStar $73.9 million plus $15.7 million in interest on the patent infringement claims, plus $103.1 million in damages plus interest accrued during the stay of the injunction.

EchoStar also was ordered to inform the court before it attempts to implement another "design-around" of the patent it infringed.

In a statement, TiVo said it was "extremely gratified by the Court's well reasoned and thorough decision, in which it rejected EchoStar's attempted workaround claim regarding the TiVo patent, found EchoStar to be in contempt of court and ordered the permanent injunction fully enforced."

DISH and EchoStar will appeal the court's decision and file a motion to stay the order with a federal appeals court, the companies said in a statement.

DISH was formerly known as EchoStar Communications Corp. (NASDAQ:DISH) It spun off its technology assets over a year ago, including its set-top box division, to create EchoStar Corp.

nytimes.com

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To: Glenn Petersen who wrote (2045)6/4/2009 9:14:35 AM
From: Road Walker
   of 2093
 
EchoStar says appeals court stays ruling on DVR workaround

Less than 24 hours after a federal judge found EchoStar in contempt in its long-running patent dispute with TiVo, another judge issued a temporary stay Wednesday, according to EchoStar.

"We are pleased that the Federal Appeals Court in Washington temporarily stayed the district court's order in the TiVo litigation. Dish Network customers can continue using their DVRs. We believe that we have strong grounds for appeal," the company said in a statement.

The temporary stay drags out even further a legal contest that is now five years old. It seemed like it had come close to reaching its conclusion on Tuesday evening when U.S. District Judge David Folsom found EchoStar, which is now part of Dish Network, in contempt of court for violating a permanent injunction by reprogramming millions of DVRs with a new "workaround." He then ordered EchoStar to pay $103 million to TiVo.

"The harm caused to TiVo by EchoStar's contempt is substantial," Folsom wrote. "EchoStar has gained millions of customers since this court's injunction was issued, customers that are now potentially unreachable by TiVo."

TiVo first sued EchoStar in 2004 for violating a patent on a "multimedia time-warping system," which involved recording a program on one channel while watching another.

A jury in 2006 found that Dish Network's DVRs infringed upon a patent held by TiVo and ordered it to pay TiVo $73.9 million in damages. A federal appeals court upheld the ruling in January 2008, as did a second U.S. appeals court in April 2008.

CNET News' Steven Musil contributed to this report.

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To: Road Walker who wrote (2046)6/21/2009 5:46:45 PM
From: Dan3
   of 2093
 
TiVo Wants to Be the Google of Television. How?
By helping viewers search for programs and by selling ads and ratings data to advertisers. A still-potent brand name and 140 patents should help
By Ronald Grover

June 29, 2009

It's a familiar story. Upstart popularizes technology that threatens to disrupt an industry. Larger rivals enter picture and try to squeeze out little guy. TiVo (TIVO), whose set-top boxes made it routine for viewers to save TV shows on a hard drive so they could watch them later (and fast-forward through the ads), has followed this very trajectory. The cable companies began rolling out their own digital videorecorders a few years ago, and TiVo has been hemorrhaging subscribers ever since.
The TiVo story doesn't end there, however. By leveraging its still potent brand name and cache of more than 140 patents, the Alviso (Calif.) company is trying to remake itself as the Google (GOOG) of television—helping viewers navigate the increasing crush of entertainment choices and selling ads to boot. "Like Google," says CEO Thomas S. Rogers, "TiVo will bring that ease of use to TV sets." A laudable goal, but this is a crowded field.

There's a lot more at: businessweek.com

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To: Dan3 who wrote (2047)6/22/2009 12:17:39 AM
From: Sr K
   of 2093
 
How did you get

June 29, 2009

on your copy?

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To: Sr K who wrote (2048)6/22/2009 7:15:36 AM
From: Dan3
   of 2093
 
Re: How did you get

June 29, 2009

on your copy?


It was a copy and paste.

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