SI
SI
discoversearch

We've detected that you're using an ad content blocking browser plug-in or feature. Ads provide a critical source of revenue to the continued operation of Silicon Investor.  We ask that you disable ad blocking while on Silicon Investor in the best interests of our community.  If you are not using an ad blocker but are still receiving this message, make sure your browser's tracking protection is set to the 'standard' level.

   Technology StocksTivo (TIVO) Interactive TV


Previous 10 Next 10 
To: Road Walker who wrote (2028)9/29/2008 3:00:05 PM
From: Cogito
   of 2093
 
>>HD? Probably not.<<

John -

If it's not HD, it's DOA.

- Allen

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Cogito who wrote (2029)9/30/2008 6:19:55 AM
From: Road Walker
   of 2093
 
Sounds like it is HD from their web site:

Highlights of Nero LiquidTV™ | TiVo® PC
Enjoy the unique and easy-to-use TiVo interface
Watch and record shows in HD and Standard formats on your TV or on your PC
Export your favorite programs to portable media players
Burn shows to DVD or save them to your hard drive
Schedule TV recordings online (US and Canada only)
Pause Live TV on your PC
Includes a 12-month subscription to the TiVo® service
All the great TiVo features like Season Pass® and WishList® included
nero.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (2)


To: Road Walker who wrote (2030)9/30/2008 2:07:00 PM
From: pyslent
   of 2093
 
I think that's a tough sell to the Windows Vista crowd. I was the biggest TiVo fan until I got a Windows Media Center PC. Now, I don't see a compelling reason to switch to TiVo software, even if there weren't the matter of the extra $99 more per year. Granted, there are some benefits to existing Series 2/3 users, who could share recorded shows over the network, but my S1 DirecTiVo offers no such benefits.

IMO, TiVo would have been better served focusing on the Mac market, where there's no free alternative.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: pyslent who wrote (2031)9/30/2008 2:16:55 PM
From: Road Walker
   of 2093
 
Good points... I also have Vista Media Center (and had the previous version of MCE as well). Does Media Center record in HD? If so I haven't figured out how to do it... though I haven't tried very hard because I have a HD-DVR in the family room.

Media Center is actually a very good interface. It beats TiVo on a couple of things IMHO.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Road Walker who wrote (2032)9/30/2008 3:30:58 PM
From: pyslent
   of 2093
 
Both XP and Vista Media Center officially support up to 2 HD tuners as long as you have the hardware. The $200 TiVo package includes a USB digital tuner, but if you already have one (or wish to buy it separately for <$100), you can get the software alone for $99.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: pyslent who wrote (2033)9/30/2008 3:42:00 PM
From: Road Walker
   of 2093
 
as long as you have the hardware

Ah, that's the problem.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)


To: Road Walker who wrote (2034)9/30/2008 5:06:28 PM
From: pyslent
   of 2093
 
Ah, that's the problem.

To be complete, you actually need 2 things to record HD on your PC-- a digital tuner card AND decent OTA antenna reception.

This applies to both the TiVo software and Windows Media Center.

Personally, I feel that the potential market is so small that I'm surprised TiVo bothered with this product... makes me wonder if it's not intended as a prelude to a patent lawsuit against Microsoft.

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


To: Road Walker who wrote (2030)9/30/2008 7:31:06 PM
From: Cogito
   of 2093
 
John -

This is very cool.

It makes me want to build my own custom TiVo box, using some kind of mini chassis that is very quiet.

I think a terabyte will probably do for storage. Maybe 1.5.

Or, on the other hand, I can just wait for the DirecTiVo HD.

Yes. That's probably what I'll do.

- Allen

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: Road Walker10/30/2008 2:10:32 PM
   of 2093
 
Netflix, TiVo team up after 4-year courtship (AP)
Posted on Thu Oct 30, 2008 7:41AM EDT

SAN FRANCISCO - Home entertainment trendsetters Netflix Inc. and TiVo Inc. are finally joining forces to deliver more movies and old TV episodes to their mutual subscribers, consummating a relationship that was supposed to come together four years ago.

Under the partnership announced Thursday, the latest generation of TiVo's digital video recorders will be able to beam selections from 12,000 movies and TV shows offered through Netflix's streaming service, which must be piped over high-speed Internet connections. TiVo's DVRs will start catering to Netflix subscribers in early December.

The collaboration fulfills a promise made in 2004 when DVR pioneer TiVo and online DVD rental trailblazer Netflix set out to develop a system for delivering video directly over the Internet. But they got sidetracked after Netflix couldn't work out licensing deals with movie and TV studios.

By the time Netflix cleared the licensing hurdle and launched its Internet streaming service 21 months ago, the two companies had decided to pursue other partners.

But a reconciliation was inevitable, according to the leaders of Netflix and TiVo, whose Silicon Valley headquarters are about 18 miles apart.

"It's just a natural pairing and we are thrilled to finally be working with them," said Reed Hastings, Netflix's chief executive officer.

"I don't think there is any question we have gotten more frequently than, `What about TiVo and Netflix working together?'" said TiVo CEO Tom Rogers.

Coming off the first back-to-back quarterly profits in its 11-year history, TiVo is betting its ties to Netflix and other content providers like Amazon.com Inc. and Google Inc.'s YouTube will help distinguish its $299 DVRs from the generic recorders peddled by cable TV providers.

Alviso-based TiVo ended July with 3.6 million subscribers and Los Gatos-based Netflix ended with 8.7 million subscribers. The streaming service is available at no extra charge to any Netflix subscriber paying at least $8.99 per month for DVD rentals — a prerequisite that most customers meet.

TiVo will join other companies that sell devices that make it easier for Netflix's streaming service to be shown on a TV set instead of a computer.

Since Silicon Valley startup Roku Inc. introduced a $100 player tailored for Netflix's streaming service five months ago, Microsoft Corp. has agreed to tweak its video game console, the Xbox 360, so it can draw from Netflix's Internet library beginning next month. And both LG Electronics and Samsung Electronics are selling Blu-ray DVD players compatible with Netflix's streaming service.

Netflix eventually hopes to have its streaming service on dozens of devices, including TVs with built-in wireless connections to the Internet.

The growing selection of streaming devices could help boost Netflix's profits by causing subscribers to request fewer DVDs. Each DVD rental makes a round trip through the postal service that costs Netflix 84 cents, so fewer requests will lower expenses — just as management is striving to save money to offset slowing revenue growth.

Netflix still has to pay movie and TV studios licensing fees for the streaming rights, but that doesn't cost as much as mailing DVDs, said Wedbush Morgan Securities analyst Michael Pachter.

"Netflix has really stumbled upon something that's pretty clever," Pachter said. "It's kind of a win for everyone because the customer gets the instant gratification of watching a movie over the Internet, studios get more licensing fees and Netflix saves money."

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last Read


From: TimF12/12/2008 9:21:37 PM
   of 2093
 
WeaKnees Debuts TiVo and DVR Backup Systems
wkblog.com

Share RecommendKeepReplyMark as Last ReadRead Replies (1)
Previous 10 Next 10